jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (72 posts)

Is President Obama out of line in his view of marijuana legalization

  1. Credence2 profile image89
    Credence2posted 3 years ago

    Hi, folks, getting a lot of mixed messages from the press. See this article, is there any merit? What do you think?

    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/power-playe … .html?vp=1

    1. Quilligrapher profile image91
      Quilligrapherposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Hi! Back atcha, Credence. I share the concerns aired by former DEA administrator Peter Bensinger.

      While I do not oppose legalizing marijuana, I do have an issue with claims that its use is a harmless recreational activity.

      “Marijuana Use Causes Brain Damage Confirmed” published online in August 2012, reports on a study conducted down under at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute. MRI brain scans of a group of subjects who used pot for an average of 15 years were compared to another group who had never used the drug. The comparisons revealed there was more than 80 percent reduction of white matter in the brains of the pot users.

      “Additionally, researchers found that the average age of participants in the study started using cannabis when they were 16 years old. Participants who started using the drug at a younger age like 10 or 11 had even more severe brain damage.”

      The article adds, “Researchers linked the significant changes in the white matter in the brain's hippocampus and commissural fibers, suggesting that long-term marijuana use may lead to memory impairment and deficits in learning and concentration ability.” {1}

      As for confusion, another researcher contradicts his own conclusions. “Heavy Marijuana Use Doesn't Damage Brain” from July 2003, is based on “scores of thinking tests” that compared “various aspects of brain function -- including reaction time, language and motor skills, reasoning ability, memory, and the ability to learn new information.”

      Contradicting the title, the article reports researchers found impairment in memory and learning among long-term marijuana users that they characterized as "very small" but did not otherwise quantify. In the words of lead researcher and psychiatrist Igor Grant, MD, "However, there might be a different set of circumstances to a 12-year-old whose nervous system is still developing." {2}

      Ironically, Dr. Grant was committed to establishing that the short-term side effects of pot administered to individuals in a medical setting “would be safer than what is practiced by street users.”

      In addition to the findings above, a broad consensus of medical professionals agree that the risks of smoking marijuana go up with heavy use:

      Typically, heavy marijuana use lowers men's testosterone levels, sperm count and quality. 

      It can affect libido and fertility in men.

      It is psychologically addictive.

      One in 12 occasional users experience withdrawal symptoms if they cannot get high when they want to.

      The rates of dependence are higher among heavy pot smokers.

      Many experts believe marijuana is physically addictive and report symptoms of withdrawal that might include aggression, anxiety, depressed mood, and/or decreased appetite. {3}

      Actually, most studies agree that heavy long-term pot use does indeed damage the brain.
      http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6919429.jpg
      {1} http://www.medicaldaily.com/articles/11 … iction.htm
      {2} http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/news … mage-brain
      {3} http://answers.webmd.com/answers/118214 … -marijuana

    2. profile image60
      retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Pot legalization has been supported as a revenue generator.  I wonder how much more revenue could be generated for neighboring state's coffers if they merely stopped every automobile leaving Colorado and arrested, ticketed, fined and impounded for violating their own drug possession, transportation and trafficking laws. It would not be unlike California's agricultural check points. It is what I would do to make the Colorado voters choice benefit the taxpayers of Utah, Wyoming, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

      1. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Disgusting, isn't it?  Always, always, do your best to get someone else to foot the bills for what you (or your state) wants but doesn't want to pay for.

        So legalize weed and let the small (powerless) minority that use it pay the cost of running the state.  Pathetic, but predictable.

    3. gmwilliams profile image82
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I total agree with Bensinger regarding this issue at hand.  He is correct in his premise that increased legalization of marijuana will be a disaster.  President Obama's "belief" that marijuana is no more dangerous than alcohol is a fallacy.  Marijuana is the gateway drug to harder and more dangeous drugs.

  2. GA Anderson profile image84
    GA Andersonposted 3 years ago

    Is the debated medically harmful effects the right question to determine this issue? I don't believe it is.

    I know I am stepping into the trap of two wrongs don't make a right, but...

    Comparatively speaking, if the medical damage is the determining factor, then how can the regulation and sale of cigarettes, alcohol, and a lot of prescription drugs, (read some of their warning labels), be justified?

