Will the Democracy in Egypt, Tunisia, and Middle East Be Hijacked?

The British built Alvand, now Iranian
The British built Alvand, now Iranian
Ex-British, Iranian Kharg
Ex-British, Iranian Kharg

It is too early to tell. Everyone who loves freedom and democracy are thrilled that the domino effect finally has happened for democracy and freedom in an area of the world that is filled with dictators. It is good for America. The World. Maybe everything will be fine. Maybe Iran and the other jihadists will finally be left on the fringe. Maybe not.

While everyone is rejoicing about dictators being toppled and interim governments formed until elections and those under oppression are finally feeling what freedom is and means, nefarious far right groups are looking for a way to hijack it either in the name of Islam or creating a political party to run in the coming election.

The scary thing about democracy is that political group with a Jihad attitude could be elected into power. Already the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo has said it will be in the coming election.

Egypt's new military rulers took two steps that had nothing to do with democratic reform. They allowed Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the radical Sunni preacher exiled by Hosni Mubarak ,to return home and lead a victory assembly in Tahrir Square where he preached anti-Israeli rhetoric. On Thursday, Feb. 17, the Muslim Brotherhood was allowed to take charge of opposition demonstrations in the emblematic Tahrir Square and given permission to build a platform, after the other opposition parties and movements had been refused. Opposition leaders who tried to mount the platform alongside Brotherhood speakers were thrown off and dragged out of the square without the army interfering. Is any anyone watching? Is the Egyptian military promoting a policy? A preference in candidate that is not a moderate?

For the first time in three decades, Iranian war ships received permission to transit the Suez Canal on their way to the Mediterranean and Syria, and return to the Red Sea and home base by the same route. Egypt's military rulers' permission for their passage was not contingent on an inspection of their freights for banned cargo, which now reveals, the Iranian Kharg was, in fact, carrying missiles for unloading in Syria for Hezbollah. The Iranian ships also stopped in the Saudi Arabian port of Jeddah on Feb. 6. Heavy US and Israeli pressure failed to dissuade Egypt's military rulers from letting the Iranian flotilla through Suez. So now the waterway has been opened wide for Iran to consign heavy weapons deliveries to Syria and Lebanon.

The situation in Bahrain is precarious for the U.S. Iranian agitators have been discovered among the many freedom fighters. Iran would love to somehow have a pro-Iranian government there and oust the US 5th Fleet, which secures the oil the West uses. Iran is using democracy to beat the US at its own game. First, get the current government out and allow the locals to enjoy their short lived freedoms. Then, create political groups and leaders that support Iranian ideals quietly until elected. Once elected, take control. This is already happening in Iraq where much of the newly elected government is pro-Iranian. These groups "true agenda" are well camouflaged to the average voter, just as the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt during the revolution was nearly silent. No so now.

Many of the Arab leaders now see how this American President chooses to work the current uprisings and feel they can no longer count on American support when it comes to the wire. This forces them to befriend a long time foe-Iran. Look no further than Egypt. Mubarak would never had let Iranian warships pass through without close inspection. He would never let the Muslim Brotherhood have political rallies in Tahrir Square, or anywhere.

The dominoes are falling and there is no way to tell how it will play out. But, already the Islamic forces promoting anti-Israeli and promoting a jihad are on the horizon. Freedom can be dangerous. 


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moncrieff profile image

moncrieff 5 years ago from New York, NY

Every country should decide on its own, if it needs democracy (and what kind of democracy).

We'll see.

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