Raping paradise: California's water and aqueduct wars in the Owens Valley

The Snow-Capped Sierras

          Our view of the Sierras today; photo taken                             from dusty Bishop
Our view of the Sierras today; photo taken from dusty Bishop | Source

Once This Valley Was a Paradise

You can see the beauty of our Valley long ago.
You can see the beauty of our Valley long ago. | Source

The Place

I live in the small town of Bishop, California, which sits in Inyo County-gracefully nestled in the Owens Valley. The Valley hugs the Eastern border of California for approximately 75 miles, running South to North. This photo provides a common sight from most areas nearby along Highway 395 which travels the length of this state. This highway runs 1305 miles from the Mojave Desert to the Canadian border.

It is possible to see Mount Tom to the West in the Sierras, to the East, the White Mountains. A paradise, it would seem. Once rich farmland and the playground for numerous waterfowl and other creatures, this Valley once knew many wheat crops and fruit orchards; it was the primary beneficiary of the annual melting of the snow pack from the Sierras. Yet the Owens Valley is no longer a haven for the farmer or the fowl; it has suffered primarily due an ongoing battle with the city of Los Angeles over one unquestionably precious resource-water.

Frederick Eaton, Los Angeles' First Mayor

                     Frederick Eaton
Frederick Eaton | Source

William Mullholland

          William Mullholland
William Mullholland | Source

One Side of the Story

When Frederick Eaton (b: 1856, d: 1934) became the mayor of Los Angeles in 1898, he chose his good friend and engineering genius, William Mullholland (b: 1855, d: 1935), to head the newly formed Los Angeles Department of Water and Power after Mullholland had served a brief stint as a ditch digger. By 1905, Los Angeles had grown into a relatively small town of 9,000 souls, yet still a community with extraordinary promise. However, Eaton and Mullholland realized that the city's growth potential was sorely limited by its supposed lack of fresh water. Roughly 250 miles to the Northeast lay their controversial solution.

The runoff from the Sierra Nevadas is naturally brought down the mountains by numerous rivers-the mightiest, at the time, the Owens River. At a lengthy 62 miles, the river irrigated the Owens Valley quite handily. What Mullholland conceived of as superintendent of the L.A.D.W.P was a plan to use gravity-fed aqueducts to divert water to Los Angeles. The San Fernando Valley investors were in fact the first recipients of this diversion, and what had once been termed the "Switzerland of California" effectively became a desert by the year 1924.

Photo of Topographical Map of Owens Valley

               Owens Valley, California
Owens Valley, California | Source

A Map of Our Area

   Our Owens Valley and Surrounding Mountains
Our Owens Valley and Surrounding Mountains | Source

The California Water Wars: 1905-?

Through bribery, shady dealings, and out and out lies, the heavy-handed leaders of Los Angeles at the turn of the century began as early as 1905 to purchase land and water rights in the Owens Valley, convincing the residents that water would not be used for irrigation, only for domestic purposes.

Mullholland was furthermore successful at convincing the populace of Los Angeles that it was facing a water crisis, when in fact, there was no imminent emergency whatsoever. Even as the metropolis began to swell, no water woes were in sight.

Building of the Aqueduct

A 233 mile long behemoth, the Los Angeles aqueduct was begun in 1905, and construction was completed in 1913-supervised and envisioned by Mullholland himself. His foresight and extraordinary talents cannot be overlooked, for the aqueduct was indeed an engineering feat of enormous proportions. Mullholland was certainly not a novice in diverting and the redirection of water, he oversaw his first pipeline in 1880, and was instrumental in the construction of the Panama Canal, the Hoover Dam and the Colorado River Aqueduct at various times during his engineering career. The LA aqueduct in particular was unique, however, in that:

"It consisted of 223 miles of 12 foot diameter steel pipe, 120 miles of railroad track, two hydroelectric plants, 170 miles of power lines, 240 miles of telephone line, a cement plant, and 500 miles of road."

In other words, the operation and building of this aqueduct was a massive undertaking, employing a formidable 5,000 workers to finish the project in only eight years. At the ceremony which accompanied the opening of the conduit on November 5th, 1913, Mullholland uttered the infamous phrase, "There it is. Take it."

Will L.A. Obey the Court Order?

