The "Gift" of Santorum

Santorum's Social Views

Rick Santorum has been getting a lot of press lately – including this hub and another by me. He’s the conservative’s rising star. He speaks with a fury, a passion indicative of a US presidential candidate at peace with himself and his vision for this country.

Unfortunately, his vision is narrow and ultra right – as in “extreme” not “correct”.

His intolerance of homosexuality and same-sex marriage is well documented by now. As is his view on abortion and women in combat. He has back-pedaled his comments regarding a state’s right to outlaw contraception but has now taken up the mantle against government funding for prenatal testing.

In his view, prenatal testing is provided as a means to “cull the ranks of the disabled in our society”.

What About "Knowledge is Power"?

It’s true that if a woman is given the heartbreaking news that the fetus in her womb might not develop as she’d anticipated or hoped, she might opt for an abortion. Thing is, last I checked, abortion was a legal option in this country. Beyond that, a woman who has received difficult news during prenatal screening, and indeed the medical staff charged with her care, would have the opportunity to prepare for a potentially difficult pregnancy and delivery, to consider intrauterine therapy, to make employment or living adjustments and more.

Bottom line? Not everyone would choose to abort. Some would grieve for the child they would not have, then move on to learn about and prepare for the child they would have.

Conservatives Disagree

Even Sarah Palin – an ultra conservative if ever there was one – is pro-prenatal testing. At least she was back in 2008 when, referring to her own amniocentesis, she said:

“I was grateful to have all those months to prepare. I can't imagine the moms that are surprised at the end. I think they have it a lot harder.”

A lot harder to be sure.

But Rick Santorum, if he had his way, would rip those months of preparation from those women, would prevent them from learning about options available to help make their lives and the potential life within them, easier. Why? Because they might consider an option of which he does not approve.

Normally, the more moderate among us could – and would – simply ignore this man and his extremist views. Unfortunately, he is a presidential candidate who happens to be flying the highest right now. That means he and his words have to be heard – and dissected, debated and, in a perfect world, disavowed en masse.

Unfortunately, the more attention he receives, the more extreme his views have been shown to be.

The Don and The Gift

As the campaigns move forward, part of me hopes Santorum maintains his momentum. My reason is one that Donald Trump, of all people, stated just days ago.

"There's nothing - there's no gift, no Christmas gift that could be given better than Rick Santorum to the Democrats...and, you know, I don't think they believe it's going to happen. But boy, would they like it to happen because that would be an easy election."

Another part of me wants a healthy, even and fair race to the White House. Why? Because if Santorum wins the Republican nomination, my worry wouldn’t be whether President Obama will occupy the White House for another term. He will. As I would hope. My worry, however, would be that a majority of Republicans found the reprehensible, misogynistic, ultra-conservative view of that man to be worthy of the office of the president.

If that’s the intended “gift”, I suggest you hang onto the receipt.

Comments 14 comments

Sooner28 4 years ago

I think your analysis is correct that if Santorum were to win the nomination, it would tell us a lot about the conservative base of the GOP. Sometimes voters take electability into consideration, but many Republicans are looking to the past election where John McCain was supposedly "electable" and then was beaten by Obama.

As a liberal, part of me wants Santorum to win so it will almost ensure an Obama victory. However, at the same time, I'd like to have a reasonable GOP candidate. Sadly though, the current Republican party is not reasonable. And Obama has been recently following their lead by calling for corporate tax rates to be decreased...


Gusser 4 years ago

I have not voted for a RepubliCRAT since Reagan. If Santorum gets the nomination , I will again. Thanks Carter & Obama.


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

Sooner28, I’ve also been disappointed in a chunk of President Obama’s compromises, but then I see ‘compromise’ as part of his personality. Many of us voted for him because he wouldn’t be the “all or nothing” leader Republicans have accused him of being. Unfortunately, Republicans have moved so far right over the past several years, that any compromise this president makes with them is a huge step away from the base. Democrats need filibuster-proof control of the house and senate in order for us to see middle-ground legislation again.

I’m unclear on your meaning about McCain being considered electable and how that pertains to Santorum’s rise. Do you mean that because McCain – as a moderate – was actually unelectable, they’re pulling further right and honestly believe Santorum has more of a chance at the win? If so, then I, too, hope he wins the nomination. Not only will it mean an Obama win for a much-deserved second term but it will also help mitigate my fears about the ultra conservative slant to this process.

Thanks for coming by and commenting. Much appreciated.


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

Gusser, Thank you for sharing your views. I must say, though, I think you will be one in a small minority to vote for Santorum instead of President Obama should Santorum win the Republican Nomination. His extreme views make independents nervous and even cause Republican women concern. He’s made no effort to display a lean toward moderate but has instead pulled further ‘right’ with every new comment he's made. If that reflects your position, then of course you will vote for him. I simply will never see a vote for Santorum as a productive or beneficial vote for the future of the United States.


Sooner28 4 years ago

@LadyQuill,

What I mean by the McCain comment is, many conservatives voted for him because he was a "moderate" and therefore electable. Yet, it did not turn out well for the Republican party.

