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Gun Free America - How many years until we lose our guns?

  1. NotPC profile image60
    NotPCposted 4 years ago

    http://s3.hubimg.com/u/7640934_f248.jpg
    It appears the government is attempting to slowly remove guns from the hands of Americans. Obviously it will take a long time to get all guns off the street, and it may not be possible at all. Do you think the government will ever take away all civilian guns? How long will it take to remove all civilian weapons?

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Over 200 years of gun crazed people, makes it really hard to pry it from their cold hands.

      It’s probably won't happen until most Americans realize it is the worst financial investment they have ever had and until they have lost,  most everything else.

      1. taburkett profile image61
        taburkettposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        your desire to slander the law abiding gun owners of the nation appears to be more than slightly emotionally charged.
        you obviously do not realize that the only "crazed people" of real life society are those who attack innocent law abiding individuals.
        as a member of the real-life society, I realize that it will never be free from those "crazed people".
        therefore, my investment in fire power is considered a great return on investment.
        this is true because my life and the lives of others that I protect greatly outweigh the small price paid for the guns.
        by the way, if you are ever confronted by one of those evil "crazed people", you better hope there is someone around like me, because I care enough to protect those who cannot protect themselves.
        been there - done that !!!!!!

        1. Castlepaloma profile image23
          Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          People who possessed a gun were 4.5 times more likely to be shot in an assault than those who did not. After experience being in 3 riots and 6 war zones countries. You would better learn to hide like me, because if you had a gun on you, you would most likely been shot at.

          All my world class athletic training and martial arts training would not be able to save you. Even Chuck Norris said if he was being held up by knife point, he would run away. Maybe your not in good enough shape to run and your afraid, so you would use a gun. It still increases your chances of being shot at, because any fool can pull a trigger.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image79
      Rod Marsdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      It would have to be a slow process if it is to happen at all. It is in the constitution and that, as far as I know, was only ever changed once.

    3. RoryColgan profile image61
      RoryColganposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Freedom can't be lost, merely hidden or a period of time.  When men no longer need to kill to eat and to protect, this might be the day that guns lose their importance and disappear.

    4. rhamson profile image76
      rhamsonposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Maryland is trying to enact a law requiring gun owners to carry a liability insurance policy. Is that really directed at the criminal element who acquire them illegally?

      1. RoryColgan profile image61
        RoryColganposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I don't think so, but it appears to save lives, right?  Doesn't it sound comforting to hear that gun owners have to carry liability insurance policies? (Sarcasm).  Do you live there?

        1. rhamson profile image76
          rhamsonposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Yes I live in Maryland and Martin O"malley is poised to make a presidential run in the next election. I am sure he feels the passing of sweeping gun restrictions could play heavily in garnering some votes on a national scale. He is famous in this state for expoiting flash pan issues to motivate his voters.

          1. RoryColgan profile image61
            RoryColganposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I loved the state, at least on the drive through.  Cumberland was beautiful, as is Annapolis.   As I stated in one of my hubs, people need freedom.  It is air to our spiritual existence.  Without freedom comes a break down of human potential.  Most of our inventions came from this time period, and once regulations set in, we lose some of the freedom to improve.  You only have to look at fossil fuels for that truth!

  2. SpanStar profile image59
    SpanStarposted 4 years ago

    Personally I don't believe the government will ever be able to remove all the guns in America. America has been and still is entrenched in violence and guns. All crimes, all killing is not simply coming from those who are mentally unstable. As long as there are those Americans who believe that killing is the only and best solution to violence than guns will always be a part of America's culture.

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      What about Americans who live in rural areas and need guns to protect themselves from wild animals?

      1. SpanStar profile image59
        SpanStarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I'm wondering that perhaps mankind should not take up so much of wildlife property.

        1. bBerean profile image60
          bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          What would you recommend is the appropriate way to deal with one or more armed thieves breaking into your residence and preferring for there to be no witnesses? 

          Once you take away our guns, you can take away anything you want.  What will it be next?  Our land?



          Yikes!  You DO want our land next!  Well, at least you are thinking ahead.

          1. Disappearinghead profile image89
            Disappearingheadposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Ah so you're one those people that needs a gun just in case Obama implements a neo-communist regime.

