Racial Discrimination in the South

There were separate bathrooms and separate drinking.
There were separate bathrooms and separate drinking. | Source

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln | Source

Discrimination is the unfair treatment of a person or group on the basis of prejudice and without regard to individual merit. I grew up in the South, and I can tell you the Negro was certainly made to feel like a second rate citizen. Even as a child, I knew in my heart this was wrong.

I can’t help but be reminded of Abraham Lincoln and his concerns about slavery in the United States. His efforts toward the abolition of slavery include issuing his Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, encouraging the states to outlaw slavery, and helping push through Congress the 13th. Amendment to the United States Constitution, which finally freed all the slaves nationwide in December 1865.

Even though the slaves were legally freed, it took the Southern states many years to finally treat the Negro with the respect he deserved, and to correct the many problems of years of discrimination.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is a civil rights organization that was formed in 1909. It’s purpose is to eliminate racial discrimination.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Had a Dream

For the purpose of this article I will refer to the race of Negroes by that name. I would not want to offend anyone by this word usage; therefore, I went to Wikipedia to find the proper way to address the “black man”. I am told: “The word “Negro” is used in the English-speaking world to refer to a person of black ancestry or appearance."Negro" superseded "colored” as the most polite terminology, at a time when "black" was more offensive.

One well-known example is the identification by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of his own race as 'Negro' in his famous 1963 speech, I Have a Dream.

Wikipedia further explains: “Since the late 1960s, various other terms have been more widespread in popular usage. These include "black", "Black African”, "Afro-American” (in use from the late 1960s to 1990) and "African American". The United States Census Bureau announced that "Negro" would be included on the 2010 United States Census, alongside "Black" and "African-American" because some older black Americans still self-identify with the term.

When I was a child we referred to the black person as “colored”. Segregation was a way of life where I grew up in South Carolina in the ‘40’s and ‘50’s. It was accepted. We had separate churches and schools. Even cemeteries were segregated. In my town there is a Negro cemetery. It is no longer used, but it is a reminder of wrongful discrimination.

I Was Taught To Respect The Negroes

I was taught by my Daddy to respect the Negroes. I was told not to ever be rude in any way, because as he said, “They are God’s children, too.” I was not allowed to play with the little black children. No white child was. I wondered about that because the Negroes were allowed to work in our homes. They picked cotton alongside the rest of us. We never had servants in my home because we did all our own work. I had a friend who was “better off” than we were. Her family had a Negro lady who came to clean and do the laundry, and the maid's two little children played in the yard while their Mother worked. Her children were not allowed inside the house.

After the work day was over, the maids returned to their homes. It was a common sight to see a Negro lady walking along the dirt road with a huge ball of laundry balanced on her head. She would be taking her white lady’s laundry home to be done at her house. The women usually walked or rode the bus back to their part of town. They had to ride in the back of the bus. They were not allowed to sit with the white passengers. I would ride the bus to go into town some 20 miles away on Saturdays to go to the movie theater. I would see a double feature, usually with Roy Roger, the “King of the Cowboys”. The bus station had large signs to advise which was the “black” waiting room and the separate “white” waiting room.

The drinking fountains around town were segregated. The Negroes had theirs and we had ours. They were plainly marked as such.

Public bathrooms had separate facilities for the whites and for the blacks.

My first job as a teenager was at Woolworth’s Five and Dime Store. I worked at the lunch counter. Negroes were not allowed to eat at the lunch counter.


The Negroes lived in their own part of town. The little three room wooden house I grew up in was in good repair, thanks to my Daddy. The yard was clean and free of litter. The Negroes lived in run-down shacks with rusty tin roofs. Tires were hung from the trees to make swings for the children.

They shopped in our general stores, but we “white folks” never shopped in theirs. My childhood curiosity would loved to have seen their merchandise!

It was unheard of for young people to date anyone of the opposite race. Of course there were no interracial marriages, either.

Hospital Wards And Patients Were Segragated

I graduated from High School in the mid 40’s and left my country home for the city to go to school. I graduated with a degree in Medical Technology. The first hospital I worked in was a small 50 bed facility with no blood bank. We had a list of blood donors we would call whenever we had a patient who needed a transfusion. We kept a list of white donors and a separate list of Negro donors. We were not allowed to give white patients black blood, however; we could give the black patients white blood. There was a belief back then that Sickle Cell Anemia, a disease that only black people got, could be passed to a white person. This is a potentially fatal disease. We know now that is not true.

The beds in the hospital were segregated. Back then we had “wards” that held up to eight patient beds. The hospital wards were segregated.

A Negro Teacher Was Frowned Upon In Florida In 1965

The years went by. I married and had four children. My husband graduated from Veterinary School, and we moved to Florida in 1965. At that time most of the people who lived in Florida were natives and were brought up to believe in segregation. Thanks to Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement in 1967 most schools had been peacefully integrated, but there were still a lot of people who held on to their old beliefs about the Negro being inferior.

I remember very well when the principal of our neighborhood elementary school hired a Negro teacher with a strong background in music and the arts. A majority of the parents were livid and threatened to take their children out of that school. Some of the parents came to his defense and wanted to give him a chance. He stayed at the school for 15 years, and I can thank him for teaching my four children love of music and drama. He still lives in our area, and is well respected and loved.

"Guess Who Is Coming For Dinner?"

In 1967 the movie, “Guess Who Is Coming for Dinner?” was released. A rich white girl falls in love with a black doctor while attending Harvard. Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracey play her parents who have to deal with this unpleasant situation. It won multiple Academy Awards that year, and has always been a favorite of mine.

It Is Wrong To Discriminate Against Anyone

Laws have been passed to protect the Negro against discrimination in jobs, schools, and housing. I am grateful for that. I still think about the way we discriminated against the Negro in the South. After all these years, I would personally like to apologize for the way we Southerners treated the Negro.

We should teach our children that it is very wrong to discriminate against anyone: No matter what race, creed or color.

Let's Teach Our Children To Be Tolerant And To Love Others

Source

Listen To The Words Of This Song "You've Got to be Taught How To Hate"

Listen To Dr. Martin Luther King's Speech

I invite you to read my other articles about growing up in the South. Just follow the links below. If you like my articles, please comment on them and let me know. Thanks.

Do you believe there is still racial discrimination in the United States?

  • Yes
  • No
See results without voting

© 2013 Mary Hyatt

More by this Author


Comments 168 comments

Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

Hello, Mary. Like you, I grew up in the pre-integration era of the deep south and witnessed so many acts of racial hatred in my youth. I remember the separate drinking fountains well. You've covered the time well.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

Awesome hub, Mary!

I grew up in the Deep South and saw this hatred. I was blessed to have parents who did not hate due to race or otherwise, and so my siblings and I were not taught to hate by our parents. Praise Him!

If we do not love, we do not know God, plain and simple, no matter what we say with our mouths, if our hearts hate, then the Lord God is not in our hearts.

Voted up ++++ and sharing

God bless, Faith Reaper


billybuc profile image

billybuc 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

A fantastic and realistic portrayal of life back then, from someone who lived it. This is a very valuable look at a society that cannot be allowed to return. Well done, Mary!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, Randy. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment. Yes, I'm sure if you grew up in the South, you know full well how badly we treated the Negroes. I'm sorry about that....and I think those attitudes are still alive.

So good to see you, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Faith Reaper. You are so right..how can people hate so in their hearts and still go to church on Sunday??? The very people who discriminated against the blacks were the first ones in the door to church on Sundays.

I'm so sorry to see evidence of discrimination that still exists today.

Thanks for the votes, and the share.

Good wishes and blessing back to you today, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi billybuc. I just wondered what part of the US you grew up in to have witnessed discrimination and actually witnessed it. It's a sad commentary on our society today that these attitudes still exists.

Have a wonderful day, Mary


mike102771 profile image

mike102771 3 years ago from Lakemore, Ohio

How about “Sir” or “Mister?” I think your article explains in great detail the idea that separate but equal is never equal. Trying to find a way to separate one group by race, sex, or some other characteristic marginalizes that person and yourself. The saying about not forgetting history so we won’t repeat it comes to mind and maybe this article should be read in every social science class (if they still have such classes).


aziza786 profile image

aziza786 3 years ago

There is racial discrimination everywhere no matter where you are and which country you live in. I never believed racial discrimination was a white problem and they're the ones who pick on the Asians and Blacks, it's not true. Racism exists in any race and I was a victim of racial discrimination too, but that does not make me despise anybody regardless of who they are. We are indeed children of God as you've mentioned in your hub. Racism is a bad philosophy, but then again, it is required so people can recognize each other and learn from whatever it is they want to learn, whether good or bad. Main thing is respect each other.