What Los Angeles is Ordered to Do.
What Los Angeles is Ordered to Do. | Source

Dynamite as Expression, not Solution

Evidence found of dynamite in the Owens Valley-                circa 1924
Evidence found of dynamite in the Owens Valley- circa 1924 | Source

The Response

At the beginning of the construction of the L.A. Aqueduct, however, the residents of the Owens Valley were expecting great economic growth and improved farming conditions due to a new enterprise by the name of the Owens Valley Irrigation Project. This project was one of the plans of the infant Bureau of Reclamation Service, which intended to provide the Valley with the necessary diversions in order for farmers and ranchers to thrive. Frederick Eaton, still heavily involved in the vision of the Aqueduct, was successful in blocking the project. Eaton was cunning at misleading Theodore Roosevelt as well as the residents of the Valley through the aforementioned shady dealings. This was certainly another victory for Los Angeles, and was accomplished via land and water rights purchases.

Historically, this was the last straw for the residents of the Owens Valley. While many had been gainfully employed in the construction of the Aqueduct, by 1924, it was brutally evident that the Owens Valley was damaged almost beyond repair. In May of that year, residents planted dynamite at a critical part of the system, and in November, 70 armed men shut off the water flow at a gate in the aqueduct. The next day, 700 more individuals joined them in demonstration. Los Angeles bigwigs were up in arms, but the local sheriff was sympathetic, the Governor of California at the time refused to take action, and even the L.A.Times reported that the people involved in the uprising were "...honest, earnest hardworking American citizens who look upon Los Angeles as an Octopus about to strangle out their lives."

After the Owens Valley had been virtually drained of water, William Mullholland had this to say regarding the violence his vision had inspired:

"[He] half regretted the demise of so many of the valley's orchard trees, because now there were no longer enough trees to hang all the troublemakers who live there."

http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/people/i_r/mulholland.htm

Mullholland Himself Damaged Beyond Repair

William Mullholland at the St. Francis Dam
William Mullholland at the St. Francis Dam | Source

The End of an Era

By 1928, agriculture had become a thing of the past in the Owens Valley; Los Angeles owned 90% of the water and real estate. This has barely changed over the years, and the L.A.D.W.P continues to maintain strict control over much of the growth in the area to protect its resources. One reporter at the local paper,The Inyo Register, has termed this Valley "...Mayberry..." due to it's unchanging nature, dry though it may be.

Unfortunately for Mr. Mullholland, a project to provide yet another reservoir for Owens Valley water at the St. Francis Dam failed within hours of his supervisory approval. The dam was constructed just 45 miles from Los Angeles, northeast of the city in the Santa Clarita Valley. At around midnight on March 12, 1928, in what is deemed the worst civil engineering disaster of the 20th Century, the central and most critical part of the dam gave way, and 12,500,000,000 gallons of water poured into the Santa Clarita Valley. This enormous amount of water weighed 52 million tons and within seconds, covered the Valley, leaving the city of Santa Paula buried under 20 feet of mud. As the water, mud and debris traveled Westward, parts of Ventura County were similarly left under 70 feet of wreckage. It is estimated that 450-500 people perished in this disaster, and bodies were found as far South as San Diego, floating in the Pacific Ocean.

William Mullholland was forced to resign in disgrace from the L.A.D.W.P. following this event, however he was not found responsible for the disaster. He died in 1935.

The Owens Valley Today

To the south of Bishop, near Lone Pine, Ca., one can see what remains of the Owens Lake. Today it is called the Owens Valley Dry Lake:

http://geochange.er.usgs.gov/sw/impacts/geology/owens/,

an alkali flat which is considered to be the largest source of toxic dust pollution in the nation. Though the L.A.D.W.P. has been court ordered to begin its restoration, it is extremely slow going and a source of ongoing resentment from the residents, understandably. Beginning in 2006, water was once again flowing from the Lower Owens River into the Lake, allowing fish, ducks, and geese to return, yet it will perhaps be generations before what was will be again.

View of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Range

   Beautiful Even Today
Beautiful Even Today | Source

More by this Author


Comments 95 comments

dohn121 profile image

dohn121 6 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York

You must have really worked hard on this hub, Laurel. Your information regarding this topic lacked nothing and provided enough information to have it made into a text book chapter. Excellent research! Thanks for sharing this--I hope that more will come by to learn about Mullholland and his aqueduct. I also enjoyed the pictures AND the title!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks, dohn-I really enjoyed the research, though it incensed me thoroughly!