            1. NotPC profile image60
              NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Never say never... Ha I'm just kidding. North Korea on the other hand...

      2. Castlepaloma profile image23
        Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        “Some towns are becoming more tolerant of hunters than of deer, noting that while guns kill 31,000 Americans a year, hunters kill only about 100, mostly each other. Deer, on the other hand, kill upward of 250 people a year—drivers and passengers—and hospitalize 30,000 more

        Deer kill humans more than all animals combined in North America. I'ts only fair if you kill dear with your car, they get to kill you back, crushing through your wind sheild.

        1. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          More murders are carried out using a hammer than a gun...

          1. profile image0
            JaxsonRaineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            No. More with a gun. Lots more.

            1. NotPC profile image60
              NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I just checked it out and you are right. Guns are used more often to kill. Other weapons are still used quite often though...

              1. profile image0
                JaxsonRaineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Things like hammers and baseball bats are used more often than rifles, maybe that is what you were referring to.

                1. NotPC profile image60
                  NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  ya exactly: here's the article I found: Weapon and Murder Stats

          2. Castlepaloma profile image23
            Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            To kill someone with a Hammer, would take a person with good skillful thrust and with very personal reasons. A chainsaw would be easier yet very messy, coming from a handyman experience.

            Excuse me wail I hurlllll, eruoppp

            1. NotPC profile image60
              NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Rusty hammers would be a pretty gruesome weapon. The victim would die slowly and painfully!

              1. Castlepaloma profile image23
                Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Still a good nail gun with rusty nails, would less trouble for murderer and the victim.
                Oh Boy, My bad thoughts and nightmares are getting sicker with age.

                1. NotPC profile image60
                  NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Mix rusty nails in with cheerios. This would allow you to stay under the radar and take out a widespread area. Or you could always just train like a couple hundred really mean dogs, and then release them in a city. Of course, rusty nails would have to be glued to the dogs for maximum damage...

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image23
                    Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Ok enough,
                    before we both go insane, I can't even watch horror films anymore.

      3. taburkett profile image61
        taburkettposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I do hope the group you call "wild animals" includes those irrationally crazed individuals of the human race also.

  3. wilderness profile image94
    wildernessposted 4 years ago

    I give it only a decade, perhaps two, until any citizen owning a gun will be declared a criminal.  We haven't learned to respect the rights and wishes of others yet, and every year it only gets worse instead of better.  There are and will always be people who believe themselves so much better than anyone else that only they can set the guidelines for a "proper" lifestyle, and every year we allow them to take a little more freedom from us just to shut them up.  For the day.

    A maximum of 20 years.

    1. tammybarnette profile image59
      tammybarnetteposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      They just passed a law in VA against smoking in your car if you have children in the car...I wonder how much longer smoking will be legal...

      1. bBerean profile image60
        bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Depends.  In WA and CO you can legally smoke pot now.  roll

        1. tammybarnette profile image59
          tammybarnetteposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          True...I need to read up on that, do you have any idea how that is working? How are they packaging/ taxing the weed,lol, is it like cigerrettes?

          1. bBerean profile image60
            bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Chaos.  My understanding is that in both cases it was very poorly thought out.  They are now trying to figure out the logistics of manufacturing, distribution, taxation, regulation and intoxication issues.  Might have wanted to think of all that first.

            1. innersmiff profile image79
              innersmiffposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I love the chaos - spontaneous order working itself out. Liberty is like being born again, remembering that birth can be very traumatic for the child. But would we resign the child to a life inside the womb? wink

              1. bBerean profile image60
                bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Are you kidding!  It's dangerous in there!

          2. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Didn't read it all, but my morning paper had an article where Wa. is looking for experts in marijuana.  How to grow, dry, sell, etc.  As usual, the lawmakers passed a law about which they know nothing about and someone else has to fill in the blanks and make it work.

            1. NotPC profile image60
              NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              That's a shame it wasn't legalized in Oregon. I was really surprised honestly! Down here in Colorado the legalization has been an overwhelming success. I had our town's Sheriff over for dinner a few nights ago, he's my neighbor and we attend the same church (small town lol), and he was telling me how great it is to not have to spend time busting potheads so they can focus on stopping dangerous crimes. I have a lot of hope that the Oregonians against legalization will see how legalization has benefited Colorado and Washington and change there mind the next time the vote comes around. So far, all of the negative aspects of legalization have proven to be wildly exaggerated, though I still feel that both the pros and cons were rightfully assessed ahead of time.

