Political Thought of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) observed that the Declaration of Independence is "the most eloquent and unequivocal expression of the dignity of man ever set forth in a sociopolitical document." King believed that the Declaration and the Bible expressed the "sacredness of human personality."


The moral principles of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. were based on his faith as a Christian. His inspiration came from the teachings of Jesus Christ. Therefore he did not buy into the notion that man is merely "a transient accident of protons and electrons traveling blind."


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had faith that God had ordained a moral order and a purpose to life for all people. He believed that the dignity and freedom of human persons was a gift from a gracious God. King taught that people need to love God, love their neighbors—and love their enemies.


DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

NONVIOLENT PROTEST


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. taught nonviolence in that his people should not initiate violence nor respond in kind to it. His acts of protest were to expose the violence that was extant in the hearts of others; to "force the oppressor to commit his brutality openly—in the light of day—with the rest of the world looking on."


Nonviolent protest requires courage, discipline, and self-sacrifice. It is not born of weakness but of spiritual strength. To love and forgive those who hate you awakens "a sense of moral shame in the opponent, and thereby brings about a transformation."


King did "not seek to defeat or humiliate the opponent, but rather to win his friendship and understanding." To triumph over others is not necessary if you can show them how to triumph over themselves.


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. believed that white Americans could be redeemed from their racism, but that black violence would "intensify the fears of the white majority while relieving it of its guilt." Violence destroys community; nonviolence destroys enemies by making friends of them. Blacks must love the white man because the white man needs his love.


DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WITH HIS FAMILY
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WITH HIS FAMILY

A COLOR BLIND SOCIETY


"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 1963


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. envisioned a color-blind nation that is neutral toward its citizens regardless of race or ethnicity. To move toward this goal he sought to dismantle the legally enforced segregation in schools and public accommodations in the Old South. His efforts were instrumental in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965—despite opposition from Democrats.


The Civil Rights Act outlawed segregation, as well as discrimination in employment. The Voting Rights Act prohibited states from demanding that voters know how to read before they could vote. It was later used to justify the printing of ballots in Spanish and dozens of other languages.


DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DELIVERS A SPEECH IN WASHINGTON DC
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DELIVERS A SPEECH IN WASHINGTON DC

THE SOCIAL GOSPEL AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION


Having achieved his original goals, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. set his sights on housing, schools, jobs, and health care for Negroes. He was committed to the Social Gospel—Jesus Christ commanded us to care for the poor.


King was not opposed to Socialism, but sought a middle way between Socialism and Capitalism: "The good and just society is . . . a socially conscious democracy which reconciles the truths of individualism and collectivism."


King went so far as to demand that people had a "right" to welfare (and job training). He would have loved Affirmative Action because "our society has been doing something special against the Negro for hundreds of years" so "do something special for him now, in order to balance the equation." Ominously he added "All of America's wealth today could not adequately compensate its Negroes for their centuries of exploitation and humiliation."


MARTIN LUTHER KING AND HIS WIFE CORETTA SCOTT KING
MARTIN LUTHER KING AND HIS WIFE CORETTA SCOTT KING

KING'S PREDICTION


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. suggested a G. I. Bill for Negroes. He believed that blacks should be compensated for past discrimination: "It is incontestable and deplorable that Negroes have committed crimes, but they are derivative crimes. They are born of the greater crimes of the white society."


King made a bold prediction as to what would happen if the programs he demanded for Negroes were enacted—which they were:

"I contend that the decline in school dropouts, family breakups, crime rates, illegitimacy, swollen relief roles, and other social evils would stagger the imagination."


DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING

GUARANTEED INCOME


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. favored a guaranteed income for all Americans, even those able-bodied adults who refused to work. He claimed that all poor people were the victims of injustice whose rights had somehow been violated, and that all poor people should be compensated for this injustice. King thought that the poor have a right to the fruits of the labor of the unpoor.

King declared, "The time has come for us to civilize ourselves by the total, direct, and immediate abolition of poverty. The solution to poverty is to abolish it by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income. We must make the nonproducer a consumer."

Here King took his ideas from the progressive John Rawls that the wealth of our nation comes from the "vast treasury of ideas and labor to which both the living and the dead have contributed." The idea of Rawls and then King is that whatever wealth America has produced belongs equally to all Americans.


