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Should Corporations Who Merged With Overseas Corporations

  1. rhamson profile image76
    rhamsonposted 2 years ago

    Be allowed to lobby Congress. Robert Reich posed this question recently and the answers were all over the place from globalization to isolationism as a way to "cure" it from happening.

    1. Credence2 profile image83
      Credence2posted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Greetings, rhanson, is there anymore background on this? I guess I always tend to think that there is far too much lobbying and influence peddling in Congress as it is.

      1. rhamson profile image76
        rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        With the recent musings of Walgreens merger (inversion) with a British pharmacy chain and wholesaler Alliance Boots, how many others have taken the step and not worried about the ramifications? Walgreens eventually did not do the deal and their stock fell.

        http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/08/06/ … s&_r=0

        Is it fair to reap the benefits of US citizenship and live in the protection of this country while not paying the corporate taxes? Furthermore is it fair to not support the country you profit from while hauling away tax free money that does not contribute to the welfare of its' citizenry?

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          As a UK citizen in what way do I benefit from US citizenship and protection?

        2. Credence2 profile image83
          Credence2posted 2 years ago in reply to this

          There is the source of that sucking sound akin to being subjected to a vacuum that explains where American jobs are going and why the Corporate structure want their cake and have the ability to eat it as well. I have long advocated for a tax code structure that reward American firms for continuing to contribute jobs within the American economy and not reward them for sucking the taxpayer and American consumer dry. I insist that those public servants that I place in office be in pursuit of these values.

          So my answer to your question is a resounding NO!!

          1. rhamson profile image76
            rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            The idea that globalization of the job market somehow rewards everyone has been sold to us for years by the only ones that seem to have profited from it. They continue to sell us this idea that they are creating jobs from this catastrophe is mindless prattle. The loss of jobs combined with the loss of tax revenue from those who created it is a corporate move without thought for the consequences. Those who offer up the idea that giving tax reductions to those who hide their money overseas while enjoying the freedom and lifestyle of this country have been sold snake oil and continue to think it is healthy for our country.
            The collusion that congress has with these corporations while fleecing the taxpayer is criminal to say the least. Unfortunately there are still many that think this is a party of affiliation ideology fight while not knowing the rewards are to those who look out for themselves. We are doomed to repeat this cycle as we have for the last hundred years as we do not recognize the culprit. The oligarchy runs this country and we are pawns to be sacrificed in their greedy quest. Until the country who is steadily becoming less educated and made financially impotent wakes up and takes responsibility for changing it, we will slide into the abyss. This is "ALL" our fault.

            1. Credence2 profile image83
              Credence2posted 2 years ago in reply to this

              Yes, indeed, bait and switch is the game. The attention of the masses has been diverted/misdirected toward relative minutia issues. This is the defining issue of our times, in the on going struggle between the have and have nots. The theft of the plutocrats is sanctioned at the highest levels of government. The point of this thread is just a part of a larger problem that is going to destroy the economic balance and relegate the middle class to a marginal existence. Both political parties are involved it is just that one seems to be more in a hurry to bring the apocalypse. Like the old pin ball machines you can keep the metal marble in play for a time but with a slanted deck eventually it will end up in the pocket, regardless. Just want to postpone that until more equitable solutions can at least be considered.

              1. rhamson profile image76
                rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                ....Both political parties are involved it is just that one seems to be more in a hurry to bring the apocalypse.

                I think that they are in more of a hurry to stick the Golden Goose as hard as they can before it is dead. The oligarchy that buys influence buys it from both sides and at the same time. They don't care who wins as long as they have the winner in their pocket The minutia keeps the idiots at bay while the expensive stuff is funneled just the way they want it to be. As far as the apocalypse they are only concerned with their own, thrown out of office.

  2. John Holden profile image60
    John Holdenposted 2 years ago

    There is nothing wrong with lobbying, it's a basic of democratic government.
    There is plenty wrong with cheque book lobbying which distorts and destroys democracy.

    1. rhamson profile image76
      rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      ....There is nothing wrong with lobbying, it's a basic of democratic government.

      Indeed lobbying is allowed under the Constitution. But its' perversion by bought influence is not. The problem is that congress can't be trusted to have any ethics when it comes to handling their options.
      Is a corporation who resides under another flag have the right to buy influence over those it does not support is the question?

      1. John Holden profile image60
        John Holdenposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        As I said, plenty wrong with cheque book lobbying. And it isn't just a problem with corporations residing under a different flag.

  3. John Holden profile image60
    John Holdenposted 2 years ago

    No rhamson, don't lay the blame on all of us, just lay it at the door of capitalist supporters.

    1. rhamson profile image76
      rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Nothing is wrong with capitalism as long as there is an even field to play it on. The trouble comes when the referees are paid to tilt the action.

      1. John Holden profile image60
        John Holdenposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Except that we are seeing capitalism reach its logical conclusion which is all the capital vested in a very few people, certainly less than there are countries in the world.

        1. rhamson profile image76
          rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Agreed that is ultimately the outcome when gone unchecked. The problem is how they make it unchecked. Figure that out and we may have a winner.

  4. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 2 years ago

    Isn't everyone allowed to lobby? What needs ti be limited is the representatives ability to accept bribes and be corrupt.  Not the right of people to try and influence them through cogent arguments.

    1. rhamson profile image76
      rhamsonposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      You have hit the nail on the head. Now how do we get the slime bags to change it is the real answer.

 
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