              1. wilderness profile image94
                wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I think the jury is still out, and will be for years, on whether or not it was a good thing.  It will take that long, or longer, to see if we have simply traded the evils of denial of freedom for another class of "alcoholics".  Or to find out if it truly was a "gateway" drug to harder stuff.

                Overall, I expect it to be a success, but we won't know for a long time.

              2. wilderness profile image94
                wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I also know that without nationwide acceptance it is causing grief.  People are coming into Idaho, for instance, and expecting their Oregon medical marijuana card to be honored.  It isn't.  Sellers on the Oregon border have been shut down for selling to Idaho residents, as well.

      2. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        My area has made it illegal to smoke in the wide open spaces of a public park.  Or any commercial building except of a bar or a tobacco shop.  Or any school grounds, including the university here.

        No sane person can possibly that smoking in a 500 acre park is going to harm anyone from second hand smoke, ergo the goal is simply to ban smoking one small piece at a time.  Just like guns.

    2. Disappearinghead profile image89
      Disappearingheadposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      That's pretty much as it is in the UK as only a criminal thinks he needs a gun. Anyone with a gun gets a mandatory five years. Sounds reasonable to me.

      1. NotPC profile image60
        NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Some of us Americans actually need guns because we live in the "wild" parts of the country. We need to be able to protect ourselves and our families from bears and mountain lions. I need to be able to take out coyotes before they eat my chickens. My gun is the tool I use to feed my family. There is nothing criminal about how I, and many of my fellow countrymen use our weapons. I am 100% against using a gun against another human just like any other sane person, but I take care of my weapons and there is no reason for other people, especially other people who don't even live in this country, to tell me that I can't own a gun because some kid's parents didn't properly store their weapons in a locking gun cabinet. All of these mentally unstable children have one thing in common: Their parents were fully aware of their mental disabilities, yet they failed to take the necessary precautions.

  4. diogenes profile image82
    diogenesposted 4 years ago

    Maybe never...or maybe when a president's kids get shot by some nut case with a machine pistol.
    Bob

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Do you think we should be allowed to own our own guns?

      1. profile image83
        Education Answerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Guns will be taxed and regulated into obscurity.  That's how liberals will remove your rights.  They know they don't have the votes to change the Constitution, so they'll simply start making it harder for you to own guns.  First, it will be gun limitations.  Then, additional taxes will be imposed.  Then, you'll have to receive training, etc.  Oh, you'll be able to own guns, you just won't have enough money or time to do so.  It'll end up being like a poll tax.  You'll have the right to have a gun.  You just won't have the money to afford one.

        1. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Dang... I didn't even think about it like that but you're totally right... It's just such a drag for all of us who live in rural areas... It makes sense not to carry a gun if you live in a city just because you have a good chance of shooting something/someone that you're not aiming at simply because everything is so close together. But I need to protect my family from bears and mountain lions out here in the Colorado Mountains. Maybe I need to start training up my crossbow skills!

        2. tammybarnette profile image59
          tammybarnetteposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          The prices are pretty steep now and people are buying them by the truck load...cigerettes have been taxed heavily but people still buy them...

  5. Wayne Brown profile image86
    Wayne Brownposted 4 years ago

    The focus is on guns...not on your rights as a citizen.  That approach will continue as long as it is productive in terms of taking away your rights. ~WB

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I really feel it comes down to city people vs. rural people. In a general sense anyways... I know there are gonna be city people who support gun rights and rural folk against them, but Americans are very polarized and it seems like much of the disconnect come from population relative to the place you call home. Guns are understandably more dangerous in a city and so city dwellers tend to have a poor opinion of guns. They can't go out into their backyard and set up a practice target. We who use guns on a regular basis have learned to respect them and understand they are a tool, not a toy. I would even go as far as to argue that if you truly have respect for your gun, it is no longer a weapon. It just doesn't make sense to me that because gang members and those with mental disabilities misuse guns, that we should be forced to "fight" for our god given rights to protect ourselves. If I was in trouble and called the police, I'd be waiting for about 30 minutes before they got out to my neck of the woods, and that's if the roads are clear. Us country folk have to be our own police.