RADICAL REVOLUTION


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. got more radical in his later years. Even after all of his gains, he hinted that a worldwide revolution against the white man might be liberating for people of color around the globe. He said this would be "the wildest liberation movement in history" and wrote: "The storm is rising against the privileged minority of the earth [white men], from which there is no shelter in isolation and armament."


SOURCES


My source for this article is History of American Political Thought by Frost and Sikkenga.


More by this Author


Comments 63 comments

iantoPF profile image

iantoPF 4 years ago from Sunny California

Excellently written and well balanced article James. I always appreciate your insights.

Personally I was always impressed more by his father "Daddy King" After having his son shot and his wife killed by an explosion meant for him, he still said; "I want it known that here is a man who refuses to hate his enemies."

Martin's view that we should all join in the work of Jesus as in: "I am come that they might have life, and that more abundantly" is a worthy cause. It's a pity that in later years he allowed himself to wander into the camp of "us and them."

Once again, excellent Hub.


live-business profile image

live-business 4 years ago from Somewhere in the USA

Nice hub and perfect timing! I did not know the latter part. Thanks for the information.


steveamy profile image

steveamy 4 years ago from Florida

Interesting Hub. Rarely are King's more radical idea mentioned, it seems we like to scrub our heroes clean of any ideology that might make mainstream America find them less than heroic. Myth is the enemy of History....


CMerritt profile image

CMerritt 4 years ago from Pendleton, Indiana

I think his "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character" is probably THE most profound statement made in our lifetime, and has the same strength and importance today as it did when he first said it.

Though I may not agree with everything he said, his vision for this nation was/is spot on....it needs to be reminded to ALL of us....

another fine read,

Thanks James,

Chris


pcoach 4 years ago

James: I haven't made it over here for some time and that is my loss. This was a wonderful hub. Solemn, thoughtful and enlightening. Voted up and up and up!


Kristine Manley profile image

Kristine Manley 4 years ago from Atlanta, GA

James, what a fabulous Hub! Thanks for reminding us about Dr. King's ideologies. I agree with pcoach, "Solemn, thoughtful, and enlightening." Voted up!


creativelycc profile image

creativelycc 4 years ago from Maine

Excellent hub! Thank you. Dr. King will always be one of my heroes. God bless you,Dr. King's family and all of those who honor his legacy!


Gus Conde 4 years ago

So Good, Chief!


Lone Ranger 4 years ago

Well done, James!

King wrote:

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 1963

--------------

I do not care what color adorns a man's skin; I care about the condition of the character that resides beneath.

So, questions remain: What has Black America shown since Martin Luther King, Jr's speech in 1963? Since MLKJ asked that Blacks be judged by the content of their character, do you think he would be proud of what he would see today?

Best wishes and be well - L.R.

"


stars439 profile image

stars439 4 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

A wonderful hub, and I commend you for a sincere one that did not hold back the truth. I am not pleased with anyone not liking white people because I am white man, and my family is not responsible for slavery, or the ills of unfairness. I still think Martin Luther King had a lot of good in him, but in volitile times I could see why he could slip up , and why nature would takes it course for him with violent words. To possess love is a wonderful blessing. To hold on to it in difficult times would involve the heart of a dozen Ghandi's. Even he was murdered in the end. Hate has done so much harm to our world. Hate out of control is a powerful dangerous force. Love is so much nicer, but not even angels can tolerate it for too long. Look what happened to our Lord Jesus Christ. I love God, but even God has his bad days. Look what Noah had to do. Perfect love belongs to little babies only, and that lasts only five minutes until diapers are damp. God Bless You, and your precious family.


MonetteforJack profile image

MonetteforJack 4 years ago from Tuckerton, NJ

There is something weird with MLK ... I do like a part of his early persona, the time he made the "I had a dream" speech. Then,when he became insistent with the "guaranteed income" -- that part of him, I don't like at all. Maybe, it is because he took to heart his study of Marxism. I am also guessing power and fame went to his head or, the pressure of supporting his belief overwhelmed him so he went totally opposite his character of early years. Thanks for this hub, Sir James!


Spirit Whisperer profile image

Spirit Whisperer 4 years ago from Isle of Man

Another excellent hub James. I particularly liked the following sentiments in your hub which resonate with me as they are ideals I strive to implement in my own life though not always successfully.

