O'REILLY & THE AUTHOR.

Brilliant conversation.

One of the most brilliant personalities on television these days is Bill O'Reilly; and most people watch him for pure politics and nothing more. Why? Because he is extremely good at that discipline.

He is naturally argumentative, which is somehow good for a show as his, as it has its serious side as well, but also it tends to look like a designed episode to idolize the host of "The O'Reilly Factor" himself on Fox News.

He brings on some characters, who are useful in filling time, such as Dennis Miller; but he is no fool at all, as he makes his presence count always. So, a portion has been created for him.

Nobody actually knows who is using whom; but O'Reilly and Miller work together so beautifully to the extent that without Miller being on the program, O'Reilly does not seem to be too happy; many viewers have observed.

Yet, all that is beside the point, to say that O'Reilly's conversation with a gentleman, who is an atheist, is a masterpiece, in every sense of the word. The person is also an author, and his newest book titled "The magic of reality" is presently on the newsstands and in bookstores.

O'Reilly maintains that the book is directed to children and adolescent, and it is designed purposely to sway them to believe in science only. In other words, the idea or the concept of God and/or Creation must be inconsequential, from a scientific point of view. Therefore, there is some indoctrination there.

The author emphatically denies that; and then the talks enters a phase, where he has to answer if religion has any constraints on human behavior; is it not?

A full or direct response does not come from him, except to say that part of it, religion, has nothing to do with human existence, like "The Sabbath" being honored. Also that everything seen as reality is just happenstance.

O'Reilly then says a meteor clashing into a "boom" cannot result into all that is seen; can it? Is it not what science says to explain everything in the Universe? "No; science only explains what is in the natural world," the author replies.

Nevertheless, is not the natural world the same as the Universe? So, what is he talking about?

The conversation continues for a while, with each person trying to score points for either side; but in the end O'Reilly is able to win the day.

He has been able to do so, without being feisty and argumentative as usual. He has used plain language to surpass his opponent. Good show.

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