      1. tammybarnette profile image59
        tammybarnetteposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I would more feel a need to own a weapon in the city myself, that's where most of the crime happens...

        1. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Well I suppose that argument could definitely be made! I was just making the point that where I live, I would never have a reason to use a weapon against another human being. I do however need to have a gun to protect my family from wild animals that see my children as a delicious meal. I would not disagree that something needs to be done about the sheer volume of weaponry that exists within the fragile city environments of America. All humans, criminals included, should be able to muster enough common sense that pulling a firearm on a fellow human being is inherently wrong. Hungry mountain lions on the other hand are sometimes difficult to reason with...

      2. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I think it goes far deeper than that.  IMO, and in a very general way, people in the city want government, want control.  Rural people just want government out of their lives, want independence and freedom to do as they wish.

        I know it's stereotyping individuals based on the group, but you can see than in the red state - blue state map as well.

        1. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          It may be stereotyping, but it's really not that far off. I've lived in the mountains for most of my life, but I also spent five years living in Seattle. It definitely made me uncomfortable to see people carrying guns around because they didn't have any use for them except to shoot other people.

  6. bBerean profile image60
    bBereanposted 4 years ago

    Not to mention, federally it is still illegal.

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      What is still federally illegal? Sorry I'm not able to trace my way back to the post you're responding to.

      1. bBerean profile image60
        bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Pot.  Although it was "legalized" in Wa and Co, it is still federally illegal.

  7. SpanStar profile image59
    SpanStarposted 4 years ago

    There seems to always be talk about what I want ME, ME, ME.

    We have the right to be American citizens which is to say to do more than sit on our behind and complain. These instruments of death (meaning guns) which have been killing American people not for a couple of weeks or a few months but year after, year after year stems from our lack of concern and certainly from our lack of action.

    It isn't just unbalanced people that killed with guns if that were so we can simply say the entire military is crazy. But we as American people have listened to the people joke about killing and we did and said nothing. For years we American adults and parents knew about the bullying that we were made aware of in our schools and did, and said nothing.

    We cannot deny our fascination with guns and violence-how we love WWE Smack down, UFC cage match, little league parents showing their kids how to break somebody's face. Since we as American citizens find ourselves incapable of stopping the violence that we perpetuate well then maybe the government should take our toys away until we learn how to use them responsibly.

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I definitely agree with you here! Perhaps gun control regulations should be discussed from a location standpoint... It's a very difficult idea because if some people are allowed guns and others are not, what's to stop a black market from developing. Area-specific gun control is not an impossible notion however. We as an American people just need to do some brainstorming to find the right solution. If us mountain men were able to keep our guns under the condition that a gps montitor be constantly attached to the gun, I'm sure my fellow gun owners would have no problem with that. A gps system would double as a personal gun security system, as well as an overall societal security system. If a gun happened to get stolen and taken into a "no gun zone," the gps would trigger an alarm so police could retrieve the weapon before the criminal could utilize the weapon for mischief.

      1. SpanStar profile image59
        SpanStarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        CONGRATULATIONS,

        Your suggestions is what I would call a Real American!

        1. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Is this a genuine comment or are you digging at me for making a silly suggestion?

          1. bBerean profile image60
            bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I am beginning to believe in alternate dimensions.  Nearly this exact conversation is taking place in the forum, "If you could, would you?", simultaneously.

            1. NotPC profile image60
              NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Haha! Well this thread has twice as many posts so invite those guys and gals over here so we can really get this discussion rolling!

              1. bBerean profile image60
                bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                That one just started a few hours ago.  I am just flipping back and forth.

      2. howtolearnmore profile image60
        howtolearnmoreposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Install GPS on every gun? I'm not an expert, but wouldn't that cost a lot of money?

        1. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Ya that was not a legitimate suggestion. I was just making the point that solutions are available. Personally though, I would pay to install a GPS device on my gun if it were the only way I could keep it...

    2. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      ME, ME, ME.  Yes, it's all about ME, ME, ME.

