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Is America More Racist Now Than It Was 6+ Years Ago?

  1. GA Anderson profile image86
    GA Andersonposted 20 months ago

    In a conversation about racism in America today, a young relative,  made this statement'
    "It is worse than it was six years ago!"

    It took me a moment to catch his drift. He is a young, (many times naive), anti-Obama conservative and I took his comment to mean it is worse since Pres. Obama took office.

    My first impulse was to dismiss this as political rhetoric, then I had to pause to ponder the possible validity of his statement.

    Has our first black president brought racism in America*, (which has always been there in varying degrees),  to the forefront of our national conversation, or has he caused a focus that falsely amplified the problem?
    *not through intentional efforts, but just by being black

    Could the problem be similar to McCarthy's "Red Scare" efforts, ie. yes, there always was some residual racism, but now everything has potential racial connotations? In other words, as McCarthy saw a Commie behind every bush, are we now seeing racist motivations where prior to Obama we would have just seen acts for what they appeared to be?

    Or could it be that what was known but never talked about, (rampant inbred racism), is now being talked about?

    As for me, I want my cake and eat it too. I think he has brought racial discussions out of the closet, but I also think this has exaggerated the scope of the problem. I think Americans have made tremendous strides in this arena, but you would never guess that by the tone of today's news and national discussions.

    Much to McCarthy's dismay, there was not a Commie behind every bush, and every white interaction with blacks is not tainted by racism.

    What say you?

    GA

    1. IslandBites profile image85
      IslandBitesposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      I believe there is the same racism in US, just that now some people are openly racist more often. And yes, it has to do with Obama. Suddenly, there was a black in the highest position of power in the country (and the world) and it shifted things. So racists began to feel intimidated and more confrontational.

      That, also empowered black people to take their stand (in good ways, but also in bad ways.) In fact, this has also shifted black/white relations in the rest of the world.

      But, and this is my second point... There is also a wave of intolerance, not only in the US, but in the world. Not only because of skin color, but also because of nationality, religion, political views, sexual preferences and so on.

      Maybe is just because of new social paradigms and  power/political relations. Or maybe, there are social cycles where intolerance and violence peak so there's a "natural" population control. I hope not.

      1. junko profile image79
        junkoposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        America was built on racism and after the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's outlawed overt racism on the Federal level State and Local laws were passed to uphold racism throughout the United States. The Advancement of social Media has made the outcry that Black Live Matter possible. Six years ago if at lease two or three unarmed blacks a day was killed by law enforcement officers that fact would not be known nationwide within twenty four hours. Things that has happened for many years in places like Ferguson Mo. that when investigated showed how a majority black community was for years legally Embezzled. The facts of Ferguson and places like Ferguson could be called racism and it was happening while The President was in school. It how one looks at racism as a noun or a verb, I think its a verb and the actions screams racism then and now.

        1. GA Anderson profile image86
          GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Sounds like a lot of anger and grudge-holding behind your comment. But the question wasn't whether racism still exists, it was whether things are getting better or worse since President Obama took office.

          I agree that technological advancements have brought the most remote places and events to our immediate attention, but are those events more or less prevalent then before Pres. Obama?

          Do you think President Obama's skin color has harmed or helped America's journey to more equitable race relations?

          GA

          1. junko profile image79
            junkoposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            I would say that less prevalent since President Obama's election and his choice to lead the Justice Department. I think President Obama's skin color and thickness has helped restart America's journey toward a more equitable race relations There was no anger or grudge-holding in my comment. Hate and Anger are very bad spirits and I don't entertain either. I entertain truth and understanding. My comment was the truth based on my understanding. I also have an opinion about America and racism. I could have given a one word answer "No." then you may miss your ideas in my other words.

            1. GA Anderson profile image86
              GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

              OK, so we will let the "anger and grudge-holding" point fade from lack of attention because I agree with your first sentence in this comment.

              But like most serious public issues, the idiot fringes and sensationalists still try to control public perception.

              GA

              1. junko profile image79
                junkoposted 20 months ago in reply to this

                " Idiot fringes and sensationalist " Fox News msnbc and talk radio came to mind. Than i thought about the House and Senate in our nation capitol...now there for the last four years the idiot fringes and sensationalists has try to control public perception about the President and the Federal Government. Serious public issues don't make the news as much as Governmentlessness.