I don't know if the GOP will just hold their nose and vote for Romney, who, when he actually governed, was much more liberal than conservative. But Republicans already have used electability as a criterion in the past and got burned. So I would not be surprised if they look for someone else.


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

Understood, Sooner28. Thanks for clarifying. I guess the Republicans will have a difficult choice come November. Here's hoping it's an easy choice for independents.


Gusser 4 years ago

When the current President goes around Congress to enact things, THAT is clearly unconstitutional. What will you think when a Republicrat ignors Congress & enacts his agenda? Can't complain if you accept it from this Prez. I want a Prez. from any party that will actually obey the Constitution.


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

I appreciate your opinion but believe this president went 'around' congress by calling it's bluff when they declared themselves in session when they, clearly, were not. We can all be sure that if anything the president did at that point was unconstitutional, the brouhaha about it would not have died down but instead would have been waved in front of our eyes as wildly as his supposed slight against religious freedom.

As for a Republican enacting his agenda, we - and the world - have witnessed the horrific outcome of that. In fact, we're still reeling from it. If that were to happen again, I absolutely would complain.


Gusser 4 years ago

This president has openly claimed that he will bypass congress any time he wants to. The DemoCAN controlled Senate will never impeach their own. He knows he's safe. If Santorum wins & the Senate changes hands, don't complain. I'm sure you support double standards.


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

That's quite an assumption you've made there, Gusser. But aside from the personal attack, I will say again, if this president committed an impeachable offense, Republicans would not be silent - Democrat majority in the Senate be damned. This president has promised to carry out executive branch actions that do not require action from Congress. Could it be a game? If so, it's no more of a game than the one Republicans played to pretend they were in session so the president could not make a recess appointment. They didn't play fair and when he played the same as they did, they cried foul. It sounds like it's Republicans who support double standards.

If you'd like to comment further on the issues, please feel free. If you simply intend to insult, then you should know your comments will be ignored.


Gusser 4 years ago

No assumption was made. Santorum, IF he wins, will use these same " executive branch actions' to take this country way to far right. If you support take illegal action now, you need to support it then too. Most cheering on Obama will be crying when that happens. Wrong is wrong no matter which party you support.


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

On these points, Gusser, we agree. Thank you for clarifying.

It's about what's good for the goose and all that. However, I don't think what the president is doing is illegal. In fact, that's what would make it even harder to see the same tactics used by Santorum, should he get into office. I guess the difference is in perspective. If we believe our candidate is doing the right thing for the country, then we'll cheer for the effort. If we feel the actions will hurt the country, we're more likely to cry foul. It's human nature.

My concerns with Santorum lie in the way he asserts 'god's law' as if that should be the law of the land. Under his presidency, I'd fear a strong attempt to meld church and state. Of course that won't happen, but it will, in my opinion, pull this country further right than even GW Bush's presidency did. As a left-leaning independent, that is not something I would support.


Credence2 profile image

Credence2 4 years ago from Florida (Space Coast)

Greetings, Lady Quill, first I want to thank you for your gracious comment I received from you, recently. You can be I am going to keep the pot stirred as in these times somebody has to.

I wanted "Sanitorium" to win, so that the distinction between Mr. Obama and the Democrats and the GOP, what is has devolved into, can be made clear to anyone that cares to look.

There are many conservatives that root for Romney who are just as much philistines as Santorum, but recognize that the left will react strongly to Santorum nomination, so they use Romney as the so called 'moderate' candidate to gradually do what Santorum would do openly and brazenly. The GOP do not want another massacre at the polls because of misconception of the candidate, a la 1964. They want to bring these flintstone ideas to the America culture in a incremental way, so that we would not recoil in discust.

This is the just the elephant poking its trunk under the tent, the right is anxious to get the rest of its miserable carcass in, but knows that it has to done one piece at a time. It is a trick that we all need to be aware of..... Thanks again, Cred2


Lady Quill profile image

Lady Quill 4 years ago Author

Yes, Cred2! Keep that pot stirred - someone must lest the stew burn! :-)

Your points are spot on and I, too, had hoped for a Santorum nomination (despite what that would say about the focus of some Americans). However, I heard a political discussion just the other day that intrigued me. I'm sorry to say I cannot recall which pundit spoke but his basic point was this -

Assuming Romney wins the nomination but loses the election to President Obama, the Republicans will see his "moderate" positions the same as they saw McCain's moderate positions - as a barrier to the White House. Therefore, in 2016, Republicans will probably feel compelled to field a much more conservative candidate. That, of course, will further frighten independents and moderates, and all but guarantee that the following eight years will see another Democrat in the White House.

Of course, this could all be wishful thinking, and I don't see anything as a guarantee. However, the thought is a comforting one and my hope is that further tugs to the right will encourage harder tugs back to center. And center is where, IMO, we should stay as a country - without a 'win' or 'lose' but rather with that oft-derided idea of compromise.

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