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USA/Saudi Arabia, their hands in the oil jar

  1. maxoxam41 profile image79
    maxoxam41posted 2 years ago

    For the Atlanticist press, the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). which has just invaded the north and west of Iraq. is a group of jihadists led by their faith, the Koran in one hand and a Kalashnikov in the other. For those who have suffered their abuses, including in Syria, it is a private army of mercenaries, composed from the four corners of the Earth and managed by American, French and Saudi officers - dividing the region to allow easier control by the colonial powers.

    If one conceives of members of the ISIL as armed believers, we cannot imagine dark material interests behind their attack. But if we admit that these thugs are manipulating religion to give the illusion that Allah blesses their crimes, we must be more attentive.

    While shedding crocodile tears for the thousands of Iraqi victims of this offensive, the Atlanticist press decries the consequences of this new conflict for oil prices. Within days, the barrel rose to $115, that is to say the level of September 2013. Markets were concerned about the fight for the Baiji refinery near Tikrit. In reality, this refinery produces only for local consumption, which could quickly run out of fuel and electricity. Rising oil prices is not due to the interruption of Iraqi production, but the disruption of deliveries. It will thus not last as markets are in surplus.
    JPEG - 30.7 kbIn brown: The Zone Invaded by the ISIL (As-Safir map)
    Saudi Arabia has announced that it will significantly increase its production to compensate for the reduced supply due to the marketing ban by ISIL. But experts are skeptical and point out that the kingdom has never produced more than 10 million barrels per day.

    The Atlanticist press, which denies the sponsorship of NATO, learnedly explained that the ISIL suddenly became rich by conquering oil wells. This was already the case in northern Syria, but it had not noticed. The western press had tried to deal with fighting between the al-Nosra Front and the Islamic Emirate as a rivalry exacerbated by the "regime", while they sought to monopolize the oil wells.

    However, a question arises to which the Atlanticist media and the Gulf is still has no answer: how can these terrorists sell oil on the international market so monitored by Washington? In March, the Libyan Benghazi separatists had failed to sell the oil that they had seized. The U.S. Navy intercepted the tanker Morning Glory and had returned it to Libya. [1]

    If the Frente al-Nosra and the ISIL are able to sell oil on the international market, they are authorized by Washington and are linked to storefront oil companies.

    Chance has it that the annual world congress of the oil companies was held from June 15 to 19 in Moscow. We thought there would be talk of Ukraine, but there the issues were Iraq and Syria. It was learned that the oil stolen by the Frente al-Nosra in Syria is sold by Exxon-Mobil (the Rockefeller firm that rules Qatar), while that of ISIL is operated by Aramco (USA / Saudi Arabia ). Note in passing that during the Libyan conflict, NATO authorized Qatar (that is to say, Exxon-Mobil) to sell oil from the " territories liberated by al-Qaeda”.

    We can therefore read the current fighting, as all those of the twentieth century in the Middle East, as a war between oil companies. [2] The fact that the ISIL is financed by Aramco is enough to explain why Saudi Arabia claims to be able to compensate for the decline in Iraqi production: the kingdom would just put its stamp on the stolen barrels to legalize them.
    JPEG - 26.2 kb
    The ISIL breakthrough allows it to control the two main pipelines: the one exiting toward Banias to supply Syria while the other transporting crude to the Turkish port of Ceyhan. The Islamic Emirate has interrupted the first, causing additional power outages in Syria, but strangely, it allows the second to function.