"To triumph over others is not necessary if you can triumph over yourself".

and

"Violence destroys community; nonviolence destroys enemies by making friends of them".

For me Dr King was supporting the notion that attack was the ego's device and that love was our way back to God. Judging another for any reason was supporting the ego and turning away from God. The practice of non-violence is in essence a refusal to attack and is symbolic of our conscious decision to refute the ego and choose God.

Your presentation of the ideas here is a brilliant piece which will find a way to burrow into the subconscious of the reader. Bravo!


WD Curry 111 profile image

WD Curry 111 4 years ago from Space Coast

You wrote the piece I wish I could have. I heard Dr. King Speak live on TV in Montgomery Alabama. I was just a kid. I didn't understand politics at all. He was Spirit filled on that day. His dream became my dream.

I am not rich. I can't give anyone a hand-out, but I can give a hand. Stand up and walk . . . we'll go on together. I may need a hand later.


Tamarajo profile image

Tamarajo 4 years ago from Southern Minnesota

Although I can't ascribe to side with all of Dr. Martin Luther Kings political views as some of them seem to lean heavily toward the socialistic. I get where he is coming from on the issues just not certain His method of guaranteed income for the working and able bodied non working alike solves the problem.

I however, certainly admire him for his humanitarian views and his peaceful method of demonstration. I believe that it was much more effective as he said it put the white offenders in a position to bear their own guilt. What a great example for all who face opposition...just keep moving forward and don't react to all the distractions however loud and awful they maybe. I so wish he could see what a difference he really did make. It obviously isn't a perfect world and discrimination is alive and well but we have come such a along way comparatively speaking from where we were when he was here.

God bless his memory and may we think of him with gratitude for all that he did and the way that he did it.


Glenn Stok profile image

Glenn Stok 4 years ago from Long Island, NY

I always thought that Dr. King was a great man, with immense foresight. And now I know why, after reading your Hub. I truly enjoyed getting to know more about his passions and his feelings for the human race. Your Hub gives a better understanding of Dr King. Well done.


no body profile image

no body 4 years ago from Rochester, New York

What made Dr. King great was that he was a Christian and not just any kind of Christian but a socially aware Christian Pastor that wanted to first make sure that people knew his Jesus, and secondly that injustice to the down-trodden must stop. I realize, that just as other patriarchs of the past, Dr. King had some holes in his logic that reflected the pain and hurt of the times. Those holes, I believe would have been mended by the Scripture he loved if he had but lived to realize the error of his thinking that departed from Scripture in those more radical years. I look forward to meeting him someday. He was a real man, a real man with frailties and idiosyncrasies like any other, but responsible for thousands if not millions of souls going to heaven instead of hell. In my estimation that makes him a hero and then when you add the personal pain he went through for his neighbors, his flock, his black brothers, his white neighbors (many of which he knew hated him), his hero status goes through the roof.


Brinafr3sh profile image

Brinafr3sh 4 years ago from West Coast, United States

Hi James, inspirational article, as was and is Martin Luther King Jr. I see beyond the color of someone's skin, I notice people by the content of their character as well. The substance on the inside of a person is who they really are, not their race, their financial status, or their skin color. Thank you.


Pollyannalana profile image

Pollyannalana 4 years ago from US

You know a few weeks back I was reading someone who attacks you and I both and it was about his growing up and feelings about blacks, maybe ignorance yet innocence and harboring no ill will and I really enjoyed that hub until you came there and that person attacked you so unmercifully that I knew he could not have told the truth about any of what he said. I will admit when I was a child I seldom saw a black person but as an adult I have worked with many and have many for friends, one a very dear friend (best of my adulthood). King made that possible and the ones he gave courage to, to stand up for rights. I can't say I agree all poor should have money even ones who don't want to work, I didn't know he thought that, kind of like all the illegals free handouts. That is really about as dumb as American Romance not believing there are homeless children in school. Gee, I guess they go for the food, our government sure don't give a dam. Well that is another story you might want to tell, lol. Great hub, up and across.


poetvix profile image

poetvix 4 years ago from Gone from Texas but still in the south. Surrounded by God's country.

