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23nd Amendment?

  1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago

    EDIT:   Amendment proposed in '09, not 23rd. (There are currently 27 amendments.)

    Presidents are limited to no more than two terms in office. How about senators and other incumbents? This quote from Jim De Mint makes sense:

    "Incumbency allows politicians to raise millions of dollars in campaign funds in exchange for earmarks. Incumbency gives Congress the power to raise money for itself-
    Congress just approved itself an increase of nearly $250 million from the US Treasury that members will spend to promote themselves. Finally with redistricting, incumbents can choose their voters rather than voters choosing their representatives. Term limits is the best way to break this cycle."

    At present, the incumbents, (career politicians,) have no limits and some, (the current Vice President, for instance,) have been there forever. A constitutional amendment has been introduced to limit senators to no more than two six year terms in office, and representatives no more than three two year terms.

    Who would not agree with this?

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Those that have a financial (or control) finger in the pie.

      For the rest of us, who could ever argue with it?

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
        Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Yes. I noticed that House of Representative, Barney Frank and Senator Harry Reid from Nevada want to do away with the 22nd Amendment which gives the president term limits. Interesting, eh?

        ("Barney Frank: A member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts from 1981 to 2013. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as chairman of the House Financial Services Committee (2007–2011) and was a leading co-sponsor of the 2010 Dodd–Frank Act, a sweeping reform of the U.S. financial industry. Frank, a resident of Newton, Massachusetts, is considered the most prominent gay politician in the United States." Wikipedia)

        ("Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party serving since 1987. He has been the Senate Majority Leader since January 2007, having previously served as Minority Leader and Minority and Majority Whip." Wikipedia)

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Guessing, but it sounds like a political ploy; an bill introduced but without a shred of hope that it would ever pass.  Something to keep someone somewhere happy.  And earn some re-election funds, probably.

          1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
            Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            I see.
            What do you suppose is up with the Right To Vote proposal backed by Jesse Jackson?

            1. wilderness profile image95
              wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              Haven't a clue.  Didn't realize that hardly any citizens had lost the right to vote.

              Unless maybe another "districting" ploy, to get more of one party in his district.  Or that of his friends.  I think I'd like to hear from opponents of the bill - it sounds to reasonable, too "right" to be true.

              1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
                Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                Thanks, wilderness. smile

      2. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
        Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Who are the ones with the financial finger in the pie? (only those in control…?)

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Those that earn their living from it (legislators, aides, campaign managers, etc.).  People depending on those long life legislators bringing home the bacon to pay their businesses for something - building roads, maybe.

  2. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago

    Note:
    "Approximately 11,539 measures have been proposed to amend the Constitution from 1789 through January 2, 2013. (Many,) introduced by a member of Congress, either died in committee or did not receive a two-thirds vote in both houses of Congress and were therefore not sent to the states for ratification." Wikipedia

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago

    21st century proposed amendments: (Wikipedia)
    A Balanced Budget Amendment - Congress and the President are forced to balance the budget every year

    School Prayer Amendment proposed on April 9, 2003 - to establish that "The people retain the right to pray and to recognize their religious beliefs, heritage, and traditions on public property, including schools.

    God in the Pledge of Allegiance – declaring that it is not an establishment of religion for teachers to lead students in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance (with the words "one Nation under God"), proposed on February 27, 2003, by Oklahoma Representative Frank Lucas.

    Every Vote Counts Amendment – proposed by Congressman Gene Green on September 14, 2004. It would abolish the electoral college.

    Continuity of Government Amendment – after a Senate hearing in 2004 regarding the need for an amendment to ensure continuity of government in the event that many members of Congress become incapacitated, Senator John Cornyn introduced an amendment to allow Congress to temporarily replace members after at least a quarter of either chamber is incapacitated.

    Equal Opportunity to Govern Amendment – proposed by Senator Orrin Hatch. It would allow naturalized citizens with at least twenty years' citizenship to become president.
    Seventeenth Amendment repeal – proposed in 2004 by Georgia Senator Zell Miller. It would reinstate the appointment of Senators by state legislatures as originally required by Article One, Section Three, Clauses One and Three.

    The Federal Marriage Amendment has been introduced in the United States Congress four times: in 2003, 2004, 2005/2006 and 2008 by multiple members of Congress (with support from then-President George W. Bush). It would define marriage and prohibit same-sex marriage, even at the state level.

    Twenty-second Amendment repeal – proposed as early as 1989, various congressmen, including Rep. Barney Frank, Rep. Steny Hoyer, Rep. José Serrano,[13] Rep. Howard Berman, and Sen. Harry Reid, have introduced legislation, but each resolution died before making it out of its respective committee. The current amendment limits the president to two elected terms in office, and up to two years succeeding a President in office. Last action was On January 4, 2013, Rep. José Serrano once again introduced H.J.Res. 15 proposing an Amendment to repeal the 22nd Amendment, as he has done every two years since 1997.

    On January 16, 2009, Senator David Vitter of Louisiana proposed an amendment which would have denied US citizenship to anyone born in the US unless at least one parent were a US citizen, a permanent resident, or in the armed forces.

    On February 25, 2009, Senator Lisa Murkowski, because she believed the District of Columbia House Voting Rights Act of 2009 would be unconstitutional if adopted, proposed a Constitutional amendment that would provide a Representative to the District of Columbia.

    On November 11, 2009, Senator Jim DeMint proposed term limits for the U.S. Congress, where the limit for senators will be two terms for a total of 12 years and for representatives, three terms for a total of six years.

    On November 15, 2011, Representative James P. McGovern introduced the People's Rights Amendment, a proposal to limit the Constitution's protections only to the rights of natural persons, and not corporations. This amendment would overturn the United States Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission.

    On December 8, 2011 Senator Bernie Sanders filed The Saving American Democracy Amendment, which would state that corporations are not entitled to the same constitutional rights as people. It would also ban corporate campaign donations to candidates, and give Congress and the states broad authority to regulate spending in elections. This amendment would overturn the United States Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission.

    Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. backed the Right to Vote Amendment, a proposal to explicitly guarantee the right to vote for all legal U.S. citizens and empower Congress to protect this right; he introduced a resolution for the amendment in the 107th, 108th, 109th, 110th, 111th and 112th, all of which died in committee. On May 13, 2013, Reps. Mark Pocan and Keith Ellison re-introduced the bill.

 
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