    Setting aside my perspective on the government's right to regulate behavior in general, I think the medical danger rational should be a "threshold" issue. ie. there should be an obvious and indisputable degree of harm before it is a valid consideration - a "line in the sand" so to speak.

    I don't think the dangers of pot reach that threshold.

    So... then perhaps it should be other criteria that influence the decision.

    Can pot use really be stopped?
    Past efforts; law enforcement apprehension and interdiction, incarceration penalties, financial penalties, public education on the issue, and pushing the morality button have all apparently failed.

    Is the cure worse than the disease?
    Are law enforcement and incarceration costs, relative to results, justifiable as successful?
    Is incarcerating a recreational pot smoker equitable with incarcerating a burglar?

    Does the illegality promote crime and criminal organizations, whereas legalization could essentially put illegal pot dealers and suppliers out of business?

    Given my opinion that the medical dangers of pot don't cross the threshold that would make it a "Duh!" factor - these are the questions I think should carry more weight in the debate.

    ps. I know personal anecdotal declarations have little meaning when compared to massive study results, but... I have known a lot of long-term pot smokers. I mean a lot! And I don't ever recall knowing any that were "addicted" to pot, even psychologically.

    So put me in the pro-legalization column. But I think Obama was 100% wrong making the public statement he did.

    GA

    1. Credence2 profile image89
      Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Quill and GA, thanks for weighin in. The president may not be the best qualified person to make the statement that he did. It was obviously a subjective one that may have skirted medical reality.

      With tobacco, alcohol and similar products on the market, I cannot really make the case that marijuana is any better worse than these. I would not feel comfortable having a driver who had was smoked a joint. The lengths we go through for some comfort....   

      Marijuana does have deleterious effect on cognition and with continued use may become permanent, I am not the expert. I can only hope that this is not a slippery slope toward legalization of other drugs that without question are much more dangerous. 

      I am returning to Colorado after a disastrous stint in Panama over the last 4 months. I expect to be inundated with reefer madness and pot heads all over the place. But, it would be good to be home for a while.

      I do criticize the President for speaking out of turn!

      1. GA Anderson profile image84
        GA Andersonposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Now there is a thread you must start... Hawaii to Panama to Colorado, what gives with that?

        And when say "home" do you mean the U.S. or are you originally from Colorado?

        And what was so disastrous about Panama?

        At least one online friend wants the story.

        GA

        1. Credence2 profile image89
          Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          It is a long story and deserves a hub, yes I am originally from Colorado. I will have to tell all how we ended up leaving Hawaii, following the International Living lure went to Panama, and medical circumstances forces my return to my home of record. Well, friend, I am anxious to share the misadventures as my writer's block is coming to an end, as soon as we relocate and things steady down a bit.  I did learn quite of bit of Spanish though.

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image87
    Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago

    Pot is self-induced mental retardation. Very good for the government if they want non-thinking, lazy, will-less citizens which they can easily control toward their own ends or ignore completely.

    1. Credence2 profile image89
      Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      That is a good reason for thoughtful people to stay away from the stuff, thanks for your contribution

      1. profile image60
        retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

        See, an area of agreement, who would have thought.

        1. Credence2 profile image89
          Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          I am astounded, I guess that anything is possible.

          1. profile image60
            retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Just goes to show, there is hope for you.

            1. Credence2 profile image89
              Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

              ......and for you

      2. Castlepaloma profile image27
        Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Credence
        That is a good reason for thoughtful people to stay away from the stuff, thanks for your contribution

        Sounds like some people are still come from the old school of Reefer Madness and Weed being America's public enemy number 1.

        Imprisoning most inmates for pot is the greates crime against the people on the  planet and also towards natures most important plant in the world, (cannabis)

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          A little exaggeration is always good, isn't it?

          " greates crime against the people " would never be genocide or gassing them to death, but putting them in prison for violating the law.

          "natures most important plant in the world, (cannabis)"  How many tons of wood are harvested each year?  Or wheat, maize or rice?  And how many hemp?

          1. Castlepaloma profile image27
            Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            What exaggeration?, read my thread.

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              I read your thread.  It said the same thing - that cannabis is the most important plant in the world, as #5 (at least) in tonnage produced.  I find that to be a huge exaggeration.