You pulled some great quotes here. While I don't agree with everything the man said, I admire his dedication, faith, intelligence and determination. He was a great man and I think you did him proud here. It's a shame we lost him so early on. Not only did he champion the cause of the black race, but of many others and of women. I could not agree more that race should be of no relevance at all. We all should be judged solely on our character just as he said, after all we are all but human, brothers and sisters in the eyes of God. Bless you and thank you for a very informative hub.


picklesandrufus profile image

picklesandrufus 4 years ago from Virginia Beach, Va

Great hub!! I learned many things I didn't know. I hope one day we will have a color blind society.vote up!


Lone Ranger 4 years ago

Well, Picklesandrufus, if we could just get our government, hospitals, schools and universities from insisting on knowing one's racial identity, we could get somewhere.

Peace out - L.R.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

iantoPF— Thank you for being my first visitor! It is great to hear from you again my friend. I surely appreciate your thoughful comments and your kind compliments.

I followed up this Hub with another one in which I do write about Daddy King!

http://hubpages.com/education/The-Life-of-Dr-Marti...

Thanks again!

James


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

live-business— You are welcome. Thank you for visiting and commenting. Welcome to the HubPages Community!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

steveamy— Thank you, kind sir, for taking the time to stop by and read my Hub. I appreciate your insightful remarks.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

CMerritt— You are most welcome, Chris. It is always a distinct pleasure to hear from you. I agree with you as to the profundity of that statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He was quite a man and well worth everyone's admiration.

Thank, my friend, for reading my article.

James


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James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

pcoach— It sure is good to "see" you again. Thank you ever much for the voted up up and up! I sincerely appreciate your kind comments.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Kristine Manley— You are quite welcome. Thank you so much for your gracious compliments as well as the voted up! I see that you are from Dr. King's hometown. And great town it is! :-)

God Bless You!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

creativelycc— You are welcome. I appreciate your nice note. Dr. King was an amazingly courageous man. Thank you for visiting and commenting. :)


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Gus Conde! Hello my old friend! Thank you for visiting my Hub and leaving your warm words. :D


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 4 years ago

JJRBJ- The strongest introduction you've ever written comes at the top of this page~ your goal was to "hone your craft," you my dear, have arrived........... on a lighter note; the "double dose" was an extremely nice touch......... it was after all Dr. King's Day. ;-) K


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

James - A fine retrospective and tribute for Dr. King on MLK day. Theresa


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Lone Ranger— Thank you very much for your kind compliments and best wishes. I agree with your comments. If MLK was alive today I believe he would be disappointed. But then again, in some ways he would be proud of the progress made by his brothers and sisters. It's a mixed bag I guess. Maybe it always is.

Well, L.R., I appreciate the visit and your comments.

JAW


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

stars439— As you said, Brother, "Hate has done so much harm to our world."

Man. That is the truth.

As you pointed out, "Look what happened to our Lord Jesus Christ."

Look, indeed. If our Lord was so hated by man that He was crucified—the most horrible death ever . . . well, it says a lot about us, doesn't it, my friend?

I like that you added: "Perfect love belongs to little babies only, and that lasts only five minutes until diapers are damp."

LOL! It is good to have a bit of levity thrown in.

Thank you for taking the time to read my article about Dr. Martin Luther KIng Jr. I appreciate your compliments and even more so your profound remarks. God Bless You and Your Faimly!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

MonetteforJack— You are quite welcome, my dear. Thank you for reading it. I appreciate your thoughtful and insightful remarks.

I agree with you that I like the MLK of the Fifties and early Sixties better. It almost seems that after he got what he wanted with the Civil Rights legislation, it might have surprised him. And then he might have thought to himself, now what am I going to do? Or work toward? Maybe he felt he had to move the goalposts at that point.

Sir James :-)


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Spirit Whisperer— Thank you, my friend, for such awesome accolades!

I agree with you that those two quotes from the thought of Dr. King are quite deep and wonderful.

Though we may not always succeed in doing what we wish to do; and may sometimes do that which we wish not to do; I see a lot of importance in the striving itself.

And I love the way you put this:

"For me Dr King was supporting the notion that attack was the ego's device and that love was our way back to God. Judging another for any reason was supporting the ego and turning away from God."

Brilliant!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

WD Curry 111— We may all need a hand later, brother.