Great hub by the way and it's a very interesting piece of history of US which many people can learn about and make things better. I am hoping to watching Lincoln the movie very soon. You may want to consider watching also To Sir, With Love, a British movie about a Black teacher teaching English students. Voted up and thanks again for sharing your story.


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 3 years ago from North-East UK

Really enjoyed this hub Mary because you imbued it with so much personal experience. I could not vote in your poll since I do not live in the USA. All I can say that in Britain, there is still racial discrimination.


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida

You have reminded us, mary, with this meaningful hub that it is a sad fact of our nation's history that many of our citizens still hate others who are a different race, ethnicity or religion.

The fact is we cannot legislate against bias and discrimination. Those who want to hate will still do so. But as parents and grandparents we can teach our children to respect others and not be guilty of discrimination. Voted up, m'dear.


xstatic profile image

xstatic 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

Great hub Mary! I grew up in Texas in the 40s and 50s, lived in San Antonio, where racism was present, not as noticeable as it was in the little West Texas town where I spent my summers. There, African-American people had to sit in the balcony at the Queen theater and could not eat in or even go in the front door of restaurants/cafes. They had to order from the back door. There were no water fountains anywhere in town.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi mike102771. Thank you so much for your meaningful comment on my article. Unfortunately, I still see signs of discrimination where I live, and I'm not sure that will ever end no matter what laws are passed. No law can make a person tolerant of others.

I appreciate you reading and taking the time to comment, Mary


Austinstar profile image

Austinstar 3 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

The first anti-discrimination movie I ever saw was "A Patch of Blue" starring Sidney Potier and Shelly Winters. The blind daughter of Shelly Winters meets and falls in love with Potier, not knowing that he is black. Well, of course she doesn't know it, she is blind! The girl is starving for affection since people discriminate against her as a blind woman.

There is all kinds of discrimination. It happens every day and is ingrained in our psyche. Discrimination is a form of survivalism. It isn't going to go away for many generations to come. I suspect it may never entirely go away.

This hub is an accurate accounting of what I experienced in Houston growing up. Although, Houston is a vast, 'modern' city, there are still many segregated areas of town today. They call them 'wards' and 'barrios'.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Jools99. Sorry you couldn't vote..I didn't know readers could not vote because they don't live in the US.

Too bad you have racial discrimination in Britain. I thought from what I have read the people there do have bi-racial marriages.

Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, drbj. You are so right...no amount of legislation will ever stop discrimination. That has to begin at home and in our schools. I am reminded of a little Bible verse that simply says "Love One Another".

If we all loved one another, and if we followed the Golden Rule, we could not discriminate against anyone.

I appreciate your support by reading and the votes, too. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good to see you, xstatic! Sounds like discrimination was really terrible in Texas where you spent summers. I read that some successful Black musicians that toured were refused service of any kind in some southern states. I read of one who was refused at a hotel.

Thanks so much for taking the time to leave a meaningful comment. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Austinstar. Yes, I do remember "A Patch of Blue". Wonderful movie. Yes, I suppose discrimination is a form of survival. It is not limited to any race or country. As I just commented earlier, it is so apparent in the animal world.

I think you are right: racial discrimination will never completely go away because we humans will always hate, sad to say.

I am surprised that Houston has segregated areas of town!

Good to see you, Mary


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

So interesting mary;a wonderful history lesson.

Here's to many more by you and I vote this gem up,across and share all around.

Enjoy your day.

Eddy.


Angela Blair profile image

Angela Blair 3 years ago from Central Texas

Having read this Hub and the ensuing comments -- I must have been a very fortunate child. I grew up in a town of 250 people in central Texas and the world outside our little town was far, far away to children and we had little knowledge of it. From my earliest memories my Granny's dear friend was a black lady named Anna -- they'd been friends since their childhood. All children in our little town -- both black and white -- visited in each other's homes and played together daily and the parents of the home you were visiting were just as likely to discipline a visiting child as they were to discipline their own. Seems I must have grown up in a little "utopia" as I didn't even know the "N" word was a bad thing until I moved to Dallas after graduating from high school. Obviously, discrimination is taught -- and fortunately I missed it. Since that time, of course, I've become aware of racial discrimination and other forms of discrimination in all segments of society. As we now have a half-black president and more than have of us voted for him in order for him to be in office -- I believe that's a huge indication that this country has moved on as far as segregation/discrimination is concerned. Will this mindset ever disappear? Probably not -- and as my heritage includes Native American blood I can testify personally. Best/Sis


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 3 years ago from North-East UK

Mary, I could have voted but as I am not American and not living there, I didn't think it was my place :o) We do have inter-racial marriages and although I live in a very multi-cultural town, we do still have the BNP (British Nationalist Party) -loathesome organisation and we still have racial tensions.


Ronna Pennington profile image

Ronna Pennington 3 years ago from Arkansas

Thank you for your memories about segregation in your state. I'm working on my thesis now, dealing with integration of a small southern community way past that Little Rock Central High incident. I hope more people will do like you -- write their memories about the South's past. We can always learn from what happened before.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

It breaks my heart when I read about the terrible things people did, and do, to other people. Fortunately growing up in Queens, NY, I didn't know anything about prejudice until I was older.

This is a very honest portrayal of what went on and maybe it'll open up some eyes and hearts.

Voted up, useful, and interesting.


Learn Things Web profile image

Learn Things Web 3 years ago from California

Excellent hub! I'm only familiar with what you're saying from TV and movies. Or from the black American perspective in books. It's interesting to read the perspective of a white person who was raised with this. I grew up in the 80's. The extremism of those times is just so strange to me. Although, people my age who grew up in rural areas have told me that discrimination is still widespread.


Angela Blair profile image

Angela Blair 3 years ago from Central Texas

Mary615 -- appears my comments were either not acceptable or disappeared into cyberspace as I don't find them here -- so, I'll try again. Let me congratulate you on a well written and researched Hub -- excellent work! I was raised in a tiny, Texas town where we were all so poor we focused on survival and, amazingly, did it as one community. I found that wasn't the norm when I graduated from high school and moved to the city -- boy, was I naïve! Best/Sis


Anna Haven profile image

Anna Haven 3 years ago from Scotland

A really interesting article. I am from the UK and also too young to remember the period first hand, when you witnessed the worst racial discrimination. You described the segregation and inequality of the time really clearly and gave me an insight into the awful injustice which exsisted Thankyou Mary as always your hubs are not only interesting but also educational.


xstatic profile image

xstatic 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

When Duke Ellington and other famous musicians toured, they stayed with local black residents. While they might perform in the hotel ballroom, they could never stay in the hotels in many cities and towns.


livingsta profile image

livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

I will say, beautiful hub. The last picture, brought tears to my eyes. I have never been able to understand why people are / were discriminated on the basis of so many things. It is so heart breaking. At least it is getting better!

Thank you for this beautiful hub. Voted up and sharing!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Eddy. Thank you so much for the nice compliment on my Hub about discrimination. I'm glad you glad it a good history lesson.

I do appreciate your support by reading, commenting, voting and the share.

My best as always, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Angela Blair. You were so fortunate to have grown up without discrimination. It's good you were friends with the black children and your Grammy had a black friend. That would never have happened when I was a child.

I'm afraid some of these feelings and attitudes will never go away, and that's too bad. We all need to love and respect one another.

Thank you for reading commenting (both your comments were fine).

Sometimes our comments do get lost in cyberspace.

I do appreciate your reading and commenting, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Jools99. Thanks for coming back for your second comment. I thought for some crazy reason you couldn't vote cause you don't live in the US. I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed, you know! ha, ha.

See you again soon, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Ronna Pennington. Thank you for taking the time to read and comment on my Hub about discrimination. Good luck with your thesis on this subject.

I just saw a TV show on our educational channel this past Sunday about the Freedom Riders. They were a brave troupe of Negroes who were beaten and terribly abused for standing up for their beliefs. I just read that Rosa Parks (the lady who wouldn't give up her seat on the bus) just died. Interesting people, and one has to admire them.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, tillsontitan. Your childhood in New York was quite different than mine growing up in the South, I'm sure. Yes, it is heart breaking when I think of the way we treated the Negro in the South, and I am so sorry about all that. That's why I'd like to apologize to them if I could.

Everyone should love one another and live by the Golden Rule.

Thanks for the votes and your nice comment. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Learn Things Web. I'm glad you were never exposed to racial discrimination and have only learned about it through books, etc. There are some really good movies: The one I mentioned in my Hub, and also To Sir, with Love, and another: A Patch of Blue.

I'm sure you have seen Gone With the Wind which is also good.

Discrimination is still evident in our country unfortunately.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 3 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

It's amazing to think how far we've come in less than 100 years. Our president is now black and we have many leaders who are now revered regardless of their race.

