The time Bobby Kennedy jabbed me in the stomach – my brushes with greatness

RFK on the cover of Time Magazine 16 September 1966. Artwork by David Stone Martin
RFK on the cover of Time Magazine 16 September 1966. Artwork by David Stone Martin

I met two US Presidential candidates!

Bobby Kennedy jabbed me in the stomach. I kid you not – he really did!

The occasion was the then annual Academic Freedom Lecture at the University of Cape Town UCT) on 6 June 1966. Kennedy had been invited to South Africa by the National Union of South African Students (Nusas) to deliver the lecture in the Jameson Hall on the UCT campus and I, as a chairperson of the Nusas Local Committee at the University of Stellenbosch at the time was invited to attend as a member of the platform party.

Kennedy was not the only US Presidential candidate I have met. The Reverend Jesse Jackson was another.

This is my little brag about some great people whom I have had the privilege of meeting, if mostly very briefly. I hope you'll forgive me for it and enjoy the read!

Prime Minister Hendrik Verwoerd on the cover of Time Magazine 26 August 1966
Prime Minister Hendrik Verwoerd on the cover of Time Magazine 26 August 1966

South Africa in 1966

Protest against apartheid within South Africa reached a climax in the late '50s and early '60s and was crushed by vicious security force actions.

The Rivonia Trial of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela and others ended in 1964 with them all being sentenced to life imprisonment. They were in addition banned and “listed” and so their words could not even be reported on – they became non-persons across the freezing waters of Table Bay, inaccessible to all except a very few family members. Robben Island became a kind of symbol of repression and those icy dark waters surrounding it seemed to chill the hearts of all who opposed apartheid.

It was a time of fear and loathing, a time of repression when the real feelings of so many were kept bottled up. Security police people infiltrated every organisation, even church bodies, looking out for “subversives” and linksgesindes (left leaning people) so that everyone became scared – it was not safe to speak your mind, better just get on with daily life and scratching a living out of whatever presented itself as a possibility.

It was also the year of the assassination of the Prime Minister, Dr Hendrik Frensch Verwoerd by a man called Dimitri Tsafendas who claimed that a tapeworm had made him do it! Verwoerd was stabbed to death in the House of Assembly, the lower house of Parliament, on 6 September 1966.

A breath of fresh air

Into that dark and dismal winter of June 1966 when so much in South Africa seemed hopeless in the face of the all-powerful state and its machinery of oppression, suddenly this young man stepped off the plane at the airport then still called Jan Smuts in Johannesburg, and with his flashing smile and words of wisdom and hope brought a breath of fresh air, and allowed us to hope again: we were not alone in the world, there were some powerful people who knew, and cared, in the world outside.

So when Kennedy said, in his Academic Freedom address, “Like it or not we live in interesting times. They are times of danger and uncertainty; but they are also more open to the creative energy of men than any other time in history. And everyone here will ultimately be judged — will ultimately judge himself — on the effort he has contributed to building a new world society and the extent to which his ideals and goals have shaped that effort,” we knew what he was talking about.

The Nusas leadership had been vilified by the apartheid government for having the audacity, the sheer effrontery, to invite someone like Kennedy to address students.

The then-president of Nusas, Ian Robertson, had been banned earlier in a crude government attempt to embarrass Nusas and the Senator from New York.

We sat absolutely spell-bound listening to the wonderful oratory of the Senator, which included the now-famous line, “Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”

Again, those words resonated with us as we thought of the many thousands silenced and killed in our own country. It was a great affirmation of the indivisibility of freedom, of the hope that people could, each in their own spheres of life, make a difference. At the time that was not self-evident to us in South Africa.

How did he come to jab me in the stomach? It happened that all of us invited to join the platform party were also invited to meet the Senator in a committee room before the Affirmation of Academic Freedom lecture began. Kennedy though had spent a lot of time doing wht politicians do – pressing flesh in a bar in downtown Cape Town and so was late.

