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Health care in America

  1. RKHenry profile image79
    RKHenryposted 7 years ago

    Recently I wrote a hub and a request on basic rights or privileges concerning health care in America.  Today one of my many news feeds had health care and this very idea on the front page. 

    Check the article out and I hope some opinions and suggestions will come out.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0326/p01s03-ussc.html

    As a twenty-something citizen of the United States, this very issue is my fore runner of the big 4.  If it is deemed a privilege, what's to be done for the millions that will be classified as unworthy?

  2. 0
    pgrundyposted 7 years ago

    The link goes to an article about the issue of some doctors and pharmacists wanting to refuse to provide contraceptives. Is that the issue you meant to address here?

    As far as health care in general is concerned, something has to happen. Otherwise the system will just collapse pretty soon. It's unsustainable as it is now.

    1. RKHenry profile image79
      RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      From the article, "Though freedom of conscience is a basic American principle, most people recognize that no right is absolute. The questions is: How far do providers' rights extend, and how are they balanced with the rights of patients?"

      Yes the article is about the moral issue dilimena of "making doctors perform procedures" that goes against their moral high ground.  But I didn't want this to become a "God" vs man topic.
      Sorry, I should've made that clearer.  My bad.

      But I will say this, in this article you will find that the dividing lines are being drawn here.  It is no longer becoming a grey issue, its more defined now to blue or red.  When a doctor takes the oath to save lives, he didn't take an oath to pick and choose.  At least that is my opinion.

  3. SparklingJewel profile image67
    SparklingJewelposted 7 years ago

    Well, it seems to me, even defining what "life" is, when it begins and ends, is part of the current lack of ability to come together to make decisions for everyone's benefit.

    So, until a consensus on "life" can be found, decisions may not be forthcoming. Or, maybe simple logistics of doctor accessibility within a clinic/hospital can be accomplished. Always have on duty a "provider" from both positions to meet the need of the patient.

    1. RKHenry profile image79
      RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Roe vs. Wade did decide that issue thirty years ago.

      1. SparklingJewel profile image67
        SparklingJewelposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        No, a law was put forth, it decided nothing based on the votes of the citizens as individuals of the nation. A law can not define and prescribe one's conscience beliefs, should not try...and that is one of the reasons why Roe V Wade was bad case law (or so I have heard from lawyers). It should be decided at the state level, so that the citizens can be represented.

        1. RKHenry profile image79
          RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          The voice of the law that governs the US is the Supreme Court.  They are part of the checks and balance system.  They did determine and decide that issue 30 years ago.  I wasn't even born. Yet, I still  know my girlfriend or any woman has the RIGHT to get an abortion in the USA if she wants too.  They did decide- whether you like it or not.  America often does not take populace votes to determine law.  That is why we have elected officials.  Do you live in America?  Do you fully understand America's form of Democracy?

    2. calebd profile image61
      calebdposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      This is silly relativistic crap. You don't need to equivocate nor should the rest of us have to suffer equivocation. If you're seeking that kind of balance, you ought to know that most doctors and nurses are fully aware of their job's responsibilities and are willing to carry out procedures. There simply aren't enough who don't for your solution. Also, what sort of service can a provider who refuses to do their duty provide? If you don't want to provide services that are routine, find a new job. If you're uncomfortable with having said services provided to you, go elsewhere. There's no need to conflate this issue with larger issues of consensus.

      1. RKHenry profile image79
        RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I agree. 

        I'd add that Doctors take an oath.  To hell with their religious beliefs.  Damn them if life is lost because of their policies.

  4. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 7 years ago

    I once had a dentist whose assistant, while cleaning my teeth, told me I had major cavities in my molars, and the dentist wasn't telling me because he wanted them to get so bad, that they would have to be pulled. He didn't pull molars. It was just the operating principle that the molars should be pulled. I went to another dentist, had the cavities repaired, and still have the molars 30 years later.

    1. Make  Money profile image72
      Make Moneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      That basically defines the simple solution to this topic.

      1. RKHenry profile image79
        RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        And that is???

        1. Make  Money profile image72
          Make Moneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Well knolyourself went elsewhere.

          1. RKHenry profile image79
            RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Well, that's just great. lol 

            I still leave the question [to you] as to what the simple solution is?

 
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