But it still feels sometimes that there are hurdles to get over. Not that it's impossible but Dr. King's dream is still waiting to be completely fulfilled.

Great hub!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Anna Haven. It's always good to see you! Yes, I lived through a period of history where terrible injustices were done to the Black Man. We treated them shamefully, and I am sorry to be a part of that culture. I'm proud I'm Southern, but not proud of the discrimination.

Thank you for your nice compliment on my work, I do appreciate that. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Thansk xstatic, for coming back for your added comment. Yes, isn't that terrible that famous musician such as Duke Ellington was not allow to stay in the hotels.

At least the Blacks are not treated that way any longer!

My best, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi livingsta. Thank you for your nice comment on my Hub. Yes, I'm glad to have found the photo of the white and black child standing side by side, the way it should be. Discrimination in any form is truly heart breaking; it just isn't right!

Thank you for the votes and the share, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Alecia Murphy. Yes, we have come a long way eliminating discrimination, but we do have a long way to go. I think (although I can't be sure) Robert Kennedy made the remark that one day we may very well have a black president of the United States.

I had not listened to Dr. King's Dream Speech in long time and it was nice to hear that again. You're right when you say his dream has not been fulfilled yet.

Thank you for your nice compliment on my Hub, Mary


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 3 years ago from malang-indonesia

Hi, Mary! How are you today? I hope you always healthy....amen. I really enjoy your hub and I learn much from you. I hope we can live in peace....white, black , Asian, etc. We all the same as human. We have right to live. Thank you very much for writing. Voted up!

Prasetio


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, prasetio30. Yes, thank you, I am blessed with good health and energy! Oh, wouldn't it be wonderful if all mankind could live in peace. The world is full of hatred. If only people would learn to be tolerant of others no matter what the color of their skin.

I wonder if the people in Indonesia suffer from discrimination.

Good to see you, and thanks for reading and for the vote, Mary


Angela Blair profile image

Angela Blair 3 years ago from Central Texas

Well, back for the third time -- my first comment wasn't showing up at all when I wrote the second -- old or not I know I can see better than to have missed it! Sorry for all the confusion and again -- I really enjoyed the Hub. Best/Sis


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Thank you very much for writing this interesting hub, Mary. It covers a very important topic. Discrimination is a terrible state of affairs and needs to be eliminated.


Pavlo Badovskyy profile image

Pavlo Badovskyy 3 years ago from Kyiv, Ukraine

This is a part of the history. May be not the brightest one, but it was. Interesting hub! Shared


LisaMarie724 profile image

LisaMarie724 3 years ago from Pittsburgh PA

Wow, I didn't grow up during this time period but you painted a picture of it so well that I feel I almost did. I'm so happy that we have taken such huge steps since those days.


KoraleeP profile image

KoraleeP 3 years ago from Vernon British Columbia Canada

Very interesting, well-written Hub, Mary. I enjoyed reading what it was like in those days in the South. You described it so well that I can totally picture it in my mind. I am so thankful that President Lincoln changed things as he did. I hate rascism and while it still exists and may never go away with hubbers like you bringing it to light in the manner you have, it shows how silly it really is.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi AliciaC. Yes, I agree.....Discrimination is indeed terrible and should be eliminated, but until we as a people love and respect one another, that is never going to happen.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Pavlo. Yes, this subject of discrimination is an important part of our history. I am truly sorry for the way we treated the Negroes, but I am glad that has improved. Just look at the President of the U.S. When I was growing up, we never would have believed that could have happened.

Thanks for reading and for the share. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi KoraleeP. I'm glad you found my Hub on racial discrimination interesting. We have improved our attitude in the South, but we still have a long way to go. Like you said, it is a silly attitude to have because we are all the same no matter what color our skin is.

Thank you for your meaningful comment. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi LisaMarie724. I'm glad you were not subjected to racial discrimination when you were growing up. It was so wrong of us to have this attitude, and I'm sorry about that. We have taken steps to correct this problem, but it is still not enough.

Thanks so much for reading and commenting, Mary


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Mary,

When I was a child in Wisconsin, I was not exposed to discrimination of any kind. When my parents moved to McAllen, Texas in 1960, there were very few Negroes...mostly Hispanics. Yet there were no separate areas...schools, restaurants, movie theaters, water fountains, etc. So I only learned about the type of discrimination you have portrayed from reading about it and hearing about it. It is so shameful!

I just wrote a hub about the art of Charles Criner and what Juneteenth means to him and others. It is good that much progress has been made but obviously we have further to go to totally eliminate discrimination. It will probably always exist and it has to do with other things than just the color of one's skin. Age discrimination, religion...etc.

Great hub! Up, useful, interesting votes and will share.


craftdrawer profile image

craftdrawer 3 years ago

Great article makes us realize that this still exists even today.


seanorjohn profile image

seanorjohn 3 years ago

Hi Mary you have lived through such amazing times. To witness discrimination similar to South Africa and now to have a black president. What an amazing turnaround. I remember as a child in the UK being shocked to see adverts in the UK advertising rooms to rent which said "No blacks or Irish". We too have a shameful history. Thank goodness we live in more enlightened times.


Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 3 years ago from Southern Clime

Lincoln freed many slaves to save the union, not because he wanted Blacks to enjoy the American dream.

Yes, I remember the separate public water fountains, restrooms, and waiting rooms at medical offices and other places. I did not mind the separatism, but I did mind being served last. It was not unusual for 8:00 o'clock appointments to turn into 4:00 o'clock. I hated waiting in an office through the lunch hour. By then, all Whites were served and gone home while blacks had to wait until office personnel returned. Sometimes doctors would be two hours late. The a/c was turned off during the lunch hour. So, we sweated until they returned, afraid to go outside for a breeze for fear of losing our positions in the lineup. Yes, we lived the good life! I laugh at all of that now because it is truly comical, but not then.

The best outcome of all of this is to forgive and let go. It really is a good, clean feeling regardless of all of the racism that still exists among all races. I truly love life!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Peggy W If you were never exposed to racial discrimination, I'm sure it would be hard for you to understand what it was like. You were lucky never to have lived with discrimination.

I think you are right when you say there will always be some form of discrimination, but at least conditions are better now for the Negro in the South. They do have better opportunities than they had when I was growing up.

We see discrimination all over the world, don't we?

I'm going to find your Hub on Charles Criner now.

Thanks so much for reading, commenting, the votes and the share. I do appreciate that. My best, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi craftdrawer. Nice to see you. Yes, discrimination still exists today; whether it's the color of one's skin, age, religion, etc.

Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment, Mary


cfin profile image

cfin 3 years ago from The World we live in

People will always think of an excuse to hate. If its not color then its religion. My experience in the US has forever changed my view of discrimination. Discrimination, to me, also includes treating someone differently due to their color. This includes special treatment, like someone is lessor and needs your help due to their ethnicity. As a foreigner, I was treated like dirt in Wisconsin. I am constantly told how i am not allowed have an opinion on the US. No matter what my point of view people yell at me "this is America". I never really figured out what they meant by that.

I have been treated like I only moved here for a "better life". people constantly run down my country and make comments like "do you have toilets in Ireland" or, "you must be an alcoholic", are common place. I always refer people to the human development index and other such indicators of the standard of living in a country. Of course the always get angry.

The way black people are treated here is atrocious. A black guy I know told me that he would have to dress in posh gear all the time or he will be judged. It didn't take long to see as well that black people, white people, and Hispanic people all live in different areas.

Growing up, I knew racists, because they are in every country. the disturbing thing for me here is that they are educated people. the racists at home are usually hicks and don't know any better. It usually stops when they get to know people of another ethnicity.

Myself, my daughter and my American wife are moving back to Ireland next month. The breaking point was when her my laws told me it was hard to accept a foreigner in the family but in their words, "at least I wasn't black". I really don't want my daughter growing up with those kind of statements being the norm. It's a HUGE issue in 2013 in the USA.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi seanjohn. I remember even here in S. Florida up until about 5 years ago, ads were placed for housing and they had the statement: No blacks! That is no longer allowed.

Sounds like you are certainly familiar with racial discrimination where you live, too. When I was growing up, no one would have ever believed we would have a black president someday!

Thanks for reading and adding your comment, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Levertis Steele. I apologize to you for the way you were treated, just like I apologize to all the Negroes I grew up with, for the injustices brought by "the southerner".

It is a good thing you can laugh at this treatment now. You have a forgiving heart and a wonderful attitude.

People just need to love one another no matter what color skin, or religion, etc.