      “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”  Unfortunately the likes of Voltaire are gone, and there are few that concern themselves with the rights, freedoms or wants of others.  Instead it's all about how I want you to live your life.

      1. NotPC profile image60
        NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Could you clarify this comment?

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Sorry - it was not meant to be dark and foggy.

          Some of our ancestors (Voltaire) were more concerned about rights and freedoms of others than about what they would like to see.  Now days, however, the entire thrust is on controlling what other people can or can't do rather on their rights. 

          While it is absolutely true that any society must exert some control over it's citizenry in order to survive as a society, that control should be as limited as possible and Voltaire agreed with that sentiment.  His statement was not about just free speech, but freedom in general.

          Our society, on the other hand, seems far more concerned about what someone else does or doesn't do.  Don't smoke weed.  Don't buy sex.  Don't dance naked.  Don't drink Big Gulps.  Wear a seatbelt.  Don't smoke cigarettes.  Don't drink alcohol where people can see you.  Don't have homosexual sex, or sex outside of marriage. 

          The list is endless of victimless crimes; our societies method of controlling other people "for their own good" or because those with a loud voice don't choose to participate in the activity being banned. 

          The entire gun control debate isn't about preventing killings or we would be looking at the causes, not the tool.  It's about controlling the actions of others, actions that a (large) part of society doesn't participate in, that it fears and hates.  Freedom and rights are ignored completely, while we apply more control to the population, remove more freedoms.

          1. bBerean profile image60
            bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Well stated.

          2. NotPC profile image60
            NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Do you mind if I post this on my Facebook page? I would prefer not to cite this page just because I like to keep my personal life separate from my HubPages. I'll just say I copied it from a very wise person. This posting is seriously a work of art.

          3. AlliOop profile image59
            AlliOopposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            LOVE this! I've always called it the "government as parent" mentality but you stated it so much more eloquently.

          4. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Stop it!  You guys are making me blush.  This isn't wisdom; it's nothing more than anyone can see if they open their eyes.

            NotPC: Post it as you wish, it's public now, although I certainly wouldn't list it as from a "very wise person" or as a "work of art"; it is neither.

  8. AlliOop profile image59
    AlliOopposted 4 years ago

    The government will NEVER be able to get all the guns off the streets. The may be able to take them from law abiding citizens, but the criminals will still have them. If they have no concern for other laws, what makes anyone think they'll obey gun laws?

    1. SpanStar profile image59
      SpanStarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      All that you say is true however it is not just the unstable people who kill. American workers who is stressed on the job kill, a spouse upset with another kill, partners in business kill, rapist  kill, kids kill etc.

      1. AlliOop profile image59
        AlliOopposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        That is very true. I was simply making the point that no matter how stringent gun control laws are, a gun free America is virtually impossible.

        1. SpanStar profile image59
          SpanStarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Well I won't argue that point.

        2. NotPC profile image60
          NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Agreed. The freedom to possess a firearm is very much ingrained in American Culture. As mad as the far right was about Obama winning the election, they would be revolting in the streets if their guns were forcibly taken away.

      2. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I would have to say that anyone so unable to control their reaction to stress as to kill is pretty unstable.  Ditto for anyone that allows themselves to be angry enough with a spouse to kill.  Normal, stable, people don't just cross over the edge and kill.

  9. Paul Wingert profile image79
    Paul Wingertposted 4 years ago

    Firearm (defined as a gun manufactured after 1896 - modern day replicas of muzzleloaders are not classified as firearms) ownership in this present day should be reduced to a privilage, not a right. People in this country no longer rely on his flintlock to bring food to the table and the US has the best military in the world. No more assault weapons or 30-100 round magazines. Gun owners will register their gun(s) annually just like automobiles and will prove that they are mentally stable to own one.

    1. AlliOop profile image59
      AlliOopposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Just so you know, there are still those of us that rely on a gun for food. If I didn't have all the free meat from hunter friends, I'd never make it through the winter and still be able to pay my heating bill.

      However, I do agree that a limit on the capacity of gun magazines is reasonable.

      1. NotPC profile image60
        NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Dang you beat me to the comment by like 30 seconds!

