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Ayn Rand is rampant all over Hubpage posts!

  1. 0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    Who just hates her and why--and who just loves her and why?  And I want to hear from those who have never heard of her, too!

    1. Mark Knowles profile image61
      Mark Knowlesposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Never heard of her. smile

    2. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Rand's novels are schlock and her neo-social Darwinist libertarian "philosophy" is worse!

      Her fiction is not included in any respectable college literature syllabus nor her so-called philosophy assigned in college philosophy classes. Possible exception: University of Chicago .

  2. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 8 years ago

    Used to be she was big in the fifties. Used to know people who jumped from one latest best seller to another and accordant philosophy. Reagan loved her and we got Voo Due economics and the S&L debacle. Her latest reincarnation can be partly attributed to the
    current economic bust-out.

  3. kerryg profile image87
    kerrygposted 8 years ago

    I've never read her, though I keep intending to try. She doesn't really sound like my cup of tea, but then, I wouldn't have said Machiavelli did either and he was actually kind of hilarious, so I should get around to reading her.

    Unfortunately, she may be permanently associated in my head with this article, which made me go yikes and then lol and which I go back and reread sometimes when I need to laugh at stupid people who think they're smart.

    My favorite is this probably this one, but there are a number of gems:

    1. 0
      Zarm Nefilinposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Here is the one I found the funniest from that link you shared:

      "lostpainting, Hagerstown, Maryland
      Please note: If you’re overweight, I won’t date you. If you believe in God, I won’t date you. If you vote for Democrats, I won’t date you. "

      1. Misha profile image76
        Mishaposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        I won't date you even if you vote for Republicans Zarm wink

  4. 0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    knol--I always wanted sort of a history of her books here in the U.S.  That explains a few things, briefly.

    Kerry--um, the 'meatbot.'  Now that is high-concept prose for you.  Meat Market & Free Market.  Hmm, they do seem to popularly go together.

  5. 0
    pgrundyposted 8 years ago

    Machiavelli's "The Prince" can be read in an hour or so. Ayn Rand's books could be used as furniture.

    Actually using them as furniture would at least render them USEFUL in some way, which would be a good thing. If you attempt to actually read them you will not survive. Seriously.

    1. 0
      Leta Sposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      smile LOL, Pam--  But then you know what I actually think on this subject.

      Wanna hear WHY (?) people like her and, lol, good arguments why....

    2. Eric Graudins profile image60
      Eric Graudinsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      OK Pam, so I'm not going to survive.
      In the long run, none of us do anyway - whether we've read Ayn Rand or not :-)

      If you make the effort to read Ayn Rand's book "Atlas Shrugged", you'll see many parallels with what's happening in America (and other places) right now.

      Sure, I don't agree with all of what she says. But that's no reason to dismiss her writings totally.
      Just like it would be stupid for me to rubbish the great hubs of Pam's because she doersn'tr like Ayn Rand. cool

      Eric G.

      1. 0
        pgrundyposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Well, as the saying goes, "If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything."

        I do feel that the cult of individualism has been perverted and turned against the individual in the U.S., and I can understand how many see those themes in Rand's books.

        I can say this much about it that's positive: If she got her books published, the rest of us should be able to do the same thing if we set our minds to it.

        To me, Libertarianism seems unrealistic and shallow. I know some great hubbers here who are Lbertarians. I like and respect them--and you too Eric-- but the politics? Not so much. smile

    3. kerryg profile image87
      kerrygposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      I was a Russian major, so length isn't the issue so much as the feeling that her philosophy of life is going to make me want to stab things. wink

  6. Misha profile image76
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    I guess I am with Mark on this. I first heard this name on Pam's comments here, and it keeps surfacing on HP - but based on what I hear here I do not have any desire to buy and read her smile

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Ayn Rand was a quite popular novelist in the 1940s and 50s as I recall. I read her first hit novel "The Fountainhead" (1943) when I was in high school. It was a quite readable book about an idealistic architect whose master work building was modified by the government. In the end he blew the building up rather than have his work compromised.