We were standing in a rough circle when he came in and the Acting President of Nusas, John Daniel, was introducing the Senator to all of us when one of those responsible for the arrangements came in and said that we would really have to start. The Senator swung round from whomever he was greeting to follow the organiser and his elbow poked my stomach. He muttered an apology to me but I didn't get to shake his hand as he left in a hurry to join the Academic Procession which was about to start.

The next day, I think it was, he was invited to speak at the residence Simonsberg at which I had been staying until the previous year, so I missed meeting him there. I did go to the home of famed South African industrialist Anton Rupert who had invited the Kennedys for breakfast where a group of students waited for hours to get a glimpse of the famous couple.

Jesse Jackson on the cover of Time Magazine 6 pril 1970
Jesse Jackson on the cover of Time Magazine 6 pril 1970
Bernard Spong (left) and Bishop Tutu (right) talking with Jesse Jackson at the SACC offices, 1979. Photo from Bernard's book "Sticking Around".
Bernard Spong (left) and Bishop Tutu (right) talking with Jesse Jackson at the SACC offices, 1979. Photo from Bernard's book "Sticking Around".
Bernard (back to camera) shaiking hands with Jackson after the sermon. Archbishop Selby Taylor at left. Photo from Bernard's book "Sticking Around".
Bernard (back to camera) shaiking hands with Jackson after the sermon. Archbishop Selby Taylor at left. Photo from Bernard's book "Sticking Around".

Jesse Jackson

When Jesse Jackson came to town I was working as press secretary to the South African Council of Churches (SACC) which was led at the time by then Bishop, now Archbishop, Emeritus Desmond Mpilo Tutu.

Jackson had been invited to South Africa by the United Congregational Church of South Africa (UCCSA) in 1979 and his visit caused a media frenzy the like of which had not been seen in the country since Kennedy's visit some 13 years before. Not to mention the paranoia of the police, who insisted on knowing every move the man made.

In addition to the visits planned by the UCCSA Jackson also attended the SACC's annual conference which that year was held at a Catholic Seminary just north of Pretoria.

Jackson was due to give a sermon during the service which always formed part of the conference. This service was ecumenical, befitting the organisation. It was led by the then-president of the SACC, the Rev Sam Buti, a minister in the black Dutch Reformed Church; the then-Archbishop of Cape Town, the Right Reverend Selby Taylor; and as MC my good friend Bernard Spong, a Congregational minister.

Jackson's visit had been the occasion of the spilling of incredible vitriol by some right wing organisations which had threatened violence. Word had come to some officials of the SACC that a particular organisation was going to send its “troops” to the seminary while Jackson was there.

To counter this a group of SACC staff was organised to patrol the perimeter of seminary’s grounds to watch out for the expected attack. I was one of those chosen to go on patrol and so spent most of the service walking around outside in the chilly, dusty darkness rather fearfully, it must be said, looking out for radical right wingers bent on doing the Rev Jackson some mischief. So I missed much of the service.

A day or two later I was standing on the steps of Diakonia House in Braamfontein, Johannesburg, which housed the SACC offices, where I was waiting for somebody, when an arm draped over my shoulder and this deep, US-accented voice said, “Yo bro”! How are ya doin'?” The Rev Jackson was on his way out and was just greeting me! We shook hands, and he and his large entourage sped off to his next engagement and I did not see him again.

Donald Woods with another great South African, Helen Suzman. From "Looking for Trouble"
Donald Woods with another great South African, Helen Suzman. From "Looking for Trouble"
Image from the site of the University of kwaZulu-Natal. http://foundation.ukzn.ac.za/DonorOpportunities/BursaryandScholarshipFunds.aspx
Image from the site of the University of kwaZulu-Natal. http://foundation.ukzn.ac.za/DonorOpportunities/BursaryandScholarshipFunds.aspx

Some great South Africans I have also met

Of course the visitors from the US were of great interest to us in South Africa as we were somewhat isolated over the years, so there was great glamour in meeting special visitors like Kennedy and Jackson.

For me as a South African, though, I treasure even more the memories of many wonderful people from my own country that I have met, some fleetingly, some more intensively.

