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Another Police Officer Shows Extreme Unprofessionalism

  1. Don W profile image83
    Don Wposted 18 months ago

    Another example of unreasonable (and therefore unlawful) force being used by a police officer who was evidently away on the day they covered "de escalation" at the academy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R46-XTqXkzE

    1. rhamson profile image78
      rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      Not knowing what went down to warrant the detaining of the kids, I can't tell either way if the cop was reacting to the threat or escalating it. I did see a couple of white kids being held but there were many more black kids being held. The girl in the bikini was heeding the instructions and at one point was walking away as instructed. I think she said something smart to jack pot herself in it as well. The boy that came up behind the cop and acted as if he had something in his pocket or was just pulling up his pants almost got shot. I think it was more how quickly he moved at the cop than what he may have had in his hand if anything. They caught him as well.

      There was so much going on and disrespect it is hard to point to anybody as the culprit. I know when I was young if a cop told me to freeze I would do just that. I would not get into a legal discussion about my rights and further exasperate my chances of walking free.

      1. ahorseback profile image51
        ahorsebackposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        Exactly , the absolute disconnect between youth and any authority is most evident today . Simply put , ego , machismo , extroversion , those all important ingredients  in any gathering today .   In the sixties and seventies ,   If a cop ever told us to do anything right or wrong , we did it !   There is simply NO respect for anyone doing that job today .     I cannot sympathize with the idiocy of any culture that cannot act civil in a civil setting .

        1. Don W profile image83
          Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          I have no respect for any "man" who acts the way this police officer did. He acted like a petulant child, who seemed more upset because the 14 year olds were not taking him seriously. Being annoyed because a teenager is talking back, is not reasonable justification for a police officer to use physical force.

          1. rhamson profile image78
            rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            A video prior to her arrest shows her fighting with another girl. Not hearing the conversation I can only guess what she said. But she was identified as one of the fighters and was arrested for it against her wishes. Her struggling anf not following directions only made it worse for her.

          2. Lucky Onoriode profile image59
            Lucky Onoriodeposted 17 months ago in reply to this

            I agree with you, there was no need for such behavior. It seems he already had animosity against the kids before he even arrived.

        2. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          Does that not apply to the police?

      2. Don W profile image83
        Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        None of what you said justifies the officer throwing the girl to the ground, and kneeling on their back. If the officer did that because the girl "said something" then his use of force was unlawful.

        1. wilderness profile image97
          wildernessposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          And if he did it for some other reason it might have been quite lawful (although I thought he was kneeling on her spine, too, when he moved I had to say that perhaps he was not).

          I tend to think it was because he was out of control, and his subsequent resignation kind of bears that out. 

          But either way, to declare the incident to be "extreme unprofessionalism" is out of line with nothing but a phone video of part of the incident to go on.  It's the type of verbiage that resulted in the burning of Baltimore.

          1. Don W profile image83
            Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            The interaction played out between him and the girl was captured very clearly. She was talking back. He didn't like it, so he threw her to the ground; a 14 year old girl, who clearly posed a threat to his safety as she sat there in shock calling for her mommy. Meanwhile he's repeatedly swearing at a group of minors. Not only is his behaviour extremely unprofessional, it's also an abuse of authority. Resignation or not, unless he can prove that his use of force against that girl meets the criteria for the use of force, he should be arrested and charged with assault.

            1. wilderness profile image97
              wildernessposted 18 months ago in reply to this

              And I agree that " unless he can prove that his use of force against that girl meets the criteria for the use of force, he should be arrested and charged with assault".

              I just disagree that viewing that short (and partial) record of the entire episode gives you or anyone else to claim "unprofessionalism" on the part of the cop.  You simply do NOT have the information necessary to make that claim.

              1. Don W profile image83
                Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

                His swearing alone was unprofessional. He's supposed to act calmly under pressure, not swear at kids because they are talking back to him, let alone throw them to the ground. His chief of police said "He came into the incident out of control, and as the video shows, was out of control during the incident". So yes I think we can judge his actions as unprofessional based on the video. Glad to see the Chief is not blindly closing ranks as usually happens. I wonder if the officer will now be held accountable for his actions and charged with assault. I doubt it. Wouldn't it be refreshing though if the officer held a press conference, admitted his behaviour was unacceptable, and offered a heartfelt apology to the community. I suppose that would be too much to expect from the sort of "man" who throws a 14 year old girl to the ground for being sassy.

