We the People: Yes, That Means You!

If you had the power to propose an amendment to the United States Constitution, what would you propose?

A balanced budget amendment?

An amendment to limit the use of executive orders?

An amendment that would impose term limits on Congress?

An amendment limiting federal regulations?

An amendment that would prohibit the use of international treaties to govern domestic law in the United States?

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If you had the power to propose an amendment to the United States Constitution, what would you propose?

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These are all subjects of concern to American voters and taxpayers. But what makes you think that you don't have the power to make sure that your voice is heard? Did you know that the Constitution’s Article V was designed to protect Americans against a federal government that has expanded its power at the expense of the states?

Or maybe you've gotten used to federal power being so entrenched in the grip of Washington DC that you didn't realize that the citizens of the fifty states are an integral part of the legislative process. Maybe you didn't know that the power of the states to call a convention for the purpose of proposing amendments to the Constitution is clearly defined in Article V, which explains that Congress is not the sole entity empowered to propose amendments to the Constitution.


Source

Last December, nearly 100 representatives from more than 30 states gathered at Mount Vernon, home of the Father of his Country, George Washington, to begin the planning process to call a Convention of States. The following states have filed or pre-filed the Convention of States applications in their legislatures: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, South Dakota, South Carolina, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Georgia, which on February 21, became the first state to pass a resolution that calls for a Convention of States with the goal of limiting the power of the federal government. What about your state? If it’s not on the list, wouldn't you like to see your state join the others?

In December of 2013, 100 representatives from more than 30 states gathered at Mount Vernon to begin the planning process to call a Convention of States. Currently the following states have filed or pre-filed the Convention of States applications in their legislatures:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Florida
  • New Mexico
  • South Dakota
  • South Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • West Virginia
  • Georgia

Maybe you can't call up the president and speak to him, and maybe you can't contact a Supreme Court justice and express your opinions, but your legislative district has an elected representative who answers to the voters he or she represents. Find out when your state representative will be visiting the district where you live, and make sure you're there. Or call the representative's office to see if there's going to be a town hall meeting on a subject of importance. Then you can express your thoughts on the proposed Convention of States, and find out whether the subject will be brought up in the current or next legislative session.

The Convention of States is a grassroots force that's building momentum across the nation. Volunteer leadership is already at work in 42 of the nation's 50 states. Does your state have volunteers working on this project? Are you ready to join them?

You probably want to learn a little bit about the Convention of States Project, which is the offspring of the Citizens for Self Governance. The group’s goal is to have district captains in place in a minimum of 75 percent of the legislative districts in each state. The district captains will be coordinating the efforts of at least 100 residents within each district. Their purpose will be to contact their legislators and enlist their support for a Convention of States, with a turn-out of at least 25 people showing up at the legislative hearings.  

You don't believe it? You say you never knew that the states have the power to do this? If you don't believe me, maybe you'll believe the United States Constitution: The Congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three fourths of the several states.

Michael Farris, the head of the Convention of States Project, sees this quest as nothing less than the saving of the nation, saying, “If we allow Washington, D.C., to continue on its current course of big government it will utterly destroy American liberty.”

Article V is counting on you.

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3 comments

Jayfort 2 years ago

Both my home state (AZ) and the state I currently live in (OK) are on the list. I support the idea and would supportt all of the proposed amendments you listed above.

Well done. Voted UP and INTERESTING!


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dragonflyfla 2 years ago from South Florida Author

Hi Jay:

Smart states! Thanks for the support and helping to spread the word.


dragonflyfla profile image

dragonflyfla 2 years ago from South Florida Author

Update: Georgia 1st to pass COS!

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