    This is because this pipeline is used by the local pro-Israel Kurdistan government to export the oil it just stole from Kirkuk. However, as I explained last week [3], the ISIL attack is coordinated with Kurdistan to cut Iraq into three smaller states, according to the map reshaping "the Greater Middle East" established by US Staff in 2001, that the U.S. military failed to win in 2003, but Senator Joe Biden had adopted by Congress in 2007. [4]

    Kurdistan has begun its oil exports from Kirkuk via the ISIL-controlled pipeline. Within days, it was able to load two tankers at Ceyhan, chartered by Palmali Shipping & Agency JSC, the company of billionaire Turkish-Azeri Mubariz Gurbanoğlu. However, after the al-Maliki government, which has not been overthrown by Washington, issued a note denouncing this theft, none of the companies usually working in Kurdistan (Chevron, Hess, Total) dared to buy this oil. Failing to find a buyer, Kurdistan has declared its readiness to sell its cargo at half price at $ 57.5 per barrel, while continuing its traffic. Two other tankers are being loaded, always with the blessing of the ISIL. The fact that traffic continues in the absence of a market shows that Kurdistan and the ISIL are convinced that they will succeed in finding a buyer, indicating they have the same state supports: Israel and Saudi Arabia.

    The possible division of Iraq into three will not fail to reshuffle the oil cards. In the face of the ISIL breakthrough, all oil companies have reduced their staff. Some more than others: this is the case of BP, Royal Deutsch Shell (which employs Sheikh Moaz al-Khatib, the geologist former president of the Syrian National Coalition), Türkiye Petrolleri Anonim Ortaklığı (TPAO) and Chinese companies (PetroChina, Sinopec and CNOOC).

    So the losers are the British, the Turks, and especially the Chinese, who were by far Iraq’s largest customer. The winners are the U.S., Israel and Saudi Arabia.

    The stakes are thus unrelated to a fight for the "true Islam."

    Thierry Meyssan

    Once again, only for humanitarian reasons, right?

    1. Silverspeeder profile image61
      Silverspeederposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Where do you get this rubbish from maxoxam, do you live in Colorado?

      1. maxoxam41 profile image79
        maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Can't you copy/paste like the majority of us? Silverspeed said it was rubbish therefore it is! Sorry, you are not an authority in the field however it is an opinion like another. In fact, like mine!

      2. Quilligrapher profile image89
        Quilligrapherposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Good Morning, Karl.
        May I address you as Karl? My friends call me Quill and I hope you will too.

        I do not think Max likes to reveal his sources.

        This particular article, written by Thierry Meyssan, was stolen without proper attribution from a web site founded by the author called the Voltaire Network International. This “network” formed the “Axis for Peace” as an international, anti-imperialist forum with the stated mission of promoting a “strategy against imperialism and Zionism.” Mr. Meyssan refers to himself as a “French intellectual” but he is really just a journalist currently living in Damascus, Syria who writes for the Russian weekly magazine Odnako. {1}

        I have never seen Mr. Meyssan or Max say anything positive about the USA.
        {1} http://www.voltairenet.org/article184382.html

        1. maxoxam41 profile image79
          maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Why would Meyssan say something positive about the US if it doesn't behave accordingly. Meyssan is an objective man since as a rational person I can figure out if what he says makes sense or not.
          When nbc doesn't relate news, I am obliged to seek another source. Why nothing was said about Israel attacking Lebanon (was it in 2006?), about Ukraine attacking Russia few days ago...? Why do I have to read it from Meyssan's website?
          It is everybody's right to believe and have one's own opinion but if you come here and try to discredit Meyssan with nbc as a "news" provider, you will understand that I don't take you seriously. Soon, you will tell me that we are not in Afghanistan, Syria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Libya... Everywhere there's wealth, there's a dissident government, there's a conflict, WE ARE THERE!
          My next hub is about De Gaulle and the US. Or the strange coincidence between his refusal to be part of NATO and his failed assassination. Himself knew who tried to assassinate. His enemies were England and the US. You are also going to persuade me of the contrary?

          1. wilderness profile image96
            wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Is there a country/government in the world where we are not there?  You say we're at every dissident government but what you fail to mention is that we're at every government in the world, dissident or not.

            1. maxoxam41 profile image79
              maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

              You tell me you who wants to give me a lesson. You know exactly what I'm referring to. Which purpose does have our trade agreements besides privileging our interests? By our interests, I mean, the 0ne percentile's. We are in Europe, Africa, Asia... We are influencing everybody. What we do domestically, we export it internationally. Turkey is our dog. Syria is dissident. France is our dog. Russia is dissident...