          2. John Holden profile image60
            John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            Perhaps if the police had been wearing body cameras the whole situation would have been much clearer.

          3. Motherbynature profile image82
            Motherbynatureposted 17 months ago in reply to this

            It's absolutely not that cut and dry. There's much more than a cell phone video. The kid who shot the video filled in all the blanks for us in more than a few news interviews. He tells the whole story. Other teens have also given their accounts about being antagonize by one of the white parents.

            As for Baltimore, and any other riots including Watts and L.A., people didn't take to the streets until all witness accounts and evidence we dismissed and pissed on by the justice system. Stop acting like people saw a clip on the news and just ran out and started setting sh*t on fire.

            1. wilderness profile image97
              wildernessposted 17 months ago in reply to this

              Don't be ridiculous; people very often take to the streets and riot only hours after such an incident.  They don't care one iota about truth or justice; just in promoting a political power structure (promoters of a riot) and in stealing and destroying (those actually rioting).

              So yes, seeing a clip on the news is sufficient reason for all too many to riot and set sh*t on fire.  Especially when there's a free TV or pillowcase in it for them.

              1. Motherbynature profile image82
                Motherbynatureposted 17 months ago in reply to this

                Name one such incident.

                1. wilderness profile image97
                  wildernessposted 17 months ago in reply to this

                  LA.  Police had barely begun an investigation when the riots took place.  In fact, I don't believe there has been a single riot after a police incident where an investigation was completed - rioters don't care what the facts are.  A cell phone video, claims from "witnesses" (that also don't care about truth) are all that it takes.

                  1. Motherbynature profile image82
                    Motherbynatureposted 17 months ago in reply to this

                    Which riots are you talking about?

                  2. Motherbynature profile image82
                    Motherbynatureposted 17 months ago in reply to this

                    L.A. riots? The one where the police investigation led to a trial, which led to acquittal? You really need to take another look at thattimeline. I live in L.A. and that isn't how it unfolded.

        2. rhamson profile image78
          rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          You should see her in the fight that preceeded the video you posted. It was a real catfish with adults trying to separate them. I don't like seeing disturbing footage like this anymore than you but I also would not want to be the cop thrown into this situation. They are trained to take control of the situation. This girl was just out of control prior to this scene.

          1. Don W profile image83
            Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            She was clearly not involved in a catfight at the time he threw her to the ground so his use of force was unreasonable. That was not taking control. It was an assault of an unarmed 14 year girl. In fact the only person "out of control" was the police officer himself, an assessment his own Chief of Police apparently agrees with: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9AagT2zUkY

    2. Credence2 profile image87
      Credence2posted 18 months ago in reply to this

      a main problem, the 14 year old girl was walking away and the cop retrieved her because of what she said? There was no grounds to accost this teen, none whatsoever. Why just the black kids, were not any of the white kids involved? It was a presumption of innocence of the white teens, without anyone really knowing who was guilty and who was not? The use of unrestrained profanity by this officer toward the teens was not professional.

      Of course, investigation is needed and warranted, as to whether excessive force was employed and also whether there was equal administration of the law and its application on the scene by this officer

      1. rhamson profile image78
        rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        Look for the video prior to this one. The girl was involved in a fight prior to this video. And yes I think if you have a big mouth and lack of common respect there should be accountability for it. As far as an only black thing look in the beginning as there are a couple of white kids being told to sit down and shut up as well. Guess what? They heeded the cops advice.

        1. Credence2 profile image87
          Credence2posted 18 months ago in reply to this

          Alright, RH, I will look at the previous video. But wasn't the girl going away from the scene? There is no crime in talking back to the police officer to justify his manhandling of her. The accountability is not arrest and being accosted. I am free to say whatever I like, no crime is committed

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            As you walk out of the bank just after a robbery it and the cop demands you stop and get on the ground, you go ahead and sass him and walk away.

            Then explain to the judge that he had no right to use force to stop you and put you on the ground.  That you can say and do whatever you wish regardless of any circumstances or what is happening around you.  I dare say it won't go down will with the judge either.