Laurel


Green Lotus profile image

Green Lotus 6 years ago from Atlanta, GA

This a sad story beautiful written and masterfully researched. Wonderful reading, lorlie. We can only hope that Mullholland's soul gathers the Karma it created for itself and that California's Owens Valley will flourish once again.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Green Lotus, I always look forward to your responses to my Hubs-thank you.

Karma certainly will work its way through this entire affair, and we'll be the benefactors...one day!

Laurel


Tammy Lochmann profile image

Tammy Lochmann 6 years ago

Interesting and sad story. It's such a travesty that greed can lead to tragedy and devastation. You are such a prolific writer.


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

What an interesting piece of history and you did a great job of writing the particulars. It is a sad story for the Owens valley people in that era. Thanks for a great hub.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Tammy and Pamela-thanks for stopping by. And to think Mullholland Highway and Drive exist as an honor to this guy!

Laurel


wordscribe41 6 years ago

Mulholland drive is also a movie, right? Anyway, things like this irritate the blank out of me. I'm a huge animal lover (in most cases more than a people lover) and it's things like this that yank my chain. I hope it will be back to its glorious state sometime in our lifetimes. What a huge amount of research and work you had to have put into this, Lorlie. It certainly shows. Hugs about your kitty.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks, WS, for reading through this monster, but I got sooo mad about it-can you tell? :) Anyway, the movie is called "Chinatown" and came out in the 70's or 80's about all the underhanded wheelings and dealings Mullholland et al. did. I haven't seen it so I thought I'd better not mention it.

And I really appreciate your words about Rocky, you're a doll.

Love,

Laurel


mod2vint profile image

mod2vint 6 years ago from Sunny Florida

Great hub a very interesting read!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks for coming by, mod2vint!


Cathi Sutton 6 years ago

Wonderful Hub with great information. Plus the pictures were perfect! Thanks for another great read!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Cathi-Thanks for such a sweet comment. Why don't you join in? HubPages is the #%%(((!!

Laurel


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

Laurel - what a wonderful story well told and with much research. It is so typical of the hubris of humanity that we can control the earth and rape nature without consequences. Typical too that people look to their own interests at the expense of others. This is a very human story and I loved reading it. Thank you.

Love and peace

Tony


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thank you, Tony, for doing so.


Millionheir 6 years ago

Lorlie thank you for this well written hub. The government does have a way of swindling it's people out of their most precious resources. L.A.D.W.P is just one of the many stories that have yet to surface. It's a horrible thing that nature and good farmers lost what would've been a great land to cultivate healthy crop. Now we pay more for organic.


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 6 years ago from London, UK

Interesting Story. The Owens valley - even the name has a very nice ring to it. You live in a Gorgeous place, Lorlie. I just hope "what Was" will be again. Sounds like a beautiful Scenery all round.


ralwus 6 years ago

Too bad someone didn't hang him and his cohorts on an old sour apple tree Huh? Nice job Laurel.


theirishobserver. profile image

theirishobserver. 6 years ago from Ireland

This is one of the most interesting hubs I have read to date, you clearly have a passion for your enviroment and your country - the detail and pictures are brilliant - I have been inspired to do a good hub about Ireland and its various landmarks and historical development - I will do this soon - you have shown great insight into the history of your community - I would love to climb up to that snow, I absolutely love it - well done - now take a break and come chat in the forums.....Irish


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

You have all been very kind and understanding about this particular hub. It's not my 'norm.' But once I started thinking on it-didn't even see "Chinatown"-I just got madder and madder...and to think the bastards still own the place-essentially.

Ralwus-You bet, a dead one at that!


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 6 years ago from US

very nice and well written plus well researched hub as well,

environment suffers!

I am happy to read about this hub, I have never been to Cali, and you write it with savvy, light but well informed, Maita


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 6 years ago from Southern California, USA

Sad what happened to the Owens Valley. The Sierra country is beautiful, and too bad we cannot have found better ways to furnish the entire state with water.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks for coming by, PDH and SweetiePie! It is so sad that nature suffers. All for fame and money.

Laurel


jill of alltrades profile image

jill of alltrades 6 years ago from Philippines

Wow, what a piece of history! This is so powerfully written that I felt so bad for the farmers and the land. Your title describes it all!