I loved reading your fine comments. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. As always, I appreciate this visitation from you. :)


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Tamarajo— While I do see how groups who think themselves "oppressed" can lean toward socialism, like you I do not think a guaranteed income for all will solve anything. In fact, I think it a bad idea.

There is plenty to admire about the peaceful protests of MLK and his followers. They did set a great example for future peoples to emulate.

I would like to think that Martin Luther King is looking down from heaven right now and can see what progress has been made because of him and his work.

This world will never be perfect, as you have observed.

Thank you for your outstanding comments. It is always a distinct pleasure to read your thoughts. God Bless You.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Glenn Stok— Why, thank you kind sir. I am glad you enjoyed this piece. It is great to hear from you again.

I enjoyed your comments and I appreciate the visit. :D


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

no body— Wow. Brother Bob, I think your comments have to be considered "Best in Show." You really laid it down and cut right to the heart of the matter. Thank you ever much for this profound contribution to our understanding of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

As you said perfectly well, "just as other patriarchs of the past, Dr. King had some holes in his logic that reflected the pain and hurt of the times."

Yes indeed. Amen!

You wrote so succinctly: "He was a real man, a real man with frailties and idiosyncrasies like any other"

Yes, he was.

I agree with you that, all things considered, "his hero status goes through the roof."

Indeed it does, my friend. God Bless You!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Brinafr3sh— You are surely welcome. I totally agree with your comments. Thank you for reading my article. I sincerely appreciate your gracious compliments. :)


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Polly— Thank you for taking the time to read my article, and for the voted up and across. I also sincerely appreciate your thoughtful and insightful remarks.

I was enthralled reading your recount of that certain Hub where all was well until I commented but I honestly have no recollection of what Hub you are talking about. I do comment on thousands of Hubs. Maybe it is best that I don't remember. :-)

Many stories have been told—and this is one of them.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

poetvix— I completely agree with this statement that you made: "I admire his dedication, faith, intelligence and determination. He was a great man . . ."

And as you said so well, "We all should be judged solely on our character just as he said"

Amen!

I thank you so much for reading my Hub and for your blessings.

I appreciate this visitation and your comments. And you are most welcome. :D


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

picklesandrufus— I appreciate your kind compliments and the voted up. And I have the same hope that you have.

Welcome to the HubPages Community! :D


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Lone Ranger— You probably know that I agree with your comments. Thank you for visiting and commenting, L.R.

God Bless You!

JAW


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Kaie Arwen— WOW! I am blown away by your phrase that says, "The strongest introduction you've ever written"

Thank you ever much, my dear. I so appreciate your ongoing affirmation and encouragement. God Bless You!

J :-)


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James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

phdast7— Thank you! Thank you very much. :D

James


DeBorrah K. Ogans profile image

DeBorrah K. Ogans 4 years ago

James A Watkins, This is an interesting informative presentation on Dr. Martin Luther King! It has the refined undertone style of a news periodical. I believe that it exudes a neutral like quality with the desire to report the documented details rather than express a personalized view! This is another wonderful presentation!

I have much respect for Dr King! I also believe that his primary motivation for justice was his love for the Lord and this is why he subscribed to being a “Peacemaker!” It really does take much more discipline to not just react in anger… Most erroneously equate being a strong man with harshness! Often thinking it means to be hard, rough and boisterous... Responding patiently is a virtue! Especially more so when you are constantly bombarded strategically and the threat of violence is constant… As you well stated: ”Nonviolent protest requires courage, discipline, and self-sacrifice. It is not born of weakness but of spiritual strength. To love and forgive those who hate you awakens "a sense of moral shame in the opponent, and thereby brings about a transformation." Amen! Great point!

There is no doubt in my mind that Dr. King had and encounter with the Lord! His God given oratorical gift is without question! He was endowed with spiritual insight! I believe that he was a rare jewel of his time! Since he was a man of color, prominence and power he was targeted from all angles. There was a shrewd attempt to expose his weaker traits since he was forced to constantly live under a microscope. His rights of privacy were also infringed upon since he was classified as somewhat of a rebel or domestic terrorist…. This served to also further attempt to minimize his sphere of influence and undermine his character…

I am not one at all for politics! However, I do believe that Dr King intimated many and because of his competent dexterous leadership abilities there was a constant vigilance to undermine his credibility… There are many deep seated issues in regards to discrimination and prejudices that are deeply woven into the fabric of our society. Being a woman of color I know firsthand the many stereotypes that continue to persist in the background….. Dr. King was instrumental in making great strides to correct some of those injustices…. Thank you for sharing this most thought provoking presentation! In HIS Love, Grace, Joy, Peace & Blessings!