I do thank you for your meaningful comment to my Hub, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi cfin. Yes, people will always find some excuse to hate, whether it is color of skin, religion, or whatever. Maybe that is human nature. We see it even as young children. I have seen it in chickens and livestock, believe it or not. If an animal or a chicken comes into the herd or flock and they are "different", the others will fight him.

I can't imagine your being treated badly because you are Irish! I'm half Irish, and proud of it.

Yes, I think the black people here in the U.S. are treated like second rate citizens, but it is not nearly as bad as it used to be, thank goodness.

Thank you for taking the time to make just a meaningful comment on my Hub on discrimination. Mary


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

I also grew up in the South in the 60s with parents who did not go along with discrimination. They were glad when the term switched from Negro, which is so easily slurred into a negative name, to Blacks when I didn't really understand the change. I can testify that much has changed, but not everything. I really think it never will because I've seen discrimination every where in the world. It seems to be human nature - unfortunately.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi , Kathleen Cochran. I think you are right about discrimination being everywhere in the world. It seems every culture has it's own type of discrimination. It does seem to be part of human nature whether we like it or not. I personally do not like it, but I doubt it will ever be completely eliminated.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Mary,

Keep in mind that since we lived in the countryside of Wisconsin, we were fairly isolated. There might have been discrimination in the larger cities. I was just not exposed to it. Am going to link this to my hub about Juneteenth and the art of Charles Criner. Will be a nice addition to see the perspective of someone who lived through those days and who was not black (Negro).


creativelycc profile image

creativelycc 3 years ago from Maine

Beautiful hub! We are all God's children, no matter what color we are. Everyone's blood is the same color! I am biracial and experienced racism on both sides of the fence as a child. My parents were wonderful and used to tell me and my sister to feel sorry for the people who were racist. They taught us to love and respect everyone. Martin Luther King's dream is being fulfilled, hopefully one day, racism will be totally eliminated.


Sherry Hewins profile image

Sherry Hewins 3 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

When I was a kid in Louisiana in the early '60s the schools I went to were still segregated. My mom was a young widow with 4 kids, and we had a black maid who watched us kids after school. In the summertime she used to take us to her house, a rustic backwoods shack where she lived with her husband, her mom and 8 children. Even though the surroundings I was used to were plain, it was shocking to me, like a third-world country. One summer, my siblings and I attended vacation bible school at her black church with her kids. It was a strange experience, the people were all very welcoming to us. It wasn't until 1968 when we moved to California that I first attended an integrated school.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi creativelycc. I am sorry you experienced racism as a child. You had parents, like mine, who taught you not to be that way. They certainly knew it was wrong. I knew it was wrong at the time, too.

I like to think that these racism attitudes will be eliminated, but humans being human, I rather doubt it.

Attitudes are better now, thank goodness.

Thank you for reading and for your nice comment, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Sherry Hewins. I couldn't help but think when I read your comment about going to a Black church and the welcome you received. Can you imagine if a Black family tried to attend a White church??? I think they would have gotten a very "cold shoulder".

I remember seeing the houses the Negroes lived in, and they were deplorable.

Thanks so much for reading and commenting, Mary


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Mary,

Thanks for the link back to my meaning of Juneteenth hub with the art of Charles Criner. I think our hubs go nicely linked together. Hope you are having a good day over there in Florida. Nice and sunny over here.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa

Mary, this is an awesome and very useful hub about racial discrimination. My country, South Africa, is well-known for its Apartheid regime 1948-1994. Almost 20 years in the New SA (non-apartheid regime), discrimination is still practiced, but now in reverse. Businesses are forced to employ a specific percentage of each race. A white man has now almost no chance of getting a job or promotion; they are compelled to immigrate or to start their own business. Very sad scenario! Discrimination in appointing employees is also the reason of unqualified and incompetent staff and bad costumer service all over the country. One after the other municipality goes bankrupt because of this. I don't say ALL white people are qualified and effective workers, but those who are don't get the opportunity to practice their talents to the benefit of our country.

Strange, but all over the world, when we hear of any incident, positive or negative, something in us WANTS to know the race of the people involved.

BTW, we do refer to blacks, whites, Indians, et cetera and coloreds. The latter is a specific race in SA - the descendants and children of white and black parents.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, MartieCoetser. I have certainly read of the Apartheid in S. Africa. Your statement of the reverse discrimination was interesting to me because we have what is called "reverse discimination". Our colleges and businesses are required by law to hire a certain percentage of Blacks, and the colleges must do the same. In order to comply with the law, a lot of deserving White students don't get into the colleges, and don't get jobs that are opened.

Thanks for reading and for your thoughtful comment, Mary


torrilynn profile image

torrilynn 3 years ago

mary615,

thanks for this hub and sharing

with us the discrimination that you dealt with and

saw with your own eyes.

very insightful and voted up.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, torrilynn. Yes, I did see a lot of racial discrimination when I was growing up, I'm sorry to say. I'm also sorry that I see signs of it's existence still alive even today.

Thank you for reading, commenting, and your vote. My best, Mary


ImKarn23 profile image

ImKarn23 3 years ago

Oh, Mary - i adore your heart, girl! it moves me deeply how you choose to accept 'responsibility' for an entire regions mistakes - too bad more don't!

I am not sure that i agree with the your use of the 'past tense' - as i feel that the south (the whole country?) has not evolved nearly as far as they ought with regard to their racial...'viewpoints..'

it concerns me deeply to hear 'white's' complain about how slovenly, poor, lazy, criminal, etc - the 'blacks' are, and yet- are eager to completely forget that they were - and ARE - slapped down at every single turn..

it concerns me when i hear 'whites' question why THEY can't use the 'n' word - when blacks use it liberally..

HOW can they not understand the simple answer: WE USED IT VERY BADLY, therefore- when we do - it's insulting and offensive..(D'uh..)

Now, of course - we have the boomerang 'reverse racism' - where blacks hate whites even more than whites hate them...

it's only natural - the discriminated against shall inherit the earth, me thinks...perhaps we should have borne that in mind?

we reap what we sow?

wtf am i doing quoting bible stuff? i don't even believe in the bible..LOL..

up and sharing on, dear - have a great weekend..


Cyndi10 profile image

Cyndi10 3 years ago from Georgia

Hello Mary, This is interesting to view racism through your eyes.

Unfortunately, racism is still an insidious part of our society and from the comments, it is a global issue as well.

It is always interesting to see the degrees of overt racism when traveling the South. My experience went from living in a neighborhood that was integrated even in the 60's to separate everything, and no eye contact with someone who was white, especially by a Black man.

Thank you for sharing your experiences. Maybe if more shared and acknowledged that it happened and still happens, African American President not withstanding, we could move farther past it. Voted up.

Take care.


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

Wonderful hub, Mary, and a reminder that--as shameful as our past was (and where I grew up--Mississippi--that shame is stained into the very fabric of the state), prejudice and discrimination still exist even though (in the U.S.) laws provide protection against the horrors of the past.

I was fortunate that my mother's family was not "infected" with the hatred and bias that I witnessed in my youth (and, like you, realized at a very early age was wrong). Therefore, I wasn't infected with it, either. I use the word "infected" because I've always seen racial prejudice as a horrible disease.

As a teenager and young adult, I made enemies by being outspoken about how people in the black community were treated. Looking back, I'm surprised I wasn't paid a visit by white-hooded thugs because of voicing my opinions...especially since this was during the volatile '50s and '60s.

Things improved (on the surface) after passage of the Civil Rights Act and other U.S. legislation to stop discrimination, but old habits die hard--especially in older generations and among under-educated people (of which too many existed then and now in this state). Prejudice is usually the result of ignorance and fear.

Fortunately, there are many people of all ages who no longer subscribe to the idea that someone who looks different from them must be inferior. Unfortunately, that does not include the entire population.

Trends of racial bias during the past few years (not only in the south) make me despair of prejudice ending in my lifetime. As with many movements, however, the actions of individuals can make a difference. Perhaps those of us who believe that all people are truly equal regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, etc. , can counteract the negative beliefs and actions of those who are prejudiced and discriminate, whether overtly or covertly. I hope so.

Voted Up++++ and shared

Jaye


prospectboy profile image

prospectboy 3 years ago from Texas

Very powerful hub you've written here mary615. I'm truly amazed that you grew up during this time, and are able to share some of your experiences from your own life. It really makes me appreciate how far we've come as a country. There are still signs of racism and prejudice today, but we've made great leaps into becoming more tolerant and respectful of one another. Voted up for sure. Great job!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi ImKarn23. I appreciate your reading and commenting on my Hub. Your comment really adds to this discussion. Yes, I do still feel somewhat guilty about the way we treated the Blacks when I was growing up, and we still don't give them the respect that we should, even now. We've come a long way in the South, but I doubt if racial discrimination will ever go away. It seems to be ingrained in us as humans.