My very first job after leaving university in 1968 was as a junior reporter on the Daily Dispatch, at the time edited by Donald Woods, author of the book later made by Richard Attneborough into the movie "Cry Freedom."

Donald was a remarkable man who had made the journey from being conventionally racist in his youth to being outspokenly anti-apartheid and a confidant of murdered Black Consciousness leader Steven Bantu Biko.

Working for him was an incredible experience, and I have him to thank for musch of my writing ability.

Donald had met Bobby Kennedy when the latter was in South Africa in 1966, and had been invited by the Kennedy election team to spend a few weeks with them after Kennedy announced his run for the presidency in 1968.

Soon after he arrived back in South Africa we got the devastating news that Kennedy had been shot. Donald was rocked by the news, having spent some weeks in the man's company and learning so much from him.

I was working at the time on the sub-editors' horseshoe and Donald came in to personally supervise the laying out of a special edition of the Dispatch. We were all working feverishly to put it all together in a way that would satisfy Donald's high standards.

He was working on a headline and suddenly asked, "If a comedian makes jokes, who makes tragedy?" I gave him the word "tragedienne" as he was writing the headline about Ethel Kennedy.

It was a rather fraught evening, or rather, early morning, and one sub-editor made the horrible mistake of cracking a joke. Donald turned on him in a blazing rage and almost threw him out of the building.

Another great South African I had the honour to know quite well was the great Archbishop Denis E. Hurley OMI of Durban. When he was consecrated as bishop in 1946 he was only 31, the youngest bishop in the Catholic Church at the time.

He became an outspoken critic of apartheid, basing his critique of the ideology and practice on his understanding of theology, which was both deep and broad. So much was his theological and liturgical knowledge and expertise valued by the Vatican that in 1961 he was appointed to the Central Preparatory Commission which planned the Second Vatican Council calle by saintly Pope John XXIII. In fact his contribution there was described by one Dutch theological observer as the most important one made to the Council.

For all his brilliancew he was a wonderfully warm human being with a fantastic sense of humour. He was guiest speaker at a protest rally in Durban once and was introduced by the chairperson as "His Holiness" - a title normally reserved for the Pope. A nephew of his dame up to greet him at the end of the meeting and Hurley said to, "And how's the Popes nephew today?"

Hurley spoke many languages fluently and could converse with ease in isiZulu, French, Italian in addtition to English, of course. He also never forgot a name - once introduced to someone he would always recognise the person again even after many years and be able to greet them by name.

I still treasure a book he gave me with an inscription and his signature. He was the closest I'll ever get to a Pope, I think!

Another great South African with whom I have had a very good relationship is of course the "Arch" - Desmond Tutu, who I written about elsewhere and is quite the most wonderful person I have ever known.

Just one story I would like to share with you which shows the greatness of the man. When my ex-wife's mother lived with us in Johannesburg I was working for the SACC. Her name was Thora and she was dying of lung cancer. I had told him about her and he came especially to our house to meet her. Although she was a Catholic she took an immediate shine to him, and I think he to her.

From then on whenever he left to go overseas or to anywhere else by plane, he made a point of coming to our house to greet her on the way to the airport (we lived close to the road from the city centre to the former Jan Smuts Airport). It was a gesture of such grace that I will never forget it - a man with his busy schedule and international reputation taking the time to visit a sick old woman and give her his episcopal blessing. But that is the measure of the greatness of this man.



People are our greatest treasures

I have written here about some of the great people I have been fortunate to know to one degree or another. I think though that we always need to keep in mind that no matter the station or pedigree of a person, no matter their skills or accomplishments, each person is special.

My life would have been greatly impoverished without the caring friendship of so many people. People are the most wonderful gift - and if we treat each person with respect and love we will achieve far more than greatness, we will achieve personhood.