Thanks for sharing Lorlie!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

I really appreciate your words, jill!

Laurel


Singing Bill profile image

Singing Bill 6 years ago

Laurel,

This is a great hub. I really enjoyed reading it. You did some great research and writing.

Also, thank you for reading some of my hubs and commenting on them. You were very kind.

Bill


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

I don't plan to stop reading yours any time soon, Singing Bill!

Thanks for stopping by.

Laurel


TrixieGator profile image

TrixieGator 6 years ago

hi..very interesting..well written..and sad..thank you


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks for stopping by, Trixie!


Clint Alexander profile image

Clint Alexander 6 years ago

Great article lorlie6. I love the images and maps.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

I appreciate it, Clint.


habee profile image

habee 6 years ago from Georgia

Excellent hub and great research! Big thumbs up!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks habee! I am thrilled that you stopped by-

Laurel


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 6 years ago from East Coast, United States

Lorlie, what a wonderfully researched and written hub! I remember some of the story and have heard recently about the Owen's Valley restoration. It's amazing the destruction people are capable of causing.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

It really is astounding, Dolores-I found myself mortified by the lies and deception that went on in order to satisfy one man's vision.

Thanks for coming by!

Laurel


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 6 years ago from US

hiya, I am gld to see you at the forums, just saying hi and checking if you have new hub, morning, maita


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Good Morning, Maita! Thanks for stopping by...

Laurel


kowality profile image

kowality 6 years ago from Everywhere

Lorlie..this is an amazing hub. It is a painful thing to see the power of money constantly battering our Mother Earth. But like all Mothers, the love for her children is immeasurable and she'll do everything to protect them. I'm finding more talent on HubPages then anywhere else. Thank You Lorlie


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

I agree wholeheartedly, kowality. Perhaps some day we will learn.


lyricsingray 6 years ago

WOW this was no doubt a ton of work but well worth the end result, no doubt.

Great job, enjoyed the information

Thanks

Kimberly


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Glad to see you, Kimberly! Thanks-yep, took me around a week and a half to get it together, but I live here, so it was a passion work.


blondepoet profile image

blondepoet 6 years ago from australia

Wow Lorlie you put in some really fine work into this hub. A huge thumbs up buddy, beautiful pics too. :) :)


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Coming from you, BP, that means a lot. I thank you and am happy you came by!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas

"They call it Paradise, I don't know why, call some place Paradise--kiss it goodbye."

In Bermuda every house has drainage into clean reservoirs and no one pays for any water--ever. I've often watched the LA River (concrete) water zoom down to the ocean after rainstorms and kicked our collective butts for not finding a way to divert and use it--thus freeing you guys from your riparian slavery. Hey big word huh. =:)

My spirit is up there with you and the Dusy Basin and Bishop Valley. At least you have the snow. =:)


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks, Winsome-it's been kissed, all right! :)


R. J. Lefebvre 6 years ago

Lorie,

I'm also infavor of protecting our environment, unfortunately money talks louder than words.

Ronnie


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

It is so true, Ronnie, and it makes me ashamed, somehow. The wheelings and dealings of this man and others back in the 30's ignored the potential damage and did chase after the cash.

Thanks for stopping by.


AEvans profile image

AEvans 6 years ago from SomeWhere Out There

How sad ! Greed, corruption and what is has done is began to lead to destruction. All of that beauty lost enjoyed the hub Lorlie and your pics of the mountains were dreamy thank you so much fot sharing them. :)


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

I am so glad that you took the time to read about this crime, AEvans. It really sickens me that nothing can be done about it now, so we must learn to live with it.


Mystique1957 profile image

Mystique1957 6 years ago from Caracas-Venezuela

Laurel...

Wonderful hub. It certainly kept me on track of what´s up in California. I lived 4 years in Los Angeles. But at that time(1981-1985) I was at sea on those matters. How sad people fighting over something that should benefit the planet and not a greedy few... And then people wonders what´s going on on Earth...Sigh!

Thanks for sharing!

warmest regards and infinite eternal blessings,

Al


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thank you Al-you know we all take time to awaken to the complexity of our life on this planet. It has taken me 53 years to appreciate some of what's gone on in the name of money. In the early 80's I had absolutely no interest in these matters, either!