                1. GA Anderson profile image86
                  GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

                  While I won't join your choir regarding most of Fox news, (if you separate Hannity from the mix), nor all of talk radio, but I will sing with you concerning MSNBC.

                  It also looks like me may agree that many in our legislative bodies fit into that " Idiot fringes and sensationalist "  category. Not all of course. I do think we have some good legislators. We just don't hear about them over the din of those others...

                  GA

      2. Don W profile image84
        Don Wposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        Agree with much you said, but the term "sexual preference" implies that people have a choice about their sexual orientation. I don't believe that's the case. #justsayin

        1. IslandBites profile image85
          IslandBitesposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Yeah, my bad. I agree.

      3. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        The great things about opinions is that we all get to have our own.

        I certainly don't think we have the same racist attitudes we had in the past.

        A generation ago, (at least in my experience), the N-word was so casually used that many times it wasn't even intended as a pejorative. Now I can't imagine a main-stream conversation where it wouldn't at least rate discomfort and raised eyebrows - if not worse, like a loss of more sensitive acquaintances.

        A generation ago Ferguson, Trayvon, and Rice would not have made national news. Although I think this has a lot to do with our advanced technologies, I also think it has a lot to do with changes in white attitudes.

        And regarding your "... some people are openly racist more often.", let's put that into perspective... Of course there are a lot of idiot yahoos among us - the fringes, both the righteous and  the crude, and there always will be, so let's leave them out of the conversation and discuss the majority of folks. In which case I completely disagree with your point. Those "some" you speak of are the exception not the rule.

        I do agree with your point about a black president giving black people a sense of empowerment, but I don't see anything wrong with that.

        As to your second point "wave of intolerance," I guess I must be living in an isolated environment because I don't see it.

        What I see is the context of a handfull of illustrative events, (pick a number, 100 - 10,000), out of millions and millions of interactions. And that highly publicized handfull, while important and worthy of our attention, does not to me represent the attitudes of the majority.

        I think we have come a very long way from when I was growing up.

        GA

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          "I do agree with your point about a black president giving black people a sense of empowerment, but I don't see anything wrong with that."

          Really?  You don't see a problem with it?

          Opinions are worth what you paid for them, but mine here is that whenever the color of your skin is used for anything, from picking a marriage partner to feeling "empowered". there is something wrong and you are a part of the cause for a nation wide problem.

          1. Old Poolman profile image82
            Old Poolmanposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            Good answer.

          2. GA Anderson profile image86
            GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            "...but mine here is that whenever the color of your skin is used for anything, from picking a marriage partner to feeling "empowered" there is something wrong and you are a part of the cause for a nation wide problem."

            Yep, sure would be nice if that was the way the world and human nature worked, but the possibility of reaching an open door instead of a dead-end wall via the same effort makes all the difference in the world. And you know it, even though you proclaim the ideal you know the reality.

            How come you never invite me to your Galt's Gulch campfires?

            GA

            1. wilderness profile image96
              wildernessposted 20 months ago in reply to this

              Very true - human nature is to grasp whatever hope is offered, even a forlorn lost cause.  And to be racist, a part of wanting to be superior to anyone different as well as being afraid of differences.

              But we can, and should, all fight both of those feelings and do what we can to eliminate them from ourselves.  As long as they are considered normal and accepted we will find racism alive and flourishing.

              *edit*  I forgot to say - I had to look up the Galt reference, but if I ever attend the campfire, I'll make sure you get an invite.  It should be interesting.

        2. IslandBites profile image85
          IslandBitesposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Well, 6 years and Obama administration is not a generation ago. So yeah, 6 years ago, imo, there was the same racism.

          "I do agree with your point about a black president giving black people a sense of empowerment, but I don't see anything wrong with that."

          Not what I said. I said some people felt empowered to take their stand but in bad ways  (ie, with violence, intolerance, etc.)

          "Those "some" you speak of are the exception not the rule."

          I never said they are. Again, you asked if Is America More Racist Now Than It Was 6+ Years Ago? I say today racists are the same racists of 6+ years ago.

          "I guess I must be living in an isolated environment because I don't see it."

          I guess you are.