As the great Robert Burns wrote:

What though on hamely fare we dine
Wear hoddin grey, an' a' that
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine
A man's a man, for a' that
For a' that, an' a' that
Their tinsel show an' a' that
The honest man, though e'er sae poor
Is king o' men for a' that


Copyright Notice

The text and all images on this page, unless otherwise indicated, are by Tony McGregor who hereby asserts his copyright on the material. Should you wish to use any of the text or images feel free to do so with proper attribution and, if possible, a link back to this page. Thank you.

© Tony McGregor 2011

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Comments 57 comments

sameerk profile image

sameerk 5 years ago from India

wow nice one


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 5 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY

Interesting stuff, Tony. The only presidential candidate I ever met was Howard Dean. Great Hub.

Rob


William F. Torpey profile image

William F. Torpey 5 years ago from South Valley Stream, N.Y.

While, as you say, tonymac04, each person is special, it is always especially memorable when we interact in some way with outstanding personalities and brush, however lightly, with history. I know how you feel.


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth

tonymac04,

Good read Tony. One is allowed to feel the presence of others, and share.

Thanks for sharing.

claptona


kathryn1000 profile image

kathryn1000 5 years ago from London

Was it at Hammenskraal that the service was held?A wonderful read.Thank you so much.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Sameerk - thanks so much, my friend. Good to hear from you.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Rob - thanks for stopping by and for the kind words.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

William - thanks so much for those kind and insightful words. I apreciate your visit very much indeed.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

John - thank you for the visit and the comment. I appreciate them. It is my great pleasure to share these tidbits from my life.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Kathryn - it was indeed at Hammanskraal! I'm fascinated that you know of it. It has been sold by the church - I think it is now a police college or something. Haven't been back for years.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


lightning john profile image

lightning john 5 years ago from Florida

It's always inspirational to meet a popular person especialy one that is a distinct anchor in history. You have very special experience I'm honoured to read!

Lj


Mentalist acer profile image

Mentalist acer 5 years ago from A Voice in your Mind!

Controversial times call for enlightened focus,an exciting article Tony!;)


amillar profile image

amillar 5 years ago from Scotland, UK

Wow, I loved this one Tony. You've met a lot of interesting people. But as you point out, and as Burns said, "The rank is but the guinea's stamp, the man's the gowd for a' that".


justom profile image

justom 5 years ago from 41042

Always interesting to hear from someone who was in the middle of all that craziness Tony. Desmond Tutu seems like an amazing, brilliant human being. I'm always glad when I get a chance to hear him speak. I always have songs running through what's left of my mind and your mentioning of Steven Biko made me think of the tune Peter Gabriel did about him. I love that tune. Nice work man! Peace!! Tom


Rebecca E. profile image

Rebecca E. 5 years ago from Canada

as always enjoying your hubs, and what a brush with greatness!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

John - I was very inspired by these wonderful people, and of course many others that I could write about! Thanks for the comment.

Love and peace

Tony


GarnetBird profile image

GarnetBird 5 years ago from Northern California

I LOVED the comments about BOBBY!! My great grandmother's name was Rose Kennedy and looked just like the Kennedy Clan cousins. We are rumored to be distantly related; The Loftus clan had a parcel of land in Ireland right next door to the Kennedy Family. What a refreshing HUB! Good work.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Bryan - thanks for the kind words. I appreciate that you took the time to read.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Amillar - thanks for the comment, my good friend! I have had good fortune in meeting interesting people, no doubt. In the right place at the right time?

Thanks again for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Tom - I still have that song on an old 7 inch single, would you believe? Can't play it on anything any more but I can't let it go. That song has meant so much to me over the years.

The Arch is one of my very favourite people. He has just turned 80 and yest still seems to be full of vigour and commitment. I love him and am so proud to have worked with him.

Thanks so much for stopping by and leaving such a great comment.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Rebecca, my dear friend, so good to see you here again! Glad you enjoyed the story.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Garnet - thank you so much for that interesting comment. And for the kind words.

Much appreciated.

Interesting the name "Loftus" - we have a very famous rugby stadium just down the road from us called "Loftus Versfeld", usually simply called "Loftus". Had no idea it was of Irish origin.