Faybe Bay profile image

Faybe Bay 6 years ago from Florida

This is what they are saying when they say, be an expert. This is truly a masterpiece. I never knew this much history of any single place. It is astounding what you have dug up. This is like finding a gold mine. Thank you for writing it for us.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks so much, Faybe. I was sitting in my backyard recently looking at the breathtaking Sierras and thinking of the melting snow. Somehow I just had to know why we live in a DESERT, you know? Thus this hub.

Anyhow, thanks again for reading-I really do appreciate it.


hypnodude profile image

hypnodude 6 years ago from Italy

Very good hub. A sad story of greed and stupidity worth knowing. And you write very well. Rated up and stumbled.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Why thank you, dear sir!


mistrunner 6 years ago

Lorlie, thankyou for your kind words. This is an incredibly informative hub, your research must have been exhausting. On top of the information you have provided, you writing flowed in such a poetic way, it was an absolute pleasure to read. I personally enjoy well written history, and this is of the very highest standard. Paradise raped is more than an apt name for this hub, and I would like to quote the eagles when they sang, "to call someplace paradise, Kiss man goodbye" Thankyou for sharing this.


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

Howdy Ma'am. This is a very well done hub. Often if one brings up a story about people of power it's dismissed as just "conspiracy theory". But- if something's worth having -there will be conniving and stealing with sometimes a murder thrown in. This is very well done. Thanks for the pictures too.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

It is my sincere pleasure, Micky-happy biking!


Kay Creates profile image

Kay Creates 6 years ago from Ohio

Very interesting and sad story.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks, Kay. It is very sad looking at all the desert here now, but we survive.


Springboard profile image

Springboard 6 years ago from Wisconsin

A terrible tragedy, but one that unfortunately happens all too often. When a lot of special interests get into play, it has the effect of whittling away at good things—and promises never happen the way they are sold.

Excellent article lorlie.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

It is so incredibly intertwined, isn't it, Springboard? One of these days I may follow up on some of the shenanigans a bit more in depth.

Thanks for your comment!


ericsomething profile image

ericsomething 6 years ago from Charleston, SC and Riverside, CA

Excellent research, good work all around. I used to live in Riverside, and I do remember the occasional dustings we'd get from Owens Valley. I mean, getting this white alkali stuff everywhere.

I didn't realize Mulholland's role with the Colorado River Aqueduct and Hoover Dam. Of course the Bureau of Reclamation sure did a job of emasculating the Colorado River, too.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks, ericsomething. Mullholland got around, all right.

I appreciate you coming by.


Sue1226 profile image

Sue1226 6 years ago from Dallas, Texas

wow, it is pretty country and I really hope it gets back where it was. Your article was very interesting,you must of done a lot of research, I know how that is I do research when I do the newsletter at my church. I really enjoyed learning more about our country, I think my son and I past by there about nine or so months ago. When we were checking out the sights, and doing a faith adventure.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks so much, Sue, for coming by-in person, too! All we can do here is try to get around some of the DWP regulations and water, water, water!

But of course, we conserve as much as we can, too.


lxxy profile image

lxxy 6 years ago from Beneath, Between, Beyond

Wow, totally in depth. On our way up to Sacramento k@ri and I spotted signs that read "congress created dust bowl." Miles and miles of dirt....little water.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

So true, Ixxy. Thanks for the visit.


C.S.Alexis profile image

C.S.Alexis 6 years ago from NW Indiana

your depth is amazing, I read this one because I too have this troubled heart about the good Earth being RAPED. Thanks for sharing, I envision you as light in the valley, guiding the weary.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

C.S.-Thanks for coming by. It is a travesty, especially since water is still in the grips of the Los Angeles DWP. And of course now we have the worst oil spill ever. When will it end?

I really appreciate your visit!


Kangaroo_Jase profile image

Kangaroo_Jase 6 years ago from Melbourne, Australia

What an intriguing look at an area of history and environment, especially when it is around one's very own home. Then, there is nothing like enjoying and understanding what is going on in ones own backyard. Very good hub you have here, Laurel.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks so much, KJ! And the drama goes on and on and on...


Hypnosis-books 6 years ago

The depth of this hub makes me admire you.