        1. AlliOop profile image59
          AlliOopposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          tee hee..... too quick for ya tongue

          1. bBerean profile image60
            bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Too quick on the draw, huh? wink

            1. Paul Wingert profile image79
              Paul Wingertposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I'm open to sport shooting. What I was refering to is that back in the day, there was no choice on where you got your groceries, you either hunted or starved - especially when heading out west. I'm not anti-gun, I have a couple, but I'm sure we can all agree that thess mass shootings are getting rediculous. The NRA's only answer is more guns! What a great way to generate sales after a tragic shooting! Not supprised when a portion of their board members are CEO's of the gun manufacturing firms. Gotta keep their intrest ahead of public safety.

              1. AlliOop profile image59
                AlliOopposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I agree that the NRA's position is a bit extreme.  But that's what happens when you have such polarized issues. Both sides get so far apart that there's nothing but arguing and nothing gets done. The key is trying to find a happy medium that both sides can live with. It's a sad state of affairs when compromise has become a bad word in American politics.

    2. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I definitely agree with you that assault weapons have no place in the hands of civilians. However, some of us do still rely on our guns to keep fed. It may be an outdated way of life, but I like to know where my meat comes from. I like knowing that the animal was put down humanely. I've been in slaughter houses where dead cows were literally sprawled out on a manure covered floor before they were processed for human consumpsion. I prefer to eat mean that has not taken a manure bath.

    3. taburkett profile image61
      taburkettposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      these rules will never eliminate the evil individual who wishes to assault and kill with a gun.
      but they will restrict the innocent law abiding victim.
      this is what has generated the problem in the first place.
      the revolving doors of the penal system and restricted medical programs return criminals irrational evil doers to the street where they expand their evil attacks on innocent victims.

    4. profile image83
      Education Answerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Paul,

      Do you have to take a driving test once a year?  Wow, you must have some strict laws where you live.

  10. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
    SomewayOuttaHereposted 4 years ago

    at the OP - never.....

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Ha it was just a topic starter. I'm glad to hear you feel this way smile

      1. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
        SomewayOuttaHereposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        canada legislated a gun registry....it's been revoked after a short period (maybe a year or so)...it didn't make a difference either way....it just cost taxpayers' money for both legislation/revoking it....i think people should know how to handle guns however....like having a license/permit to use them...i know some folks in the US believe that it is a right to 'bear arms'...i'd just feel more comfortable knowing that people know how to handle them.  i have 3 and do not know how to handle them...so they stay safely secured away until i figure out what to do with them!  they are my deceased husband's hunting rifles and one is more ornamental than anything else - it's quite beautiful - the wood work.  i may learn how to use them or not and/or give them away to family who would appreciate them and know how to use them.  Me?for now i'm just safely storing them in a safe right now.

  11. MicheleFrazier profile image80
    MicheleFrazierposted 4 years ago

    Why are you even asking this question? Do a little research using neutral, verified sources. You'll feel better.

    1. NotPC profile image60
      NotPCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      It's fun to bounce ideas and opinions off other hubbers! The forums are the perfect place for conversations like this. Why don't you comment on your own thoughts about gun control in the United States smile

      If not, we were glad that you stopped by!

      1. Vladimir Uhri profile image60
        Vladimir Uhriposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Why we do not confiscate all cars, which killed more people than guns. Then all abortion instruments from abortionists?

        1. Castlepaloma profile image23
          Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          extremely pro life, are we?

          I'm pro love, all baby need to be loved,  if they can be loved and we need cars, not guns.

          1. Vladimir Uhri profile image60
            Vladimir Uhriposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Then get love Manual.
            Please ask White House why they are using guns for their protection?

          2. profile image83
            Education Answerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Why do you dislike guns so much?  Shooting can be a rewarding, fun hobby.  Most gun owners are not murderers.

            1. Castlepaloma profile image23
              Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Shooting is not the problem

              It's killing animals they are not going to eat or putting people in danger or harms way and causing fear is a problem

              1. profile image83
                Education Answerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                . . .so we have to lose our rights, because some people do these things?  Some people get sued for the things they say.  By the same logic, we should all have our freedom of speech regulated and controled by the government.  I believe that the government should enforce the current laws, and stop treating everybody like we've done something wrong.

 
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