Thanks again for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


Triplet Mom profile image

Triplet Mom 5 years ago from West Coast

Ooh I really liked this piece very interesting stuff.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 5 years ago from Southern Illinois

Hello Tony. My you've lived an interesting life. I never mey Bobby Kennedy, but i would have loved to. I also admired D. tutu, he was a courageous man. Thank you my friend.

Love and Peace


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 5 years ago from South Africa

Thanks for sharing your delighting memories with us, Tony. Even though we are part of the crowds, we must never underestimate our influence on each other. Mooi loop, my goeie vriend. Dit is so goed om jou te ken en om myself met jou gedagtes te verryk. Only my best wishes to you and yours.

PS: Imagine, I’m going to meet you sometime during this year in person and I promise you I’m going to feel just like you felt when you met Arch Tutu.


Loves To Read profile image

Loves To Read 5 years ago

Wonderful and very interesting hub Tony. You have had a very interesting life my friend. I have always liked what i have seen and read of Archbishop Desmond Tutu as well as Nelson Mandela My hat goes off to all those who stood proud and fought to abolish apartheid.

May God reward men such as these for their great contribution to humanity.

Love and Hugs


richtwf profile image

richtwf 5 years ago

You certainly lived through some very interesting times in history. Times were definitely not dull but in the beginnings of a journey towards great change.

Thanks for sharing your memories Tony and God bless.


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago

ahh.... now I know why you wrote so well. You were a reporter once, and have probably wrote all your life.

Another good one, Tony. I wished I have something as good as these to brag about... lol.


mysterylady 89 profile image

mysterylady 89 5 years ago from Florida

I can imagine what a thrill it was to be close to these famous people. I know how excited I felt to be in the same room as Saul Bellow and to sit next to Pat Conroy!

Interesting hub!

Did you sign up to get the Writer's Almanac?


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

We've not had any real leaders in America since Robert and John were killed for planning to dissolve the federal reserve. Every U.S. leader except Andrew Jackson that tried to rid us of Rothschild banks has been killed. Jackson's would be assassin. . . .had some faulty pistols :-D

Jessie J. is pretty cool, but IMO, he could learn a lot from Bill Cosby.

Great hub, wonderful stories!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas

It's interesting to look back on brushes with different people and see how they've affected our life. You've had a close encounter with several great folks. Thanks for the tale of your jab in the stomach with Bobby. He was unforgettable. I saw his brother JFK as he toured Key West in a convertible. The motorcade passed right by where we stood beside the street; it seemed as if he looked right into the crowd at us.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Triplet Mom - thanks for stopping by. Appreciate your comment.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ruby - thanks for the comment. Kennedy and the Arch are two of the most inspiring people I have ever come across.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Martie - thanks for such kind words, as always, my friend! I hope we do meet and enjoy a coffee together sometime!

Love and peace

Tony


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 5 years ago from East Coast, United States

Tony - I certainly enjoyed your hub on mixing it up with the great ones. But the story of Desmond Tutu visiting your sick ex-mother-in-law. His kindness and blessings must have been a great help to her, a small thing that was a measure of real goodness. Peace to you, Tony!


Rhonda Waits profile image

Rhonda Waits 5 years ago from The Emerald Coast

Wow that is awesome. Great hub.

Sweet wishes Rhonda


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

LTR - thank you so very much for such a lovely comment. These men are indeed great and made great contributions to a more humane society. Meeting with them was certainly motivating to me.

We are all praying very much for Nelson Mandela who is 92 and had to go to hospital last week after a bad bout of bronchitis. He is thankfully recovering well.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ritchie - the times were indeed far from dull! And we are still in the process of change, of democratisation. I guess it's the work of a few generations at least.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ingenira - well, yes, blame it all on Donald Woods, LOL! I must say that his strictness in certain respects was very good for my writing. He had very high standards and was quite determined in enforcing them. Sloppy work ws noticed and reprimanded for sure. I look at some newspaper reporting and headlines and think how Donald would have reacted so angrily to the sloppiness shown in them.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Mysterylady - it was indeed a thrill! To have been in the same room as Saul Bellow must have been a thrill indeed!