      "Atlas Shrugged" (1957) came later and expressed the same unrealistic (in a modern industrial society) extreme libertarian theme. My English teachers considered her novels schlock because the characters were cardboard or stick figures mouthing Rand's so-called philosophy. No professor of literature or reputable critic took her seriously. Nevertheless, her novels sold quite well and influenced many people to have a negative attitude toward government. A young Alan Greenspan worshipped at Ayn Rand's feet and bought her so called "philosophy" which she called objectivism.

      Movies were made from "The Fountainhead" and "Atlas Shrugged."


      I suspect Misha would enjoy her novels. Like Misha, Rand was born in Russia and immigrated to the U.S.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ayn_Rand

  7. 0
    Zarm Nefilinposted 8 years ago

    From what I have heard of Ayn Rand she kind of sounds like a cult leader of sorts.  Just goes to show that you don't have to be religious to be authoritarian.  I have good reason to believe she was at least authoritarian in her ways of thinking.

  8. 0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    Machiavelli seemed excessive, but I have unfortunately found he has use on occasion, only when needed, sad.  It's been a while since I read Rand, but I seem to recall silly allegories, and I absolutely want to stab things, yes.

    This nice woman became my fan--and there it was on my hub--another Ayn Rand reference.  ??smile   It's just kinda odd how it does pop up all over.  That's why I'm asking.

    We sure don't want to 'rubbish,' Pam, lol.  But has anybody got a kinda literary criticism answer as to why they like Rand?

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Maybe it's because you look a bit like Ayn Rand, or your avatar does, at least. ??? (Much better looking, actually!

  9. 0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    OH! No!  Say it isn't so, Ralph, OMG.

    That's what I get for saying you look like Ron Ikan (just a nice, ordinary writer guy I know) on another post, lol!  And anyway, this is a running hub joke--Rand references are all over Pam's hub comments, too.

  10. 0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    So what do you do/did you do (if you are retired) for a living, Ralph?  Professor?  Writer?

    Yes--  That is what I heard about Rand and know as well....I remember one quote from a New York Times reviewer was that her books were all about "to the gas chambers, go."

    Not sure Misha would like her novels, lol, for we Are Not To Label Misha A Conservative.  Or anything....  I guess.  smile

    Course, he might like Nabokov?  I actually love Nabokov--his writing is like watching strong arabesques of words.

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      I'm long retired from 34 years in GM's corporate labor relations department; 3.5 years as a Clinton appointee at the NLRB; 5 years with the State of Michigan Unemployment Compensation appeals board; and currently representing claimants in unemployment compensation appeals hearings (and publishing Hubs!)

      Nabokov was a literature professor at my alma mater while I was there. Unfortunately, I missed the boat and didn't take his course! Most of my mistakes in life have been omissions, not commissions! (Others might disagree!)

  11. Misha profile image76
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    Thanks for the lesson Ralph smile

    I still don't think I gonna read her, cause I actually like real literature, and cardboard characters don't fit there...

    Lita,

    I do like Nabokov a lot, he is an excellent writer in Russian, and looks like his English alter ego is appreciated, too smile

  12. 0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    "I can say this much about it that's positive: If she got her books published, the rest of us should be able to do the same thing if we set our minds to it. "

    Maybe so, Pam--actually undoubtedly so, in some form.  Thing is, there are so many people writing these days.  It is often who you know in addition to persistence.

    And sometimes, crap sells....  Same deal as in life.


    Ralph-
    Do you have a law degree, then?  Sounds like you have had an interesting life.  smile

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Nope. But I am certified by the Michigan unemployment agency to represent claimants in appeal proceedings. I completed the unemployment agency's short training program and passed their test. It wasn't hard after voting on thousands of appeals during five years on the state UC appeals board.

 
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