            2. maxoxam41 profile image79
              maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

              No we are not in Syria, Russia, China, North Korea, Venezuela... Fortunately it is a plethora. It gives hope for the future of the world.

        2. Silverspeeder profile image61
          Silverspeederposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Yes You can call me anything you like but as that is my name that will be fine.

          I find Max Quite interesting, I know there are people with different views and opinions, especially when it comes to ones country but he does seem to have some vitriol about his country in particular and Israel seems to be his main enemy.
          He of course has a right to that opinion as do I mine but as I get fun poked at me sometimes I did it with him and the result seemed to have been that it went completely over his head.

          As for the truth, who actually knows what the truth is? I most cases the truth is how you see it because governments of all sides will try and hide the truth, in actual fact they have whole departments with huge resources gerrymandering ever snippet of information that ever reaches us. Anything they don't want us to know about is filed under some secrecy law until long after we have trotted off this mortal coil. I bet there are even some things the POTUS doesn't even know about and that is kept from him by the people who swear to serve him and the country!

    2. Quilligrapher profile image89
      Quilligrapherposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Greetings, Max. So nice to see you back from your latest ban.

      While you and Mr. Meyssan would like to convince the world that the US controls the ISIL, I must disagree.

      "The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) is an Islamist insurgent group active in both Iraq and Syria that pledged allegiance to al Qaeda in 2004." {1}

      In other words, they are mercenaries being paid by Sunni sympathizers to create havoc among the Shiite factions in Iraq and Syria.

      You have no evidence that the US government supports this group. I expect, based upon past performance, you will NOT provide any verifiable facts this time either. However, you are welcome to try.
      {1} http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2014 … evant?lite

      1. maxoxam41 profile image79
        maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

        And you give me, to contradict Meyssan's facts, a link to nbc's news. You have your opinion and I have mine. What makes you think that you are more righteous than me?
        Each time we are salivating on other countries natural resources, we attack it. Islamist mercenaries are our new weapons.

        1. Quilligrapher profile image89
          Quilligrapherposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Good morning, Max. I hope you are doing well today.

          I am pleased that you have your own opinion. That is just fine with me. For the record, I never contradicted Mr. Meyssan's facts. He has no facts. He has only personal opinions that he has never proven to be true.

          Just show the readers in this forum the proof that Mr. Meyssan is telling you the truth. Your posts are filled with vicious accusations that you can not prove either. 

          You have no proof. He has no proof. Yet, you believe everything he says without questioning his claims. He is paid to write lies about the US and you believe them because he says things you want to hear. It is your right to believe whatever you wish. On the other hand, I will not believe anyone who makes statements and claims they can not prove. I do not believe him and I do not believe you because neither of you ever produces proof. 

          Surprise me, Max. Show me your evidence.

          1. maxoxam41 profile image79
            maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

            He has facts. Each time he makes an assumption it is supported with evidence.
            Therefore myself, I can't see what our government is doing to the people or to Iraqis, Libyans.... I didn't need Meyssan to see that we were invading countries without justified but our greed. Am I inventing or did our troops use radioactive weapons to contaminate the Iraqi people of Fallujah? Was I dreaming when I saw American soldiers killing reporters thanks to Manning's leaking? Is fracking contamination a reality or a fiction? The documentary "gas land" is explicit as for its reality.
            But you believe nbc, what kind of irrefutable proof do they have? Can you show it to me?

  2. rhamson profile image76
    rhamsonposted 2 years ago

    If any of this is true it exemplifies the old adage "truth is stranger than fiction".

    1. maxoxam41 profile image79
      maxoxam41posted 2 years ago in reply to this

      When Meyssan makes a mistake he is the first to acknowledge it. But when you think about it, doesn't it make sense? The missing puzzles suddenly make sense. Why do we read or agree with A,B,C? Is it because after questioning ourselves we get to the same hypothesis? Or is it because as a being of reason the truth is unavoidable?