Yes, I have signed up at Writer's Almanack and have already received my first email from them. Thanks so much for introducing me to the great site. Thanks for the emails too! Much appreciated.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Wesman (or should I call you "Todd"?) - thanks so much for the interesting comment. I was not aware of the Rothschild Bank issue with regard to the deaths JFK and RFK. I have recently read a book which makes a powerful case for the JFK assassination to have been a CIA job. Interesting.

Thanks for stopping by, my friend.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Peg - I had just completed a year at university and was home for the vac when my mother woke me one Saturday morning with the news that JFK had been killed. It was such a shock to me. He seemed to represent so much that was good, of course, idealised as young people tend to.

RFK's address in Cape Town was one of the most moving moments of my life. Being there and hearing him was just amazing.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 5 years ago from Stepping past clutter

"...Security police people infiltrated every organization, even church bodies, looking out for “subversives” and linksgesindes (left leaning people) so that everyone became scared – it was not safe to speak your mind, better just get on with daily life..."

Tony, I cannot read this description without feeling physically ill. I experienced a sense of such a climate after 9-11, when men like Rush Limbaugh inflamed sensibilities in the US against liberal minded Americans and again, as the Tea Party rose up around me and described what it meant to be a "real American." In these instances, I imagined such a world and it terrified me.

For you to have lived through such a time- key word, lived THROUGH- gives me hope that right does eventually triumph over might.

Thank you so much. Hugs, Barbara


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Dolores - that gesture was really appreciated by all of us and I know she was very uplifted by it.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Rhonda - glad you found it interesting. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Barbara - it was grace that brought us through it all, no doubt about that! Grace from people like you who helped us keep the light of liberty alive.

Thanks for stopping by and leaving such a super comment.

Love and peace

Tony


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 5 years ago from Nashville Tn.

A glorious and very interesting read, tony! You are a humble and inspiring man. I feel grateful to have this connection with you through hubpages. A movie must be made about your life...peace and much love, my dear friend.


Multiman 5 years ago

awesome article.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Audrey - thank you so much! I really appreciate your kind words, they mean a lot to me.

A movie about me? Well I don't think my life has been that interesting, really, but thanks for the thought! (Thinks to self - who would play me then? - Liam Neeson? LOL!)

Thanks for stopping bgy, dear friend.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Ian - thanks so much for those kindwords! Thanks too for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


amybradley77 profile image

amybradley77 5 years ago

I hope you have seen the movie Forest Gump, or my reference to you and the character he plays in it won't mean anything. Wow, Forest did meet quite a few famous people or have brief brushes with them too. Very interesting isn't that how similar you seem to this character. Anyway, thanks for sharing awesome things on this page for sure! A.B.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Amy - "Run, Forest, run!" Sure I know the movie. Never thought of myself as like Forest, but an intersting thought! Thanks for stopping by and leaving such a thoughtful comment.

Love and peace

Tony


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 5 years ago

Great post Tony. I sat next to Mike Pinarra of the Iron Butterfly but that's about it. God bless Tony!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Micky - thanks for the comment, my brotherman! We all have our moments, I'm sure!

Love and peace

Tony


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

Hey Tony, I just read "The Kennedys" by Collier and Horowitz - great book, that one. I intend to read there book about The Rockefellers too. The book made no claims and presented no theories, but from reading it you would feel like organized criminal groups, and folks like Jimmy Hoffa had everything to do with those assassinations. I was also unaware of how awfully Robert's sons suffered from his death.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Todd - thanks for stopping by. I don't know that book but will look out for it, thank you.

Love and peace

Tony


nifty@50 profile image

nifty@50 5 years ago

Bobby's is a destiny left sadly unfulfilled. His presidential victory would have gone a long way to heal the racial divide in this country, as well as, end Vietnam much sooner. Great hub tonymac04!

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