Again, thank you for reading commenting and the share, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Cindi10, Yes, I'm afraid discimination is found throughout the world no matter what race. Until people learn to love and respect one another no matter what color the other person's skin, it will always be that way. It just seems to be human nature to "look down" on someone who is different from us.

I see you are from Georgia. I spent time around Atlanta in the 60's and racial discrimination was very bad at that time. I hope it has improved now. Thank your for reading, commenting and for the vote, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, JayneWisdom. I will never forget the movie Mississippi Burning! You are so right when you term racial prejudice as a disease. At least you saw the wrong when you were a young person and tried to speak your mind. I knew it was wrong, but I was too young to protest. I never saw those horrible KKK people, but I heard a lot about them.

I'm like you: I don't think discrimination will be eliminated in my lifetime. Each person can do their part to love and respect the other person, though.

I appreciate your insightful comment, Jayne. Thank you for the vote and the share. My Best, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi prospectboy. Thank you so much for reading and commenting on my Hub about racial discrimination.

We have come a long way toward ending this discrimination, but we still have a long way to go. I can see signs that the problem is improving even where I live, and I'm glad to see that.

Thank you for the nice compliment on my Hub, and for the vote. Mary


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Discrimination of any kind, racial or otherwise, is a sign of the insecurity of certain members of society. There is abundance for all of us and we should learn to respect one another for just who we are. Thanks for sharing, Mary, passing this around.


Pavlo Badovskyy profile image

Pavlo Badovskyy 3 years ago from Kyiv, Ukraine

I believe that the meaning of the word "Negro" was twisted and actually lost its initial meaning. Your qoutes from Wikipedia confirm it. Can we say that society associated the word Negro with all the worst which was in their life ? I think we can. The word itself is nothing. The attitude is important. In the USSR we also said "Negroes" meaning NOTHING offensive at all. I can say even more - in the USSR in general was a positive approach to them. Coloured people were always associated with slavery, hard work thus from the Soviet citizen`s point of view Negroes were "our friends". Interesting hub!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good morning, Walt Kienia. I would like to thank you for reading and for your comment filled with well chosen words that have added a lot of this discussion of racial discrimination.

Yes, prejudice and discrimination are alive and well today. I still see evidence of that almost every day where I live.

It is a sad commentary on the whole human race. I still believe in the simple Golden Rule, and I try to live by that rule.

Again, thank you for taking the time to read and comment, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi midget38. I can't help but wonder if there is racial discimination in Singapore??? Thank you for reading, commenting, and the share. Yes, wouldn't it be wonderful if we all cared for one another and respected one another, regardless of the color of our skin?

I hope you have a wonderful day, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Pavlo Badovsky. It is so interesting to get a comment and opinion from someone like yourself who lives in a different country. Sounds like the Negro was treated fairly and justly in Russia, and that's a good thing.

Yes, the word Negro itself means nothing: it is the attitude.

I do thank you for taking the time to make a very thoughtful comment, Mary


HSchneider 3 years ago from Parsippany, New Jersey

Wonderful Hub, Mary. Thank you for your portrait of growing up in the Jim Crow South. We truly have come a long way as has the South. There is still much work to be done. I believe our younger generation is much more tolerant and I hope this trend continues. I also hope the Supreme Court upholds the Voting Rights Act. The powers that be, especially in the South, love their power. Making voting more difficult for African-Americans would serve these purposes. Actually, it should be extended nationwide


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, HSchneider. Nice to "meet you" here today. Yes, I think our younger generation is more tolerant of other people with skin color that is different from their own. It was a terrible time to be a Black man back when I was growing up. Even now, life is not easy for them for many reasons. At least now, the Blacks have more opportunities IF they want to take advantage of them.

I do thank you for your meaningful comment. Hope to see you again, Mary


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 3 years ago

Mary, I have seen discrimination in all part of the country and in many forms. It is sad. Thank you for being an advocate for human rights and for the better treatment of all people. It is a learned trait: prejudism. We have to teach our children to respect others when they are young so that they can promote it all their life. Well done! Blessings to you.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, teaches12345. Thanks so much for reading and for the nice compliment. Yes, prejudice is certainly a learned trait. I tried to teach my children to love everyone and to live by the Golden Rule. If we loved one another, there could be no discrimination.

Hope you have a wonderful day, Mary


ajwrites57 profile image

ajwrites57 3 years ago from Pennsylvania

mary615 , very interesting and thoughtful hub. It's shocking to think this was the state of affairs just 50 years ago. Thanks for sharing your personal insights. Unfortunately racial discrimination still exists among both black and white. Thanks again! :o)


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

Racial issue is also deeply etched in eastern society. After the end of 10 years of armed conflict and end of monarchical rule, racial divide is growing deeper in my country.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, ajwrites57. Thanks for reading and I'm glad you found my Hub on racial discrimination an interesting one. Yes, these are shocking facts as I recalled them , and yes , discrimination still exists. I'm not sure that will ever change!

Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Vinaya Ghimire. I read about all the discrimination and conflict in your country, and that is deplorable. I think discrimination is found in all parts of the world, and that saddens me.

Good to see you today, Mary


Que Scout profile image

Que Scout 3 years ago from Sydney Australia

I think the media is the #1 source of Racial-Discrimination in the USA.

Anyone growing up and being told on the hour every hour that they are different would grow up thinking they were different. We need to get the media to self regulate their references to race until we have a generation which has not been subjected to these references.

By media I mean movies, music and rap. By self regulate I mean, remove the references to race - no more white boy, no more Niger's ass, and the hood is gone! - ( unless it is a documentary).

As some of you know I live in Australia, but grew up is the USA. So I feel I can comment. Some of the Hubbers may wonder about the indigenous Australians, some of which where enslaved to work on farms. The Australian indigenous people were treated very badly, ie murder all the blacks in one state, take black babies and give them to white families so the kid will become more British,,, shame. Of course that is all behind us now and few remember but the racism still exists to a small degree. But I promise that I have never seen the media isolate the black Australian, nor our African immigrants!

I like this type of thinking; There are two people across the room, one black lady with a yellow hat and one white man with a red hat. When we refer to these two people we refer as : the one wearing the yellow hat or the red, not the black person or the white person.

Lets try to start our next generation color blind !


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Que Scout. Thank you for your meaningful comment on my Hub about racial discrimination. You are probably right when you remark the media is the main source for discrimination. I never gave that idea much thought.

That's interesting about the Australians: how awful that was!

Wouldn't it be a wonderful thing if people could become color blind when it comes to our fellow man?


Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 3 years ago from Southern Clime

Mary 615,

You do not owe me an apology. We cannot go through life feeling personal guilt about what others in our races did. I have forgiven all offenses done to me, although I still remember them. We all need forgiveness for something. I am sorry for the many crimes Blacks committed against Whites, but I did not do them. Our races are guilty of offending each other, but all of us were not participants or supporters. I am a survivor who craves peace of mind and happiness. Finger pointing, prolonged guilt without a personal reason, or living in the negative past won't help at all. Those are heavy burdens that can be fatal. Even if a person is guilty due to personal involvement, and is truly remorseful, the same should let go of the guilt and enjoy peace of mind. People who do not forgive offenses punish themselves while the ex-offender is free.

I strongly agree that the media has a heavy hand in the way general society behaves.


Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 3 years ago from Southern Clime

Que Scout,

You said, "I like this type of thinking; There are two people across the room, one black lady with a yellow hat and one white man with a red hat. When we refer to these two people we refer as : the one wearing the yellow hat or the red, not the black person or the white person.

"Lets try to start our next generation color blind !"

How can this be done? When I look at a new person, the first thing I notice is race. Race is the primary identifying characteristic of an individual. I suppose if this color blindness is possible, it won't happen in this generation or the next.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, Levertis Steele. Thanks for coming back to add another very meaningful comment on my Hub about racial discrimination. I guess we all crave peace of mind and happiness, don't we?

Let us all just hope the citizens of the world will become more tolerant and learn to love another and live by the Golden Rule.

I hope you have a happy and peaceful day, friend. Mary


Que Scout profile image

Que Scout 3 years ago from Sydney Australia

Hi Levertis Steele

Your last comment may just sum up this hub in a nutshell ..."When I look at a new person, the first thing I notice is race"

We all do. We have been trained to notice the race ( media and whatnot) for little or no good reason. Knowing the race will not change the outcome, so why do we do it. Other character differences , like...weight, looks friendly, looks a bit rough, and so on, are the factors that may have an influence on how we interact with the person. (With the exception of looking for a life partner. hehhhe,)


rasta1 profile image

rasta1 3 years ago from Jamaica

It must have been stressful seeing others being illtreated so blatantly. It still happens today but more subtled and hushed. Unification is the key.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, rasta1, my new friend here on HubPages. Congrats again on your HOTD about your beautiful country, Jamaica!