Pollyannalana profile image

Pollyannalana 4 years ago from US

Ah, well it is someone who attacks us both so just that we do have that in common and although you speak openly too you are not quite the idiot rebel I am and even with Mr King here, he may have loved the Lord but he loved the women too. Even great intelligent men like King and Kennedys' cannot seem to settle for the good they have and that reflects in much of my writing that I think you and others wonder about, lol. King's wife had to live with that shame as did Jackie and could have even been her death if you believe is stress causing cancer and killing. But that is another story.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

DeBorrah K. Ogans— I am honored to have you visit this Hub, my friend. Thank you for your gracious compliments.

I too have a mountain of respect for Dr. King. He was indeed a "Peacemaker," as you say. He was incredibly disciplined. And yes, I agree with you that patience is a virtue.

I believe you are right that MLK had encounters with the Lord. And that he surely possessed a "God given oratorical gift." Dr. King was, as you put it so well, a "rare jewel" "endowed with spiritual insight."

There were attempts to undermine his credibility and expose his flaws late in his career. I think this happened after he and LBJ had a falling out over the Vietnam War. They went from staunch allies to almost enemies.

LBJ felt betrayed a bit. He figured that he had gone an extra mile to help MLK and blacks in general achieve legal equality with civil rights legislation he signed; and to provide financial assistance with the Great Society programs. LBJ thought he got turned on afterwards by Dr. King and other leaders of the civil rights movement. That is a shame.

I sure appreciate you reading my article. Your comments are extraordinary. And you are most welcome.

God Bless You!

James


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Polly— Right, right. Powerful men do face strong temptations to use that power for sex—which is easy to do as women are attracted to powerful men. I am just surprised liberal feminists do not protest it more. When a married Bill Clinton used his power as the most powerful man on earth to have sex with his subordinate barely of age female—clearly sexual harassment if not worse—no feminists seemed to mind at all. I guess if you vote for killing babies you get a pass on utterly sexist conduct. :D

But I digress . . .


DeBorrah K. Ogans profile image

DeBorrah K. Ogans 4 years ago

James A Watkins, This is a most interesting scenario you have presented in regards to LBJ! My respect for DR King continues... Thank you for sharing this! I respect your due diligence in your knowledge of politics...

You have written some informative editorials in the area of politics and seem to stay abreast of what is going on… You stand for what you believe in! This is what I appreciate and respect about you! Since you have been exposed firsthand to a diverse spectrum of lifestyles and cultures I think that this further deepens your insight… For what it is worth I believe that you would be a viable and balanced candidate for the political arena. I also realize that it is a brutal place… Your love and dedication for the Lord would further ground your decisions in principles and result in bringing about more of a balance… However it is only one of your many talents and natural gifts The Lord has given you… May you continue to seek the Lord for HIS will in your life above all else… I know that HE WILL direct your path. GOD BLESS YOU!


Derdriu 4 years ago

James A Watkins, What a comprehensive, engaging, intelligent summary of the political thought of Dr Martin Luther King Jr! In particular, you show great respect for the accuracy of the information which you share on the activist minister's philosophy, which has had such widespread economic, governmental and societal impacts.

Thank you for the professionalism, voted up + all,

Derdriu


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

DeBorrah K. Ogans— You are quite welcome, as always my dear lady.

I would love to enter politics but I am afraid I have a few skeletons in my closet. :-)

As you wrote, "Since you have been exposed firsthand to a diverse spectrum of lifestyles and cultures I think that this further deepens your insight."

I think so too. Not everybody has had dinner with the President and also gone without food. I have been wealthy and I have been dirt poor and homeless. I have friends today who are toothless crackheads and I have friends today who are mega-millionaires.

The Lord has truly blessed me with gifts. Speaking of which, I came across an article about the Black Power Movement and the leaders of it sarcastically called MLK "Da Lawd."