          1. GA Anderson profile image86
            GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            GA

    2. Old Poolman profile image82
      Old Poolmanposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      I believe racism has been on the increase thanks to the DOJ choosing to become involved in escalating situations when the facts were not even known.  By now most of us are aware that the "Hands up don't shoot" slogan that even found its' way to the halls of Congress was completely false.
      I wish racism would just go away and be forgotten, but that will never happen.  There are far to many on both sides who will never let it be.
      Nobody is born a racist, this is a learned behaviour.  As long as there are those willing to teach others to be racist the problem will exist.

      1. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        I don't see it that way. I see racism being more played-up by the actions you speak of, but I still believe for the majority of white Americans - racist attitudes are declining.

        And I don't think we should ever "let it be," but I also don't think we should allow the sensationalism of worst case events paint a picture of the majority of folks. For instance, I don't think "Ferguson" is what it has been turned into - a symbol of American race relations. I think it is a distortion of both the actual events that took place, and the state of mainstream American race relations.

        GA

    3. 60
      retief2000posted 20 months ago in reply to this

      A better question might be, "Is America more Racist now than 60 years ago," because the race hustlers say things that indicate they believe it is. There is a greater proportion of blacks in prisons today than in the heyday of race hatred. Why, race hustlers will shout "RACISM," of course, but perhaps it has far more to do with the destruction of the black family as a consequence of the welfare state.

      1. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        Yep, that would be a good question, but my question, as posed, has to do with the effects of our first black president on race relations.

        GA

        1. 60
          retief2000posted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Well that answer is easy. Barack Obama has done everything he can to fan the flames of racial tension where and when ever they arise, to the detriment of American.

          1. GA Anderson profile image86
            GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            Uh oh! Looks like we have have reached a stalemate. I don't see it and am certain you won't be able to convince me to see it as you do.

            GA

    4. Don W profile image84
      Don Wposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      Why is it that despite it being possible to see a plethora of racist incidents, comments and attitudes expressed against black people by searching google or youtube, that some people think the cause of racial problems is black people. Really!?

      How about this idea: the cause of racial problems in society is the fact that some people believe black people are inferior to white people. How about telling your young relative that?

      And how about telling him or her, that blaming black people for current racial problems, is like blaming a murder victim for making too much noise as they get murdered.

      If this is the nonsense young people are spouting, I seriously worry for the future. I'm stunned that someone could think this, and even more stunned that some people here seem to actually agree with it.

      Have people's sense of morality gotten so messed up that the idea of black people feeling "empowered" is now deemed to be the cause of racial issues. Wow. This just boggles the mind..

      What do you think "empowered" actually means . . ?

      1. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        You are not the only one stunned. I am stunned too. Stunned that you could twist the point of the OP to fit a barrage against a point never made.

        And I am stunned that we live in such different worlds that in my world I think it is a valid question to ask and discuss, but apparently not in yours.

        ps. If you also surfed YouTube and Google for good deeds I bet you would find a  plethora of those too. So whose  plethora is bigger and more indicative of today's American society?

        GA

        1. Don W profile image84
          Don Wposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Perhaps the issue is that society has not made as much progress with regard to race as some people thought it had. Overt racism has become socially unacceptable. That's progress of sorts. Unfortunately because of that, some people now think society is "post-racial". So we have a situation where even some black celebrities are boldly (and ignorantly in my opinion) announcing that racism is an "outdated" concept.

          The truth is that the country was founded with racism embedded within it's very constitution. That egregious violation of human beings at the birth of the nation, has infected the economies and institutions of the nation ever since, from law enforcement right through to education and employment. And while it can't be denied that great efforts and sacrifices have been made to change that, with some progress; Racism remains deeply embedded in the structures that make up the foundations of society, resulting in society being fundamentally racist.

          So when you say that you ". . . think [Obama] has exaggerated the scope of the problem". No he really hasn't. It's just that you (like many people) are underestimating the scope of the problem.

          1. GA Anderson profile image86
            GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

            I don't do any better with lectures now than I did when I was a kid. Especially when they are off topic.

            Once more, the OP was regarding this question; "Is America More Racist Now Than It Was 6+ Years Ago?"

            Do you have any thoughts on that question?

            ps. Where did I say that Pres. Obama has exaggerated the scope of the problem?

            And isn't it just your opinion that I underestimate the scope of the problem? Do you really feel so confident in your evaluation of racial issues in America that you are comfortable with your assessment of my perceptions based on so little interaction with me?