I am curious as to whether or not there is racial discrimination where you live.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


rasta1 profile image

rasta1 3 years ago from Jamaica

Jamaica is mostly black people with 10% being white, Chinese, Indian. There was a time when only brown people could get certain fancy jobs. The only discrimination is between the social classes, the wealthy and the poor. The dynamics here are a lot different.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi again, rasta1. Thanks for coming back to add another comment. I guess they will always be discrimination of some sort between the races and the social classes.

See you again, soon, I hope. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Walt Kienia. your comment seems directed more to rasta than to me, so I will leave it for him to read in case he returns.

Thanks for reading. Mary


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa

Great hub, Mary. It's hard to believe segregation happened during our lifetimes, but I think we still have a long way to go.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, DeborahNeyens. So nice to see you! Yes, it is hard to believe how poorly we treated the Negro (and I think we still do to some extent). I guess they will always be racial discrimination as long as there is the human race! Yes, we do have a long way to go.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Darknlovely3436 profile image

Darknlovely3436 3 years ago from NewYork

This was a joy to read, however, racism is still here I see it daily in my walk of life...............

nice informative hub..........


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Darknlovely3436. Thanks for reading and I'm so glad you enjoyed my Hub on racial discrimination. Oh, yes, the problem of racism is still alive and well, I'm afraid. It will always be this way until man learns to be tolerant of others and to love one another.

I enjoyed your Hub on the same subject, BTW.


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 3 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

I grew up in central Texas in the fifties and as a small child, I always knew discrimination was wrong; I felt it in my bones. My family didn't overtly hate black people; they just took it for granted that "that's just the way it is."

Sometimes my dad would come home just for a meal and to pick up a change of clothes and if the employee who drove him was white, he would come inside the house and be given a glass of tea, but if the driver was black, he stayed outside. My little child heart would hurt, knowing that someone was sitting outside, not allowed to come in our house.

Every time I hear this old song, I feel that same hurt again:

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/bruce+hornsby/the+way...

“The Way It Is” by Bruce Hornsby

“Said, 'Hey little boy you can't go

Where the others go

Cause you don't look like they do'

Said, 'Hey, old man how can you stand

To think that way

Did you really think about it

Before you made the rules?' “


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Silva Hayes. So nice to "meet you". I felt the same way you did when I was growing up with racial discrimination....I knew it was wrong. I could feel it in my heart just like you.

Thanks for reading and commenting and for the lyrics of that wonderful old song. It is so meaningful.

Hope to see you again soon, Mary


Que Scout profile image

Que Scout 3 years ago from Sydney Australia

Hi Mary

This is left field, and off topic - sort of

I noticed one of your earlier experiences was working at Woolworths 5 and dime. The #1 biggest company in Australia is Woolworths. It is a 100% Oz company in the retail business, mostly supermarkets. A while back I checked Wikipedia where it was noted the Australian who owned the company could not think of a name. The owner visited the USA, saw Woolworths America, thought the name was good and took the name for himself.

Back on topic: I wonder if there were yet and even pailer race than the European, if that race would enslaved the Europeans :)


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Que Scout. Interesting comment about Woolworth's. That was the first job I ever had. We don't have Woolworth's anymore (I don't think).

Our Woolworth didn't sell food, but miscellaneous sundries.

Interesting point about a paler race. Who knows??

Thanks for the visit, always good to see you, Mary


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 3 years ago from California

Really impressive hub Mary--it feels a bit to me like an interview actually--and somehow that seems really appropriate--Look how far we have come and how far we still have to go---


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi AudreyHowitt. Yes, we have come a long way since those days when I was growing up, but I expect there will always be racial discrimination to some extent.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 3 years ago

"Discrimination is the unfair treatment of a person or group on the basis of prejudice and without regard to individual merit."

This is an incorrect interpretation of male group interaction. Prior to 1964, discrimination certainly did exist, but there was nothing illegal or historically wrong with it. Blacks practiced it EVERYWHERE they had an economic advantage (Pullman Porters, labor groups, Negro newspapers, Negro colleges, Negro baseball league, etc.) etc.). White people did too, but not anywhere near to the extant Blacks did. It's actually called 'historical group recognition'. All people in human history practiced it.

'Historical group recognition' was/is the building blocks of all societies in human history --based on racial, linguistic and religious recognition.

Blacks were a free people after 1865. They were Supposed to be a separate & self-reliant people ( Booker T. Washington's objective). They were free -and expected- to build their own towns, cities, industries , political systems (which would entail a tax base produced by Blacks); or, if they truly felt so oppressed, as many infer today they were, they were free to colonized a place in America (e.g. the Mormons).

Blacks were suppose to provide for themselves within the structure and confines of their own male group -- which was the requirement of ALL distinct peoples in human history. From 1865 to 1964 (the year forced integration as created), Blacks consistently chose to migrate to White communities for their economic opportunities and, it should be stated, that White males were under NO legal requirement to hire Blacks. But they did - by the MILLIONS. Between 1900 and 1964, I cannot find ONE example of a Black man employing a White man on a daily basis. That is, White males DID - as the historic norm dictated- provide for themselves within the structure and confines of their own male group.

Compulsory Integration was created by White Christian males in 1964. No people in human history ever gave across-the-board integration rights to another people. White Christians are the only people to ever do this i.e. allow black males (then females) into their status environments. Since 1964, thru violence, intimidation or discrimination,, Blacks, ironically, considering what they marched for, have consistently drove White people out of their neighborhoods, working environments and political environments. And they also continue to get a pass from the MSN on their racism and hateful violence toward White people.

American Blacks today are still the ONLY people in human history to have never achieved a state of self-reliance. HUMAN NATURE REQUIRES THIS. I blame White socialists. They used Blacks to get socialism implanted into America’s political system.

Mary, you are a White socialist? Is that Right?


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

S. Leretseh, thank you for reading and for commenting on my Hub about racial discrimination.

You and I could get into a long involved discussion about this subject, but I just prefer not to do that. My thoughts and feelings are expressed in my Hub. I knew racial discrimination was wrong when I was a child, and I still think it is wrong. Does that make me a white socialist?? I just think everyone should be treated equally no matter what color their skin.]


Writer Fox profile image

Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

How times have changed in America! Look who is in the White House Now. (I guess, today, a black man is allowed in a white house!)


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Writer Fox. Thanks so much for reading my Hub about racial discrimination in the South and taking the time to comment, Mary


Tom Koecke profile image

Tom Koecke 3 years ago from Tacoma, Washington

Hi Mary,

This is an interesting first-person account of racial discrimination in the south. As a northerner, we did not have literal segregation, but there was a type of virtual segregation that existed. There was an area of town that was predominantly black. Even though much of it was closer to a north end school, the school line was drawn such that children in that section of town went to another school despite the need to for bussing to go there.

I also am a bit younger. My first best friend was a black boy named Joe. I don't recall my parents being uneasy about it, and his family always welcomed me. Joe died many years ago. I got to give his mom a hug and tell her how important her family was to me. I'm not sure she even remembered which of his friends I was, because treating all people good was just a way of life for her family.


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Tom Koechke. Thanks for finding and reading my Hub on racial discrimination. I'm glad you had a good friend who was black, and glad you gave his Mom a big hug. I have worked with wonderful black people, and have made some really good friends with them.

I just wish everyone would love one another and treat each person with respect, My best, Mary


Tom Koecke profile image

Tom Koecke 3 years ago from Tacoma, Washington

This is a changing world, Mary. I have relatives who are black!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Tom. Yes, the world is changing, and I like to think it is changing for the better. Many of us probably have black relatives if we only knew.

My best, Mary


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 3 years ago from Germany

Well done Mary! I have read lately the novel "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett and it was just like what you have written here about racial discrimination towards black people. I´m glad the people in this world have changed. Thanks for sharing this hub. Have a great week!


mary615 profile image

mary615 3 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Thelma Alberts. Thanks for reading and for the nice compliment. I read the book "The Help" also and enjoyed. I saw the movie, "The Bee Keeper" on this subject of discrimination. Yes, people are changing their attitude about this, and that's a good thing.


mariexotoni profile image

mariexotoni 2 years ago

Voted up, great read.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi mariexotoni Thank you for reading and commenting on this Hub. I'm glad you found it a great read, and thanks for the vote. Goodnight.


kerlund74 profile image

kerlund74 2 years ago from Sweden

Thank you for writing about such an important subject. I don't live in USA but we have are problems and discriminations here as well. I think every human should be treated equal and with respect.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi kerlund74 I suppose every country in the world has its share of racial discrimation. It's too bad. I agree: everyone should be treated equally. Thank you for reading and for your comment. My best, Mary


manatita44 profile image

manatita44 2 years ago from london

One of the darker sides of life's myriad colours. May your article help or serve as needed in accordance with His Will.