              I also find it a huge exaggeration (the type that turns me off as an obvious play on emotions rather than fact) that putting a person in jail is a bigger crime that genocide.  Worse than the holocaust, more terrible than human slavery.

              1. Castlepaloma profile image27
                Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                Millions of people are inprison or killed over marijuana in American. Try to get a job with record or take care of a family

                Marijuana is the top agricultural cash crop in the world, It take in marginal area not usually associated with agriculture production yet it on of the tops profiting in the farm World. Cannabis is even listed on the world wide wall street market exchange, who is to stop or bail them out now.

                1. wilderness profile image94
                  wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  And the millions in jail (from their own stupidity in violating the law) are worse than the dead from the holocaust.  Got it.

                  Bull.  Forestry is.  Over twice as much wood is made just into paper as is grown in hemp, and that is the minor part of it.  Add in that the biggest reason cannabis produces so much cash is that it is illegal and you dilute the argument even further - if you legalize it the value will drop 90% or more.

                  There is no way that hemp, once legalized, could keep up with even rice, let alone maize or wood.

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image27
                    Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                    How many people in America since World War Two have died from any holocaust. The war on drugs, (mainly cannabis) started around the same  time as world war two with 50,000 people that have tried it. Today, half of North America's have tried it , would you imprison or kill them too.

                    Plus in the world today per capita wars are less today than any other time in history. Poverty and stupidity today is the greatest killer today The cannabis plant has not killed anyone directly in 10,000 years. the worst thing about cannabis is it's illegal time-x ten

                    Hemp make 50,000 products name me one plant that make that many products

                    Canadian hemp farmer claim it is a rotation crop and be substituted for almost any harvests wroth more two to three time than soy or corn. Hemp produces paper and chip boards (obs) 4 times greater per acre than 20 year growth of trees. Henry Ford invented his car made from hemp and power by hemp so on etc...

        2. Credence2 profile image89
          Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          I have no problem with it, I make choices for myself to preserve myself  in the best way for as long as I can. I am more than content to let others make their own choices as they see fit. In that context,  Marijuana, is no different from alcohol or tobacco . No one goes to jail for this.

      3. FitnezzJim profile image89
        FitnezzJimposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        K: "Pot is self-induced mental retardation. Very good for the government if they want non-thinking, lazy, will-less citizens which they can easily control toward their own ends or ignore completely."
        C: "That is a good reason for thoughtful people to stay away from the stuff, thanks for your contribution."

        So, is it true are founding fathers used to wear clothing woven from hemp?  And what does this imply with respect to the quotes above?

        Should Obama restart an old fashion?

        1. profile image60
          retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          I have never heard of one of our Founding Fathers smoking his trousers.

        2. Credence2 profile image89
          Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Hi, FJ, I really don't think that we want to go there.... The damn clothing from what I heard were pretty uncomfortable.

          1. profile image60
            retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

            It is just a good example of pot brain, they say hemp when we say pot.  It is like huffing gasoline or driving your car with it.  One use is a self destructive intoxicant and the other an industrial and personal boon.  If we were discussing the economic uses of hemp and its by products he would have had a fair point. We are talking about a drug whose chemical effects on the brain, especially the adolescent brain, are detrimental and deleterious.

        3. Castlepaloma profile image27
          Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          FitnezzJim

          Pot is self-induced mental retardation. Very good for the government if they want non-thinking people

          Is this base on Governments test on monkeys where they smoothied him by a mask induse of big fast 40 joints continiously untill his brain damage shortly followed by the monkeys death.

          It was it by the Governments test by dropping a 25 kilo bale of pot on a rat from 10 stories. Either way these test  could cause brain damage or death or was their scienctist who suffer from mental retardation.

          1. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            The one I saw had brain tissue mixed with a strong solution containing pot and left on a window sill in the sun for one week.  It was then strained, centrifuged and put into a kitchen blender.  There was definite damage to the brain tissue.

            These are all rather funny, though it can be kind of sad when someone presents them as actual tests by government.  But actual studies are freely available; Quillagrapher gave a line to some above:
            http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/120317#post2548057

            And yes, these actual, well run, tests do show brain damage from prolonged use of THC.

            1. Castlepaloma profile image27
              Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              I like my own head clear, although, if my daughter was hook on something , would prefer she be hooked on pot  rather than alcohol or tobacco. Since coffee is more of an addiction than cannabis it's unlikely to happen.