            GA

            1. Don W profile image84
              Don Wposted 20 months ago in reply to this

              Opening post: "As for me, I want my cake and eat it too. I think he has brought racial discussions out of the closet, but I also think this has exaggerated the scope of the problem". Whether you think Obama personally has exaggerated the scope of the problem, or whether you think his Presidency has (which is how I assume you would like to split hairs) my point is the same, and it's a point that I think directly addresses your question.

              If people underestimate the scope of the problem, and then someone or something highlights the true scope of the problem, they are deemed to have "exaggerated" it. Your comment is an example of that.

              Also, you seem to imply that any consideration of structural racism, and historical racism in relation to your question is "off topic". The fact you are unable to see the line that can be drawn directly from the early constitution, to levels of racism in society today, is another example of how the scope of the issue is underestimated. And yes I am criticising your view, but no that doesn't mean I don't think "it is a valid question to ask and discuss". I just happen to hold a different opinion to you on the subject.

              I think junko hit the nail on the head when he said: "the Advancement of social Media has made the outcry that Black Live (sic) Matter possible". The prevalence of the web and social media has changed since Obama came to office. I think that has had two effects on the issue of race: 1) anti-racism campaigns and messages like 'black lives matter' and 'I can't breathe' become much more widespread, more quickly, and 2) racist messages/incidents (actual and perceived) become more widely known, more quickly.

              Before the development of YouTube, Twitter, Facebook etc. such incidents happened, but whether they became "news" was arbitrated by the mainstream news media. Nowadays, traditional news media follows social media trends, often reporting on that as a phenomenon just as much as the incident itself. Hence the description of stories as having "gone viral".

              The fact that anyone capable of typing, can now broadcast any brain-fart to a mass audience, also means that people are now exposed to thoughts/attitudes/ideas they previously would not have been exposed to. You can go to the comment section of any YouTube video about race (and even videos that are nothing to do with race) and see for yourself the prevalence of racism in those comments. That's a shock to many people. It shouldn't be.

              Those attitudes, and the people who express them, have not just appeared from nowhere. They have been here all along. The only difference is that the web and social media exposes those attitudes to more people. That's not unique to racism. It could equally be asked "has sexism increased in the last 6+ years?", "has homophobia increased in the last 6+ years?" etc. By appearances is looks like they have. But I think that is a misperception.

              So, I agree with you, it is a valid question and it is worth discussing. I never said it wasn't. But I think the answer is no, America is not "more racist now than it was 6+ years ago". We are just more able to see those attitudes more explicitly expressed than we have been used to for a while, thanks to the anonymising and instantaneous nature of the web and social media.

              1. GA Anderson profile image86
                GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

                "... So, I agree with you, it is a valid question and it is worth discussing. I never said it wasn't. But I think the answer is no, America is not "more racist now than it was 6+ years ago". We are just more able to see those attitudes more explicitly expressed than we have been used to for a while, thanks to the anonymising and instantaneous nature of the web and social media."

                Why didn't you lead with that. I agree. We could have saved a lot of white space.

                ps. ya got me on that quote, I did not remember putting it that way.

                GA

                1. Don W profile image84
                  Don Wposted 20 months ago in reply to this

                  I like to explain my reasoning and "think" out loud.

    5. rhamson profile image76
      rhamsonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      I think the idea that Obama has brought race relations into the spotlight is an interesting theory rather than he has recreated racism in the country. His election showed us what we can accomplish from holding black slaves in contempt and in squalid conditions and for some the attaining of the highest honor that a man can achieve in this country. Unfortunately there is still an element of ignorance and distrust that pervades our society that cannot look beyond the physical and stereotypical images they have believed or been taught to believe. We all have prejudices that hide behind our actions whether positive or negative. The trick is to understand them.

      1. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        That was the point of the OP - has Pres. Obama, due to his skin color, affected racial issues. I agree with your point. I also don't think he has boosted racism. But as they say... Old habits die hard, and some of these old racial habits are kicking and screaming on their way out.

        GA

    6. Credence2 profile image85
      Credence2posted 20 months ago in reply to this

      Racism is not any worse than 6 years ago. It just so happened that the election of an African American president brought what racism was always here from a latent position to front and center on the national stage. Obama's very existence in of itself irrationally provokes racists and agitates them to revisit issues we all thought were behind us.

      1. IslandBites profile image85
        IslandBitesposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        100% agree. That was one of my points.

