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Another EU country on the brink of collapse, why?

  1. Silverspeeder profile image60
    Silverspeederposted 3 years ago

    If the EU is such a wonderful economic powerhouse why is it all the parts of the jigsaw puzzle are starting not to fit together?
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22462604

    It seems the structure is flawed.........

    1. John Holden profile image61
      John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      It's not the European Union that is having problems, it's the Euro currency and many diverse economies all having to act like each other.

      Nothing at all flawed with the EU, plenty of flaws with the Euro.

      1. 84
        Education Answerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        The problem is debt, debt, and more debt.  You can't keep spending money and expect good things to happen.

        1. John Holden profile image61
          John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          No, the problem is effectively peasant economies trying to keep up with heavily industrialised economies.

          1. Silverspeeder profile image60
            Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            But surely that is the idea as to why peasant economies join the EU? To be subsidised by the industrialised economies. The current situation shows that the type of economic modle followed by the EU government is flawed.

          2. 84
            Education Answerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            On one hand, socialists say how advanced the economies are in much of Europe.  We hear resident socialists tell us about how so many European economies are more efficient and produce more than America per capita.  Now, we hear that they are peasant economies. 

            Few countries spend their way to long-term prosperity.

            1. Josak profile image61
              Josakposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              They were referring to Eastern European nations, they are not socialist.

              1. 84
                Education Answerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                I didn't say they were socialist.   You resident socialists like to talk about how great European governments are.  I'm guessing that you like many of these nations, because they are MORE socialist than America.  Social programs have a cost.

                1. Silverspeeder profile image60
                  Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  There had never been anything more socialist than the EU even if it is not.

                2. Josak profile image61
                  Josakposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  I don't think they really are more socialist at all, Eastern European countries are certainly not the ones "resident socialists" are referring to, I believe most of them are pretty right wing actually.

                  1. 84
                    Education Answerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                    Of course YOU don't think they are partially socialist.  Compared to what a capitalist or a conservative would want, they are far too close to socialism.  Pretty much all of Europe is socialist by a American standards.  Do you deny that most of Europe would be considered on the left side of the spectrum to Americans?  You shouldn't.

        2. rhamson profile image77
          rhamsonposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Like the US?

          1. 84
            Education Answerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Yes, like America.  Thanks for helping me make my point.

    2. Onusonus profile image87
      Onusonusposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Because they are socialists.

      1. Silverspeeder profile image60
        Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        The EU goverents operates a socialist system in a capitalist world that's why they are up to their necks in debt and doubt.
        Greece and Cyprus bankrupt, Spain, Italy, Portugal, France and many more on the brink, brings to mind the old house of cards. Stronger Europe for being together? Don't think so.......

      2. CHRIS57 profile image61
        CHRIS57posted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Doesn´t get into my mind what this has to do with socialist or capitalist systems. It is more the problem of productivity gaps between economies that share a common currency.
        What is happening within the Eurozone is also happening on a global scale between the US and China, China playing the "productive" part. And you don´t want to accuse the US of playing the socialist game and China of play capitalist :-) haven´t you asked yourself why the US is complaining about "artificially low RMB exchange rates? And what is taking place between China and the US is also happening between Northern Europe and Southern Europe or if you will between Northern Italy and the Mezzogiorno or in Germany between Bavaria and former East Germany. The flaw is the common currency, and you either allow sovereign currencies to float freely or you have to install measures to adjust the economic performance of different economies. The currency of olives is not as strong as the currency of BMW´s, the combined curreny of the Boeings, Apples and Caterpillars is not as strong as the currency of plastic toy makers and plagiate makers with workforce living in dormitories.
        All of us may have their moral standpoints and may disagree with the situation, but it as it is. The EU is like a laboratory where all economic problems of our world are bred in a petri dish, isolated in the common currency of the Euro.

        1. Silverspeeder profile image60
          Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Tax revenues.
          As soon as the tax revenues started to decrease the EU started to get into trouble.

          1. John Holden profile image61
            John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            As did every country in the world!

            1. Silverspeeder profile image60
              Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              They did John but not the extent of say Greece which was held up by the crutch of funding from the EU tax take.
              The sad thing is people still think the EU is not based on socialist ideals when it is plainly visible and because of this stronger nations in the union are taking the biggest hit.

              1. John Holden profile image61
                John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                But the EU is not based on socialist ideals - to say that it is displays a totally lack of understanding of socialism.

                1. Silverspeeder profile image60
                  Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  So you keep saying John but I wonder if even socialists understand socialism?

                  1. John Holden profile image61
                    John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                    Obviously not as well as you do <sarcasm>

    3. Dr Billy Kidd profile image91
      Dr Billy Kiddposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      It looks like only one person in this discussion has been to Europe. In general, Europeans are happier than Americans. And many of the countries are about 20 years more advanced socially--in that the quality of life matters and that they work on improving it.

      But if you want to call a place like Great Britain socialist, you'd have to be ignorant of it's place in the world economies. The City of London (rather than Greater London which has a separate mayor) has a charter dating back to 1100 that allows it to makes its own regulations on financial institutions.

      This is why London is the biggest tax haven in the world and the best place to off shore money to avoid your own country's taxes. In fact, they let you establish a corporation and put your money anonymously into whatever investment you wish. If this is socialism, bring it on.

  2. airsourceheatpump profile image60
    airsourceheatpumpposted 3 years ago

    I do not know, you guys like to use the credit card often, which make huge debts

  3. airsourceheatpump profile image60
    airsourceheatpumpposted 3 years ago

    EU OWN a lot industries, you can check out all the over.

    1. John Holden profile image61
      John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Like what?

  4. John Holden profile image61
    John Holdenposted 3 years ago

    The current populations of Birmingham, Leeds, Glasgow, Sheffield, Bradford, Manchester, Liverpool, Bristol and Oxford. add up to approx 4.8 million.

    Where do the other two million come from?

    1. Silverspeeder profile image60
      Silverspeederposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I suppose it's all according where you get your figures John.


      Birmingham (i/ˈbɜrmɪŋəm/ bur-ming-əm, locally /ˈbɜrmɪŋɡəm/ bur-ming-gəm) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England. It is the most populous British city outside the capital London with 1,074,300 residents (2011 census), an increase of 96,000 over the previous decade.[2] The city lies at the heart of the West Midlands conurbation, the second most populous urban area in the United Kingdom with a population of 2,284,093 (2001 census). Its metropolitan area is also the United Kingdom's second most populous with 3,683,000 residents.

 
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