Thank you for kindness, graciousness, and blessings. I always long for your encouragement. God Bless You! You are truly a precious woman of God.

James


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

Derdriu— You are most welcome. Thank you for the attention you have shown to my articles. I am grateful to you for the voted up and the accolades. I sincerely appreciate your affirmation and encouragement of my writing.

Thanks again and God Bless You!

James


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

James,

It has been so very long since my last visit, yet your hubs remain comprehensive, meaningful and professional.

I appreciate the fair and unbiased way you present your subject material and the respectful manner in which you answer all of the varied comments. You are a rare blend of an intelligent gentleman!

I learned a great deal more about MLK whom I have always greatly respected. Voted UP & UABI.

Have a peaceful night, Maria


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago Author

marcoujor— Hello Maria! It has been some time since we have visited. Thank you for coming to see me and for your nice note.

I am well pleased that enjoyed reading this little Hub of mine. I admire MLK too. I very much appreciate the "Voted UP & UABI!"

It made me feel mighty good to read your lovely laudations. God Bless You!

James


buffyhead 3 years ago

what a nice article!!!!!!very impressive!

this article let me know more about Martin Luther King jr

thank you James


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 3 years ago from Chicago Author

buffyhead--- You are quite welcome. Thank you for the gracious compliments. I am glad that you enjoyed my article and found it worthy. I appreciate the visitation and your kind comments.

james :-)


cynthtggt profile image

cynthtggt 3 years ago from New York, NY

A great hub, Mr. Watkins. As I do often glean over the comments made about every hub I just can't help saying that I was particularly moved by the comment DeBorrah K Ogans made above. I just wanted to say that too, as well as let you know that you did succeed at presenting a well-rounded hub as you always do. Thanks.


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 3 years ago from Chicago Author

cynthtggt--- Thank you! Let me tell you, DeBorrah K. Ogans always leaves deep, profound, meaningful comments for me to ponder.

I appreciate your kind compliments. And you are most welcome indeed.

It is always a pleasure to receive correspondence from you, a wise and discerning soul that loves what is good, true, and noble.

James :-)


drmiddlebrook profile image

drmiddlebrook 3 years ago from Texas, USA

Hi James. You've done a fine job with this article, my friend. I was looking for something great to read this month, and I found it in this article. I'm not surprised it was so well done. Your Hubs always seem well-researched and well thought-out; labors of love. I approach mine similarly, so I recognize hard work when I see it.

You wrote: "Even after all of his gains, he hinted that a worldwide revolution against the white man might be liberating for people of color around the globe. He said this would be 'the wildest liberation movement in history' and wrote: 'The storm is rising against the privileged minority of the earth [white men], from which there is no shelter in isolation and armament.'"

I want to believe that Dr. King was strong enough, as a Christian, to continue to promote non-violence, no matter what. A worldwide revolution "against the white man," I hope, was a figure of speech, and not a battle cry. Since I know that without the help/work/vision of many white men, some of whom lived centuries before Dr. King arrived on the scene, I cannot believe he could have been advocating a revolution against any and all white men. That would be inconsistent with his character, and with his belief that all men/people should be valued for the content of their character, and not solely for the color of their skin.

There aren't any words, for me, to describe my love for the work of MLK. What a life. I'm so glad to know we share admiration for his brilliance.

In my home, I have a black/white photo of him, on canvas, waving to the crowd on the day of his "I Have a Dream Speech." In my first novel (Silver) I created a young man, a grade-school student, who--in the New Millennium, quotes Dr. King's wisdom about "Street sweepers" to his classmates as they ridicule and tease the kid during an assembly meeting. They all stopped when he dazzled them not only with the wisdom of the quote (which was appropriate based on what was going on in the room), but also with his delivery of the quote.

I am going to do my best to keep Dr. King's wisdom and his legacy alive and benefiting people as I continue on my journey as a writer/publisher.

Thank you for this.


wba108@yahoo.com profile image

wba108@yahoo.com 3 years ago from upstate, NY

I'm surprised that MLK's held to so many left wing beliefs. He had strong words to say about the evils of Communism. I would think he would have connected the dots and realized that all forms of collectivism including modern liberalism spring from the same pool of anti - Christian thought. Here's the link to MLK's writings on communism, its very good!

http://www.redmoonrising.com/AmericanBabylon/chris...


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