CrisSp profile image

CrisSp 2 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

This is one important topic then and even now. I am an active advocate of diversity at work and this primitive thinking of discrimination sadly still exists. Our role is to continue to educate people and hopefully the time will come for everyone to embrace everybody.

Voting up and absolutely sharing.

By the way, they call me yellow! :)


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, CrisSp Yes, discrimination exists in every culture, it seems. Too bad people can't just love one another, and live by the Golden Rule!

Thanks for the votes and the share. My best, Mary


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 2 years ago

"Primitive" race-consciousness and/or ethnocentrism is indeed such a despicable and EVIL thing - de facto Nazism. Here are a few of my suggestions to clean up America - and the world.

--American CHINATOWNS... Why on earth has America tolerated all this race-consciousness and/or ethnocentrism?! Chinese are, based on my observation, the WORST offenders of a people failing to integrate & diversify! ... and thereby failing to live the beauty, splendor and wonderment of diversity. We have a police force and a strong military to diversity the Chinatowns all across America. In fact, the name "Chinatown" conjures up an image of ethnocentrism. It should be BANNED. In fact, all names that conjure up an image of ethnocentrism should be banned. e.g. names like " Little Korea", "Little Saigon". I also think the country of China MUST be diversified. America should NOT do business with China -- and no immigrants tolerated...until they diversify. I'm quite sure that a few million people in Africa would love to immigrate to China. Think of how quickly China would advance with an open-door policy of racial immigration. Today, in my book, China remains a backward racist country for failing to diversity. Current 'terrible offender' status!

Here are some other ethnic/racial groups failing to do what American White Christians have done since the 60s.

--Jewish communities - particularly the Orthodox Jewish community, hv miserably FAILED to diversity. Jewish people (all White) I think use their "group" to arrange business deals exclusively for their own group members. The Jewish group MUST be diversified! Current 'terrible offender' status! Also, today the American Jewish group has become - by a very WIDE margin -- the richest group per capita the human race has ever known. Hmmm. A lack of diversity certainly hasn't hurt this group financially. Police and/or our military should monitor temples and social group activities of this group and make sure that all races are present in this group. DIVERSITY IS KING! oops, I mean QUEEN...

--Latin Communities...America's new up & comers who fail the diversity meter. Every worker in America should be taxed at least $100 a month to create a - socialist - program to teach (indoctrinate) the beauty, wonderment, and splendor of diversity to this new immigrant group.

Again, the Chinese and Jewish people are the WORST offenders of failing to diversify. WHAT IS GOING ON HERE?!

Let's be brutally honest here. All the racial groups that hv come to America since the overhaul of America's immigration Act in 1966, have failed to voluntarily integrate & diversify in any significant way! As if the laws and morality don't apply to THEM. And all these people from these mentioned groups curiously all overwhelming vote Democrat. Hmmm. Even African-Americans, ironically, hv failed to foster diversity when and where they are the numeric majority -- workplace, school systems, communities - all across America. Sad but true . Oh, I wonder why Mary has yet to condemn what's going on in Compton, CA?

Ok, we've covered all the racial & ethnic groups in America - CHINESE, AGAIN, BEING THE BIGGEST, WORST OFFENDER FOR FAILING TO DIVERSIFY. Now let's get to FEMALES.

Civil rights laws DEMAND diversity. In the workplace and social settings, females all across America are failing to diversify with males. No question about this. Countless times I have been in offices and seen an all female working environment. In professional sports, females are allowed to exclude males! How can this be?! They earn BIG cash prizes and exclude males?! Females can walk in male locker rooms but males are EXCLUDED from doing so in female locker rooms. Females "claim" they hv a right to privacy - BUT MALES DON'T?! Hmm.

AGAIN, AMERICA HAS A MASSIVE POLICE FORCE AND MILITARY. Let's force everyone to diversify. And the WORST offender on the failing to diversify list, the CHINESE, should be our first focus - IMO.


vandynegl profile image

vandynegl 2 years ago from Ohio Valley

I enjoyed reading this hub! You share some great information and have a wealth of knowledge on this topic! I try to teach my children about being fair and equal with other children their age. We live in an area where diversity is quite limited, but I still reinforce treating others nicely, no matter what. Hopefully, my actions will pay off for them!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

S Leretseh Many thanks for your very meaningful comments and your opinion on this subject. You have some good valid points here; thank you.

My best, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi vandynegl I am happy you enjoyed reading this Hub. Like you, I have tried to teach my children the Golden Rule. We must treat our fellowmen equally, I believe.

My best, Mary


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

I see that this hub of yours Mary is getting some interesting comments. Like you, I believe in the Golden Rule and applying it equally across the board. It does not matter if a person is black, white, green or purple! If everyone followed it, the world would be a better place. Sharing this again and giving it a tweet.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Peggy, So good to see you!

I don't believe we will ever come to live without racial discrimination. I can see it alive here where I live. It is a world wide problem.

Thank you for reading, commenting, the share, and of course the tweet!

I hope you have a wonderful day, Mary


Cardisa profile image

Cardisa 2 years ago from Jamaica

Your article made me cry Mary. I am Jamaican so I didn't experience this kind of racism first hand but I read a lot and watch programs about racism. It pains my heart, but I really don't think you have any reason to apologize.

I kinda hate watching movies about that period in American history. I guess I feel that we should move past this. I feel that racism today is kept alive to some extent by black people who have not forgiven or gotten passed the past.

I really that some day soon, this will all be forgiven.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Cardisa I'm glad you never experienced racial discrimination in Jamaica, but I'll bet Jamaicans who come to the US would soon experience it, because they would be "different".

I don't watch movies of that period of history, either. I get very angry and upset about the way we treated the black people!

We still discriminate here in the US!

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

I have that discrimination in my own family. Martin Luther King, Jr had a dream and I still believe it is still just a dream. Some might be a tiny bit better but as time goes by it seems to be getting worse. A huge example of this was what they did with the current president. Another huge emample is the Westboro Church and I do believe there is still very many white supremacists out there walking around the USA. There is a song by Mary Jo Blige that says be color blind to know how to see me. I cannot find that song right now.


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 2 years ago

I want to AGAIN remind people that white people prior to forced integration ... did NOT discriminate against blacks per se. What they (white males) practiced was Historical Group Recognition (HGR). HGR is non-pejorative discrimination (not pejorative discrimination - acts done with the intent to injure physically or financially based on race/ethnicity)). HGR was responsible for the creation of all societies in human history - for it protected the male group's status environments within HIS society. HGR is also responsible for the existence of ALL racial & ethnic groups on the planet. It is a completely normal - and necessary - human trait.

Since it is males (specifically male groups) that create societies(females perpetuate them), females might have difficulty relating to HGR. HGR created America. It also created ALL the political and economic arenas in America from 1790 to 1964. Those of African descent in America, being a distinct people, were suppose to live separate and thereby achieve self-reliance as a people - i.e. thru the insistence by white people across the US for color line mandates , or non-pejorative discrimination. Instead, they marched for integration. Blacks achieved their coveted integration -- the prohibiting of non-pejorative discrimination -- when white Christian males in Congress (and LBJ) magnanimously gifted them the Civil Rights Act (1964). HGR has been illegal in America ever since...


janshares profile image

janshares 2 years ago from Washington, DC

This is a powerful hub, mary615. I'm so glad it came across my feed and that I took the time to read it. You are correct about Jamaicans who come to the States experiencing discrimination. My father, who is Jamaican, shared stories with us about when he came in the late 1940s. He and his buddies didn't understand why they weren't being served at a restaurant, clueless about the fact that they were not welcome there. He tell the story with humor, about how they just sat there waiting and wondering. Anyway, great hub, amazing stories of your experiences in the south. I appreciate the first-hand accounts. Voted up!


Alphadogg16 profile image

Alphadogg16 2 years ago from Texas

This was a very deep and touching hub mary615. I have experienced little petty kinds of discrimination that I just blow, but nothing to the extent of some of this. I too cannot watch movies of that period either without getting upset. Voted up on your hub.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Lady Guinevere, I think you are right; we still have racial discrimination, and I think we will always have it. I don't think MLK's dream will ever be fully realized.

Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, S Leretseh. I must confess I am not at all familiar with the group you speak of; the HGR. I will try and learn more about them.