You are the awesome.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks sincerely, Hypnosis-books-that's quite a compliment!


dallas93444 profile image

dallas93444 6 years ago from Bakersfield, CA

I am familiar with this "rape." It is against every "fairness" policy and should be against the law to rape and pillage another community. As a former real estate developer, I had to prove utilities and water were available. I would have to make mutual beneficial agreements on occasion to obtain the needed water. But never rape another area! This is wrong!!!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks for your input, Dallas. I suppose back in the early part of that century it was not considered rape-it was necessity.

Or at least that's what they thought!


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 6 years ago from Wales

I loved reading this as much as I have all your other work. Brilliantly told and you're giving me the inspiration I need to carry on with my 'new life!' Thank you so much.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

I'm so very glad we 'found' each other, Eiddwen. I think we're following similar paths!

Thanks for stopping by.


Iggy Sarducci profile image

Iggy Sarducci 6 years ago from Wherever I am now

Beautiful, sad, sad story, Lorlie. I am glad to get more background in the LA water heist I've always heard about.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

It's such a tragedy, and it still goes on. The LADWP owns virtually everything around here.

Thanks again for coming by!


Iggy Sarducci profile image

Iggy Sarducci 6 years ago from Wherever I am now

Gross. But that's how things work in this country, and most of the world. :(


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

So true, Iggy, so true. Fucking misers.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 5 years ago from South Africa

Lorie, I found this hub of yours titled "Raping Paradise: California's Water Wars" extremely interesting and well-written. I wholeheartedly agree with Website Examiner’s beautiful, objective and positive review, which I see as an inspiration to you as well as all readers.

Thumbs UP, my friend. I’m leaving you the link to W.E.’s review for all your readers to follow. http://hubpages.com/hub/In-Review-Lorlie6-on-HubPa...


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 5 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks, Martie, for the link! I am so very sorry it's taken me so long to reply, but at the moment, I am enjoying my new grandson!!

Much love to you, my friend!


Website Examiner 5 years ago

This hub has been reviewed. Have a good day! W.E.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 5 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks so much, W.E.!


Website Examiner 5 years ago

Oh, so much for my not reading the prior comments. What I meant to say is: Thank you for the opportunity to have reviewed this hub. It was one of the more memorable among all the hubs reviewed. Take care, Lorlie.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 5 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Thanks for the clarification, W.E., I appreciate your(?) coming back.


hafeezrm profile image

hafeezrm 5 years ago from Pakistan

I read a lot about Owens Valley said to the deepest in USA. Quite often, I travelled on California Expressway and Highway specially when going to Reno, Nevada and surely had a glimpse of the valley.

Reading your hub, I realize how little knowledge I had about this strategic place. If I go there again, I would keep my eyes open and would surely spend a night or two at famous town of Bishop.

Thanks for sharing.


Larry Darnell 4 years ago

Lest anyone think this 'history' is about the past, read this: http://mammothtimes.com/content/ladwp-sues-another...


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 4 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

It truly will not end, it seems, Larry-thanks for the link.

Laurel


Chris Forte 2 years ago

One thing you should mention about William Mulholland: it is said that when he saw the Merced River in the Yosemite Valley, he commented, "look at all that waste." (Or it could have been the now Hetch Hetchy Reservoir when that aqueduct was being surveyed)

As to the unchanging nature of Bishop: that is both a blessing and a curse. We don't want out-of-control suburban sprawl like other parts of the High Desert, but at the same time, we do need more homes and jobs for our young people (like me, though not so young anymore), and I would love to see the farms and orchards return!!


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 2 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

Wow, Chris-when I wrote this article, I think I read that quote, but didn't include it-so much to say! What a guy :( And as to the blessing and curse issue, I was talking just Tuesday last about that very thing to some of my 'lady friends''

I am so glad you came here to check this out, from one Bishop-'onian' to another!

Take good care,

Laurel


paperfacets profile image

paperfacets 2 years ago from La Verne, CA

The Owen's Lake bed is looking much different in 2014. It is hard to imagine boats plied the water before 1906. In the eighties the white expanse showed only destruction. Interesting writing on a topic I have been watching for decades. Thank you for the additional information.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 2 years ago from Bishop, Ca Author

paperfacets, thanks for stopping by. I've lived here for around 20 years and it's still changing. I appreciate your words and keep on watching!

Laurel

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working