              Do agree on a law for kids under 21 there has been negative effect on  mental illnesses such as schizophrenia generally provokes relapse and aggravates existing symptoms, yet, not anymore than alcohol.

              If people started smoking lettuces than that would be a health issues too. If ones wants to kill them-self at the local drug counter, the druggist will sell you many things that can do that too, with a smile. If money is a problem, go into the forest and eat poison plants, then this person deserves to die, one less idiot on the planet

  4. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago

    I think medical damage is very much the issue.  Some widely culturally accepted drugs will remain in use regardless.  But for the others it is a question of dangerousness.

    1. Credence2 profile image89
      Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      That  is why I fervently hope that this legalization craze does not go beyond marijuana because of the point that you make so clear.

  5. profile image60
    retief2000posted 3 years ago

    If Utah were my state, I would take perverse delight in ruthless enforcement of fines for bringing pot from Colorado into Utah.  What a potential boon for Utah citizens and without any additional regulation or taxes.

    1. Credence2 profile image89
      Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I think that you will find that the trend to legalize may well extend far beyond Colorado and Washington. You can't just randomly search cars leaving Colo for surrounding states without probable cause or reasonable suspicion, don't want to get accused of profiling. This is a legal nightmare that will turn the perversion back on the surrounding states.

      1. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Gotta love the profiling - "Look!  It's from Colorado!  Stop 'em quick!" smile

        1. Credence2 profile image89
          Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          But if Cheech and Chung came in from Colorado, I would have to stop them, they have probably already moved there!

        2. profile image60
          retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Probable cause is not profiling.  Colorado permits the sale of pot to all adults.  That is reason enough to insist that all cars leaving Colorado submit to a quick check for sobriety and drugs.  California insists on agricultural inspections, Utah could insist on the same - the transportation of a banned herb.

          1. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Utah permits the sale of alcohol; may Colorado cops stop every Utah driver for probably cause of drunkenness?  Or open containers?  How about illegally obtained prescription drugs?  They have kids in Utah; can Colorado cops stop every car to see if there is a kidnap victim inside?

            I don't think legality constitutes probably cause to think it is present.

            1. profile image60
              retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

              The sale and consumption of alcohol is not illegal in Colorado.  A far more apt comparison might be between the dry and wet counties of Tennessee. Yes, cars from wet counties are often stopped and inspected by police in dry ones.

              1. wilderness profile image94
                wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                DUI is illegal there, as is open containers (I think) and certainly kidnapping and stolen prescription drugs or same without a valid prescription.

                Again, I do not see mere legality as probably cause to think it is there.  And I don't think that stopping cars crossing Tennessee county lines in a search for booze would be found constitutional.

      2. profile image60
        retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Since Colorado has legalized the sale of pot to any adult, that would constitute probable cause to search any vehicle leaving Colorado, much like California stops cars to search for things that are not illegal anywhere else - like house plants.  How can it be profiling if there is no other criteria than stopping cars leaving Colorado - a state that freely practices the distribution of something completely illegal in neighboring states?

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Actually, I don't think a cop could make a case for "probably cause" being that it was legal to do.

          1. profile image60
            retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Not legal in Utah, New Mexico, etc.... If one wishes to consume his purchase in Colorado and spend the time to return to sobriety before entering a neighboring state, then he is free to do so.  I think a case can be made and I, if attorney general for Utah would love to test it.

        2. Credence2 profile image89
          Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Yeah, what is this,  retief, a police state? You are justified in stopping people who happen to come in from Colorado for no other reason except the fact that they  travel through or reside there? I would eat you alive in court, your premise is ridiculous, and you were doing so well.....
          All I know is that you better have a reason to stop me, and any sobriety test used better truly be random, or I will see you in court. I can be very litigious, being a liberal and such. It is profiling, it is not a crime to be from Colorado and you had better be able to support that a stop for drugs or alcohol is justified beyond the fact that the driver is from Colorado!!

          1. profile image60
            retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Cars arriving from Mexico are routinely searched, for the same reasons.

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              Cars coming from Mexico do not need probable cause to be searched.  It is a part of being allowed to enter the country (and termed customs), but interstate travel has no equivalent.