Thank you so much for your thoughtful comment, I appreciate your taking the time to do that. My best, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi janshares, I remember back in the 80's a beautiful Jamaican girl came to work at the hospital where I worked. She was ignored by all my co workers. They would not eat at the same table! Well, she and I got to be great friends, and we are friend until this day.

I'm glad you took the time to read my Hub, thanks for the votes, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Alphadogg16, hi....Thank you for the nice compliment on my Hub, I appreciate that.

Thanks for the votes, too. Mary


joedolphin88 profile image

joedolphin88 2 years ago from north miami FL

Great and moving hub. The true discrimination allowed in the south was and is in some places still unthinkable and disgusting. It is sad that racism was and in some place is still so prevalent.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi joedolphin88 Yes, it still saddens me to see racial discrimation is alive and well in not only the US, but in the entire world, it seems.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


always exploring profile image

always exploring 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

I still get goose bumps when i listen to MLK'S speech. This brought back so many memories of my childhood. I grew up in a small town in southern Il. We had two black people, one was a woman named ' nigor Ford, the other was a man named 'nigor John. He lived down by the river in a shack. I would see him going around town picking up people's items out of their trash cans. The woman lived next door to me. She was a cook at the Elks club and a dear friend to my mother. She was my babysitter when my mother worked. I think i was four years old, but i remember her well and i loved her. I remember asking my mother why people didn't like them, she told me that their skin was black and some white people looked down on them. I never did understand that. This is a great hub. I enjoyed reading the stories about the racism in the south. Thank God it's not that bad today but we still have the haters. Thank you for visiting my White Thorn story.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, always exploring I can't help but wonder how those two black people felt being the only blacks who lived there. I'll bet life was not easy for them being the only ones in town.

There were many black people in my community. I worked right aside them in the cotton fields and I never found one that was anything but polite and hardworking people.

Yes, thank God people are more tolerant now towards the black man, but we still have a long way to go.

Thanks so much. I'm hapy you enjoyed reading my Hub, My best, Mary


Ann Hinds profile image

Ann Hinds 2 years ago from So Cal

Wonderful post. I find discrimination is alive and well and I want no part of it. My best friend died at 15 because her family had been passing as white. They moved to a more favorable area that was mixed. She got to close to the fireplace and her clothes caught on fire. Had the family not been afraid to stay in our neighborhood, the accident wouldn't have happened. That was in 1965 and the civil rights movement was in full swing. I can't imagine their fear of being outed as "Negro" although it would not have mattered to me. The South was not the only place where discrimination existed. It was alive and well in California too.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Thank you so much for your great comment. Yes, racial discrimination is indeed alive and well. I see it all the time where I live. I've had some very dear friends who were black. I've sat at their dinner tables and visited their homes often.

So nice to meet you today! My best, Mary


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 2 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

Racial discrimination is one of the most illogical actions in which humans indulge (in addition to being cruel, heartless, evil, etc.) We know about atrocities that slaves lived through. I read an account about how young black males were taught by their elders the best way to hold their body to lessen the damage done by beatings. Even after emancipation, just imagine what life was like. Not just forced to use separate bathrooms, eat and drink at separate counters, and ride at the back of the bus, it was extremely risky to do something as simple as walk down the street. One might be able to walk to a convenience store and buy milk and bread and return home without incident, or one might never return home, having been taken out into the country and dragged behind a pickup or hanged if you were male, or raped and beaten or murdered if you were female. It is truly mind-boggling. The members of our society who practiced discrimination back in the 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s, sowed the seeds, and now we, their descendants, are reaping the harvest.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Silva Hayes Even today, black parents teach their children how to behave on the streets so they will not be mistaken for a black kid "looking for trouble". Here in Florida, we recently had an incident where a white man shot and killed a black young man for playing his music too loud.

Thank you for your thoughtful comment on my Hub, Mary


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 2 years ago from Spicewood, Texas

Yes, some humans are truly irrational. Perhaps only white boys should wear hoodies; apparently black boys wearing hoodies appear to be "looking for trouble."


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 2 years ago

White people did not practice discrimination in the 20s, 30s, 40s. They practiced HGR (Historical Group Recognition). White people hired countless millions of blacks between 1900 and 1964. I cannot find ONE example of a black employing a white person between that time frame. White people DID NOT wrong the black race where and when they insisted on a color line. Ridiculous to believe otherwise. Blacks from 1865 to 1964...were supposed to be separate so as to achieve self-reliance. By 1960, blacks had completely given up on self-reliance as a distinct people...and instead insisted, then demanded, across-the-board integration. In 1964 White males gave the black race what the pleaded for - INTEGRATION.

There were over 14,000 black slaveholders in the South in 1860 - almost 30% of free blacks owed slaves in NewOrleans in 1860. Much more information is coming out now about the extent of black slaveholders. One interesting tid-bit... is that they (blacks) were almost all of the slave breeders in America. White males ended the salve trade in 1807. Using simple logic ... White people DID NOT mistreat their slaves - no more than they would deliberately mistreat their horse(s). The cost for a slave was a staggering amount of money - less than 3.5 percent of white people in the South owned slaves in 1860. The lies being circulated today regarding how slaves were treated blows my mind. I encourage people to do their own research.

I was on the Drudge Report today. There is a link to a black mob attack on innocent white people. From that site I was directed to another site which showed hundreds of links regarding recent racist attacks by blacks ... on innocent white people. I was then directed to another site: Imagery of Innocent White People Victimized Since The Civil Rights Act (1964). THAT victim's list is truly staggering to the imagination! Also, since Eric Holder has been US Attorney General...not ONE time did his office pursue a hate crime against "his people".

Mary, have you EVER publicly condemned a racially motivated attack where the victims were white and the perps were black? Just curious...


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, S Leretseh Thank you for reading my Hub on racial discrimination. I wrote this Hub mainly from the eyes of a child who did not understand why the Negroes were treated so unfairly at that time. I do not believe discrimination is right; regardless of which race is practicing it. All men should be treated equally in my opinion, black or white.


Harishprasad profile image

Harishprasad 23 months ago from India

Hi Mary ! This is a very interesting hub that threw abundant light on the racial discrimination. When I was young, I had read a book containing the stories that resembled the facts stated in this hub. When I read that book, I was astonished what extent man could go against man just because of color.


mary615 profile image

mary615 23 months ago from Florida Author

Hi, Harishprasad It has always astonished me to think of how man can hate another man because of his skin color. I wonder if you have the problem of discrimination in your country?? I'm ashamed to say racism is alive and well in the US.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Silva Hayes profile image

Silva Hayes 23 months ago from Spicewood, Texas

Hating someone solely because of their skin color is so irrational and illogical -- it is just mind-boggling. For me to hear an adult pass this prejudice down to their little children is just evil. So so sad.


mary615 profile image

mary615 23 months ago from Florida Author

Hi,Silva Hayes. I couldn't agree with you more: I think it is very evil, too. It saddens me to see discrimination still evident. I wonder if it will ever stop?

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


brian 22 months ago

Black skin would make me look stronger.


mary615 profile image

mary615 22 months ago from Florida Author

Hi, Brian, having black skin might make you LOOK stronger, but it would not make you a stronger man in thoughts and deeds.


S Leretseh profile image

S Leretseh 22 months ago

Mary, "brian" posts under a bunch of different names. He comes into every hub that involves the black race and tries to hijack it with "black skin is better". I've deleted all his comments on my hubs. Now that he's found your hub you will be getting many more comments similar to the one he wrote.


mary615 profile image

mary615 22 months ago from Florida Author

Hi, S Leretseh Thanks for the "heads up" about this person.


brian 22 months ago

I am trying to help white people understand black skin can help them. I want white men to go underccover as black men.

Oreo cops. Oreo bosses and oreo teachers. To help get more productivity out of black employees.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 22 months ago from sunny Florida

Hi Mary I too grew up in the South and was raised to believe that we are all equal...my Momma would have none of the racial slurs or remarks about Negroes in our home. She taught us that not one of us is more special or entitled than another.

We had only one Negro family in our town and I befriended the little girl who came to town with her Daddy on Saturday. We never saw them the rest of the week. I was made fun of because I befriended her and called a "N-lover"...and it just kind of rolled off of me.

Learning to love and care for others while recognizing how special and unique each of us is has been a lesson I am so thankful Momma taught us.

I could write reams on this topic but will only close by saying...well said, Mary.

And no one race shall ridicule or mistreat or in any way disrespect another... Angels are on the way to you today ps


mary615 profile image

mary615 22 months ago from Florida Author

Hi, pstraubie48 I grew up with a lot of Negroes living nearby. I picked cotton right alongside them. I went to their church and loved it! They never came to our church, though. As a child, I wondered why??

I love everyone no matter the color of their skin, as I'm sure you do, too. We are all God's children.

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