        1. Credence2 profile image85
          Credence2posted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Good point, IB, we are on the same wavelength.

      2. Old Poolman profile image82
        Old Poolmanposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        Outstanding Credence, you nailed it perfectly.  Hope all is well in sunny Florida.

        1. Credence2 profile image85
          Credence2posted 20 months ago in reply to this

          Hi, OP, it is too bad that we all cannot find a way in our all to brief existence to learn to get along....

          Thanks for weighing in

      3. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        Yep, that is the way I see it too. Although I might think of his election as having emboldened some of his antagonists to loosen their grip on some attitudes they might usually keep in the closet.

        Unfortunately the ones I am thinking of are of my generational age, not the, (or at least most of them), newer generation of folks.

        GA

    7. Cgenaea profile image60
      Cgenaeaposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      I think that racism is the same as it was 6years ago. I see a rise on the horizon though,  due to the fact that Blacks keep increasingly squawking about their "alleged" maltreatment... (they didn't do much rioting when Clinton held office, many more of them had jobs, but that's neither here, nor there.) Those black people riots are garnering a huge attention. Soon...there'll be water-hoses. I-I-I mean... tanks, gas, bullet-proof Hummers and curfews...
      It is MUCH more easily said that, "I have some good friends who are Black!!!" But, those underlying attitudes exist. I have seen it on my tiny corner of the universe, many times. That "attitude" pops out at the most inopportune times!!! Lol...
      People who don't, don't like to hear that there are people who prove and exclaim that they do...
      I saw the word nigger spelled out in plain English with no edit, here, earlier today. Now,  I hear that word several times a day, and WILL say it myself. (Don't judge me...lol) so I am not taken aback; but it was so strange to see it here... where all are so pc. No cutesy star edit... my "shit" has often been edited... just testing wink I cannot wait to see...
      But, yes, racism is just the same as the past 6yrs. Not more or less... steady-like.
      It IS more denied, but THAT very well may be because the current prez is mostly Black... However, there are at least two full-blown racists who will exclaim, with feeling,  "Why, some of my very best FRIENDS ARE BLACK!!!" Lol...

      1. GA Anderson profile image86
        GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        I think I agree with you that the level of racism is about the same, but I do think it is more played-up now. You can decide what the reason might be. I think it is because Pres. Obama is black - not because he has done anything, (I'm forgiving of those early too-early statements leading to beer summits and such), but just because, (I didn't start this thought), his skin color has "emboldened" both the pro and anti-racism folks.

        The blacks feel "empowered," (I did not originate that thought either - check the thread), because he is one of them, and the whites feel emboldened because he is one of them!

        I would not dismiss your Clinton thought as neither "here nor there," it is an interesting thought. Could the implication be that economics play a major role in behavior? (of course they do, fat and happy doesn't get upset as easily as lean and mean does)

        As to the N-word. I completely disagree. I find its use crude - and that has nothing to do with being PC. (an act I have never been accused of before)

        Whew! Glad to see I am not in that circle of full-blown racists you mention - because I don't have any black best friends. I knew a black man once. Then I knew another. Now I know several, and even some black women and kiddies too, but I don't think that counts.

        GA

        1. Cgenaea profile image60
          Cgenaeaposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          I've never felt any racist attitudes from you. But you have great thoughts (that agree with mine). I'm glad that you are aware though. Race is a sensitive area in this country. No, Blacks are not innately more or less anything. Period. The stats slant. And the attitudes of black inferiority exist.
          Emboldened by the black leader? Yes... it is ok to speak out now, the main executive knows, (may understand), and is able to execute major changes in the filthy system of petty selection that ruins opportunity in this country.
          The n word is not edited here........ I'm waiting on a response from "team..." as to why. It is offensive to many. But excused (somewhat representative of the systems of "the man") Black men loot. White people luckily find...

    8. 62
      Char Dickensposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      I think it's definitely more people being open with their racism because of Obama. And they see other racist people, and think their racist behavior is okay because they have "back-up". They use the "you're just pc" or "you're just too sensitive" as an excuse for their poor upbringing and lack of respect for other people. Also, it doesnt help that you call a mixed man black. By doing that you continue the notion that black people and white people should be kept separate, and promote the racist one drop rule that white people are pure.