              1. Credence2 profile image89
                Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

                This is most certainly true...

              2. profile image60
                retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

                What do you think customs inspections are?

                1. wilderness profile image94
                  wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  Well, when I came through, they search my car for any contraband.  Come to think of it my RV was also searched before being allowed to drive over Hoover Dam, but I imagine that was NSA and they can do no wrong. roll

                  1. profile image60
                    retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

                    Pot is contraband in Utah?  What is a customs check again?

                2. Credence2 profile image89
                  Credence2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  Retief, it this what it means to be a conservative? Look at the things that you advocate. Colorado has  to pay the price because all of the libs there voted this in.  You say get the government off from people's back but you are content to have them vitually hump people on this issue. You certainly are not  libertarian nor even a moderate conservative  but one of those hard right guys that  so many in this forum say are rare in actuality. Just because they made doobie legal in Colorado does not mean that the Constitution is put on hold.

                  What you are speaking of is an unreasonable search and seizure and we both know that searches over international borders have no relationship as to what can be done between states. But to make your point Hawaii does have stringent regulations regarding the introduction of certain plants into their ecosystem, while I have never been searched for it, I know that  your will be stopped when leaving a plane if there is suspicion that one is in violation.  This law has specific appliication and can be interpreted and enforced in a very narrow way. No blanket roundups.

                  1. profile image60
                    retief2000posted 3 years ago in reply to this

                    Oh, no, I say Utah should profit from Colorado's foolishness and that Utah has a sovereign right to do so.  If pot legalization is about filling public coffers, and it is regularly sold to the public as such, then why not fill the coffers of your neighbor's state, as well.  Should we scrutinize those who travel from countries where terrorists train, where drug cartels operate, where rare species are poached, then why not from where pot is legal?

                    The only reason we tolerate the blurring of state borders is because lefties have corrupted the Commerce Clause so that it now means the NATIONAL government has plenary powers over every thing. One of the many lefty corruptions of the Constitution.

  6. crazyhorsesghost profile image76
    crazyhorsesghostposted 3 years ago

    I think we as an American people should have the right to vote on legalizing marijuana on a nation wide basis. I am sure if it was voted on nationwide it would pass. Then the money being wasted on policing this issue could be spent in a lot better places.

    It is never going to work to keep marijuana illegal. All it does it make money for police departments, court systems and judges. Prohibition never worked and keeping marijuana illegal is just as stupid.

    Its like a man standing with a coffee cup trying to bail the ocean dry.

    I say legalize the marijuana and tax it. Use that tax money to do important things like buy the meds for seniors that can't afford it or pay for food for hungry people.

    Its sad how screwed up politically correct BS is screwing up America. I say to hell with both fine parties. Start over and build a America for Americans. To hell with any other country or the problems of any other country. We have enough problems here in our own country.

    1. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I agree that it should probably be legalized, in spite of the reports of physical damage. 

      I do NOT agree that users should then be used as an additional tax base; I will never agree to taxing a small, politically powerless group, for anything but special services that only they receive.  To do otherwise is a gross misuse of the power of the majority.

      But I do find it rather amusing that you say now it just makes money for the govt. and keeping it illegal is stupid.  I'd have to say that those going to jail are rather stupid for putting themselves in that position for such a small return.  Is a joint really worth a year behind bars, or whatever they got?

      1. Castlepaloma profile image27
        Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        The Government is doing the unnatural crime against the people since most people want pot legal and have been brainwashing people from 1937.

        If the Government wanted to make tobacco illegal. Why not? since it's killed more people than all drugs combined. A small part of Cannabis is a soft drug, yet it has far more benefits than any other plant on earth. They protect the fake greedy rich and over control the people's freedom.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          You do know that a crime is violation of a law created by our legislature?  I don't think they have done that by following the laws of the land.

          Sorry - cannabis has no nutritional value I'm aware of.  And I would rather have food than clothing, rope or even a mind cancelling drug.  It thus has lesser benefits than other plants, and a lot of them.

          Absolutely our government over control's people's freedom.  Which is what would be added to by requiring potheads to pay more tax than anyone else.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image27
            Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            The Cannabis plant is one of the most nutritious plants there is. It is thought to be second to just the Soy plant in nutritious value.
            Apart from being nutritious the Cannabis plant is very beneficial for many medical uses.