  2. Alphadogg16 profile image88
    Alphadogg16posted 20 months ago

    Racism is pretty much the same as it's always been, whether it be 6 years ago or 20. I just think it's not displayed as freely now because of the many harsh public outrages that we have seen most recently. Nobody is born racist, it's an acquired/learned behavior. Until we are taught/educated consistently and equally, it will never go away.

    1. GA Anderson profile image86
      GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      Don't you think the majority of each generation, (let's put aside the fringe fraction of yahoos and idiots that will always be among us), since the 60s has become less and less influenced by skin color or culture? That's what I have seen in my children's generation.

      GA

  3. Kathleen Cochran profile image85
    Kathleen Cochranposted 20 months ago

    Those younger than 40 may not have the vantage point to see how much race relations have changed during their own lifetime.  But there are those of us who remember the regular use of the n word, separate schools and churches, whites only bathrooms, and all the extremes of making assumptions about a group of people simply because of the color or their skin.  Now that a member of that minority has become the most powerful person in the world, some attitudes have changed for the better, but some of the old attitudes have resurfaced in the glare of public scrutiny.  The ugliness of those attitudes are being seen for what they are, except by the very ones who still hold them.

    1. GA Anderson profile image86
      GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      Since I would need binoculars to look back at 40, I suppose it is no surprise that I think yours is a spot-on response. And the same reasoning probably explains why I think we have made such great strides combating the acceptance of racist attitudes. 

      GA

  4. ahorseback profile image50
    ahorsebackposted 20 months ago

    Because of  All  the worlds history , because of the relative youth of  America , because of the openness  of our modern day media and society   ,   And because , in many good  and not so good ways  Obama's administration  has brought , good and bad , the focus of race relations to the media's forefront ..

    America  however was not ," built on racism "  , America was born of a time of world racism and slavery , an so has evolved   alongside the very issues of  these cultural  manifestations .    Never before in our entire world history has  the instant and  often times  explosively , sensationalizing media  had such power over a society as now .

    No , America is simply  evolving along with the rest of the world , and quite often in far more honest and open  and advanced ways than the rest of the world.!    { this Is my point ]   Racism IS  anywhere and everywhere in the world !   however ,  I believe  we must always take the social  issues of the  "here and  now"  , discuss them ,  work them   , and push them  along  to the new levels of social maturity that they and we , all deserve .

  5. Disappearinghead profile image90
    Disappearingheadposted 20 months ago

    I think a fundamental problem is that people look at Obama and see a black president instead of seeing a president. As long as people label themselves as black, white or whatever, you will have racism. You cannot have an integrated society until people no longer notice the colour of skin.

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image86
      Kathryn L Hillposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      +1
      Prejudice is the real problem.

    2. Credence2 profile image85
      Credence2posted 20 months ago in reply to this

      We are all going to tend to favor our tribe over others. This kind of thinking will always be with us. We all have a. Prejudice over what we may consider beautiful or what is ugly.  We have to evolve as a species to see and deal with each other according to the ideal. Assuming a rate of improvement over what was the case in the US a century ago, I think that another century or two might do it.

    3. 62
      Char Dickensposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      Yes that is a problem. If they look amd see a black president instead of a mixed race one, then they still promote the racist one drop rule.

      1. ahorseback profile image50
        ahorsebackposted 6 months ago in reply to this

        You are wrong here though , It was Obama's  answer and  first salvo  in the  beginning to the origins of almost all   race issues today ,  ........" .Bring it on  ....."  was his first  implemented  dialog when asked  if  he thought race could  be an issue during  his administration . AND   at every step from then on ,  especially given  the Obama favoring media  throughout the last eight years  , racism was the first hot button to be pushed . 

        Obama , and his voting and  entire adversarial   following ,  all  cultural fans of the nostalgic sixties , wanted and so succeeded in reviving  the racial divide of  the sixties ! Truth !

  6. Kathryn L Hill profile image86
    Kathryn L Hillposted 20 months ago

    We all need to be color blind.

    1. Disappearinghead profile image90
      Disappearingheadposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      +1

  7. Cgenaea profile image60
    Cgenaeaposted 20 months ago

    The n word got thru... the s word did not... fancy that...

  8. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 20 months ago

    Sorry to say that racism is still operating but it is now more covert.  People are smart enough not to exhibit overt racism because it is looked down upon.  Also in many cases, overt racism will be punished, oftentimes severely.  An example of this is the racist chant by the University of Oklahoma's Sigma Alpha Epsilon regarding Blacks joining them.  As a result of the racist chant, many were expelled from the university and the fraternity was closed down. 

    Sadly, racism is a fact of life in American society and culture.  There is no avoiding it at all.  The election of President Obama demonstrates the true psychological nature of some Americans.  They feel quite uncomfortable that there is a Black family in the White House.  This disturbs that their particular status quo.  In their mindview, "How dare THEY be in the White House.  This is totally unconscionable indeed."   It is now a brand new playing field so to speak.

    In some instances, racism is more overt, especially by Caucasians who are threatened by the new, changing, more pro-active status of non-Caucasians in their environs.   The emergence of Blacks, Latinos, Natives, and/or Asians in leadership positions in America are making some Caucasians filled with anxiety, if not dread.  Studies have shown that with the election of President Obama, there is an increase of White nationalist groups in the United States.  There are even hyperbolic videos among such groups proclaiming the onslaught on the non-Caucasian upon the Caucasian. 

    To reiterate in the majority of cases, racism is sneakingly covert.  Even though Blacks and other non-Caucasians are increasingly in visible roles, they have to toll THAT line.  They cannot be really pro-Black, pro-Latin, pro-Native, and/or pro-Asian or they will lose whatever gains they have.   They have to play and act assimilated.  For example, in Hollywood, Blacks have to "be in their respective place" so to speak in order to get roles.  If a Black person acts too pro-Black, h/she is likely to be marginalized/ostracized in Hollywood.  The same goes in the corporate world, non-Caucasians have to be not too pro-active and be in their respective place so to speak if they want to promoted, even retain their jobs.

    1. junko profile image79
      junkoposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      O'k gmwilliams I think you just said that because its true.

      1. gmwilliams profile image86
        gmwilliamsposted 20 months ago in reply to this

        If one is Black or another non-Caucasian, no matter how educated and professional he/she is, he/she MUST constantly walk THAT line.  If  he/she goes beyond THAT line whether at work or in everyday associations, he/she WILL surely be put in  his/her societal place. The Black American commentator/director Tariq Nasheed eloquently indicates that Blacks are amply rewarded by the dominant for exhibiting certain behavioral mechanisms and punished if they exhibited more assertive albeit what is seemed to be threatening behavior as determined by the dominant culture.  This is the evidence that racism STILL exists to a certain degree.  For example, M'onique, the comedian/actress was blackballed in Hollywood because she refused to exhibit certain behavioral mechanisms which the dominant society value.
        http://s2.hubimg.com/u/12309215.jpg

        1. Quilligrapher profile image89
          Quilligrapherposted 20 months ago in reply to this

          This example has nothing to do with racism nor does Mo’Nique’s rejection by her Hollywood colleagues have anything to do with her race or theirs.

          Hollywood is a highly collaborative business in which success relies on the convergence of many talents in a cooperative environment. Mo’Nique revealed she was not a team player in the post-production phases of chasing the Oscars.

          Director Lee Daniels, who was the source of the “blackmail” remark, explained the reference in this way:

          “Mo'nique is a creative force to be reckoned with. Her demands through Precious were not always in line with the campaign. This soured her relationship with the Hollywood community. I consider her a friend. I have and will always think of her for parts that we can collaborate on. However, the consensus among the creative teams and powers thus far were to go another way with these roles.” {1}

          “It wasn’t that I was blackballed like Mr. Daniels said,” Mo’Nique told CNN. “The phone was ringing and the scripts were coming but the offers that were associated with them made me say ‘I can’t accept that.'” In another interview, the actress suggested that those “offers” weren’t particularly “fair,” either.
          {2}

          This Mo’Nique “example” is not about racism. It seems to be more about ego and money. Have I missed something?
          http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6919429.jpg
          {1} http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/m … ing-774616
          {2} http://www.thewrap.com/monique-claims-s … le-cookie/

    2. GA Anderson profile image86
      GA Andersonposted 20 months ago in reply to this

      "...People are smart enough not to exhibit overt racism because it is looked down upon."

      And that is the great stride I think Americans have taken in recent generations. I remember when it wasn't so "looked down on," and that is why I am so ardent in my opposition to such threads that proclaim otherwise.

      GA

 
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