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah, I know THC kills pain, along with cognition.

              But food?  Who eats it, and what is made from it?  Not, mind you, a bit put into the brownies, but brownies with the basis as cannabis.

              1. Castlepaloma profile image27
                Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                The Government has turned more into a form of corporatism giving most people the illusion of freedom

                Cancer Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, inhibit tumor growth in laboratory animals and also kill cancer cells. THC targets cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 is similar in function to endocannabinoids, and treat lung cancer.\
                2. Tourette’s Syndrome involuntary grunts, snorts and shouts.

                3. Seizures Marijuana is a muscle relaxant and has “antispasmodic” qualities that have proven to be a very effective treatment for seizures.
                4. Migraines  where conventional medicine couldn’t
                5. Glaucoma very powerful and popular effects on glaucoma patients.
                6. Multiple Sclerosis works to stop the neurological effects and muscle spasms that come from the fatal disease.
                7. ADD and ADHD A well documented USC treats the disorder without any of the negative side effects of the pharmaceutical.
                8. IBS and Crohn’s help with symptoms of the chronic diseases as it stops nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.
                9. Alzheimer’s works to prevent Alzheimer’s by blocking the deposits in the brain that cause the disease.
                10. Premenstrual Syndrome to treat the cramps and discomfort that causes PMS symptoms. goes all the way back to Queen Victoria.


                There are many list Marijuana pizza, food festival, coffee shop and weed fine restaurants to choice from.

                1. Castlepaloma profile image27
                  Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  I get high just talking about this stuff it's been a long time

                2. wilderness profile image94
                  wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                  Not a single one of those can be classified as a food source, let alone nutrition.  You have stated that MJ is the most nutritious food source in the world; can you back it up or just more nonsense without a grain of truth in it?

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image27
                    Castlepalomaposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                    You think the federal government honestly give the public real food and medicine facts, when the people can grow all this in their backyard.

                    Nutrition
                    30–35% of the weight of hempseed is oil containing 80% of the unsaturated essential fatty acids (EFAs), linoleic acid (LA, 55%) and linolenic acid (ALA, 21–25%). These are not manufactured by the body and must be supplied by food. The proportions of linoleic acid and linolenic acid in hempseed oil are perfectly balanced to meet human requirements for EFAs, including gamma-linoleic acid (GLA). Unlike flax oil and others, hempseed oil can be used continuously without developing a deficiency or other imbalance of EFAs. Hemp also contains 31% complete and highly-digestible protein, 1/3 as edestin protein and 2/3 as albumin protein. This protein profile is second only to raw uncooked soybeans (35% vs. 31%), and the amino acid profile is superior to soybean, human milk, and cow's milk, and similar to egg whites.
                    The ALA contained in plant seed oils by itself is sufficient for nutrition, as your body is capable of converting it into other fatty acids. However, this conversion process is inefficient, and the broader spectrum of omega-3 fatty acids obtained from oily fish is easier for the body to immediately utilize (see Fish and plants as a source of Omega-3).
                    Typical nutritional analysis of shelled hempseed:
                    Calories/100 g    567
                    Protein (Nx5.46)    30.6%
                    Fat    47.2%
                    Saturated fat    5.2%
                    Monounsaturated fat    5.8%
                    Polyunsaturated fat    36.2%
                    Carbohydrate    10.9%
                    Oleic 18:1 (Omega-9)    5.8%
                    Linoleic 18:2 (Omega-6)    27.56%
                    Linolenic 18:3 (Omega-3)    8.68%
                    Cholesterol    0.0%
                    Total dietary fiber    6.0%
                    Vitamin A (B-Carotene)    4 IU/100 g
                    Thiamine (Vit B1)    1.38 mg/100 g
                    Riboflavin (Vit B2)    0.33 mg/100 g
                    Vitamin B6    0.12 mg/100 g
                    Vitamin C    1.0 mg/100 g
                    Vitamin D    2277.5 IU/100 g [citation needed]
                    Vitamin E (dl-A-Tocopherol)    8.96 IU/100 g
                    Sodium    9.0 mg/100 g
                    Calcium    74.0 mg/100 g
                    Iron    4.7 mg/100 g

                    [link to en.wikipedia.org]

 
working