            1. Credence2 profile image87
              Credence2posted 18 months ago in reply to this

              I think that she was told to go away and she was doing that, he just did not like her smart mouth. I think that that was his problem, he ran after her and subjected her to the abuse because she 'talked back'. While that cop was swearing like a sailor in the midst of minor children. That lefty side of me does not like people that abuse discretion in regards to their power and authority.  Iwas asked to present identification by some plain clothed person at the Denver airport some 40  years ago and I was a smart kid too, he threatened me when I asked to see his credentials. He got indignant about the fact that I dared to ask for it. Was I not justified, I just don't give my ID to anyone who asked for it. and I knew what the cops could and could not do. That sort of thing annoys me and I think that is what the cop did with the young girl. I don't like folks to use authority solely to imtimidate me, without justification.

          2. rhamson profile image78
            rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            I found the video prior to this one where the fight was under way. I could be mistaken as the bikini the girl in the fight was wearing is similar to the one the girl who got arrested was wearing but not the same. Maybe the cop was mistaken as well or the witness's that may have pointed her out. Anyway he has resigned and maybe some others have learned from this.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAtq_K8XSG8

    3. Motherbynature profile image82
      Motherbynatureposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      The way people defend this cop is sickening.  The boy who filmed the whole thing even said it was crazy how he, as a white boy, seemed invisible to the cop.  So how did this cop pick and choose to detain, since he showed up and had to assess the situation without knowing who did what?  IDGAF what that girl said to him but it didn't warrant him manhandling her.  That's the same excuse woman-beating assholes use, "She was running her mouth". Get outta here with that BS if you try to justify this.

  2. Chriswillman90 profile image93
    Chriswillman90posted 18 months ago

    There's a lack of community policing and not enough accountability for the officers. I'm sure the growing lack of respect is because cops are distancing themselves more from the community than in the past. The struggles between civilians and the police has been long documented and there were plenty of historic periods where corruption and excess violence reigned. We need to preach respect among the youth and the police as well as more communal interaction otherwise it'll be a lost cause.

  3. Live to Learn profile image80
    Live to Learnposted 18 months ago

    My observation of police officers has been that most are bullies before they join the force. This video is not surprising to me at all. I hope the one who threw that girl to the ground is the one that got suspended.

  4. ahorseback profile image51
    ahorsebackposted 18 months ago

    Not many of you here are addressing the FACT that there is little respect by anyone today towards -any authorities .  I have little room for sympathy for fools ,  on either side of the law .  But the first response today by most  people is wrong to begin with .  "Why are you singling out me [ or my child ]?"   

    Instead most  of you are  seeing the racial difference , more than likely  it is those of you who do that ; that are the real  racially motivated whiners .    Not more than three decades ago  there would have been pretty much nothing but respect for the police , even if you wanted to react  like a child .

    And if a thirteen or fourteen year old can break the laws like an adult , they can suffer the consequences , like an adult !   There are bad cops of course , but  for the most part , there is far more idiocy in the  youthful  party crowd.

    1. Don W profile image83
      Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      I haven't mentioned race once. Not in the opening post, or in any subsequent posts. I think there are questions about race to be answered, but I haven't asked them here.

      More respect for police 30 years ago? I don't think teenagers in 1985 had any more or less respect for police than teenagers in 2015. Besides, why should anyone respect a grown man who is behaving like a child having a temper tantrum? Because he will use unreasonable force against you if you don't? That's unacceptable. And talking back is not "breaking the law". Neither is being a immature. Teenagers are immature by definition. They typically do not have the same level of knowledge and experience as adults. If a police officer can't deal with getting some sass from a teenager without resorting to profanity and violence, then he is in the wrong profession. This situation turned nasty because of the out of control actions of one police officer who couldn't control his temper, and it is right to criticize his behaviour. Thankfully he is not representative of all police officers.

      1. rhamson profile image78
        rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        "Besides, why should anyone respect a grown man who is behaving like a child having a temper tantrum? Because he will use unreasonable force against you if you don't?"

        Don: I agree with a lot of what you say but anyone with common sense should acquiesce to the guy with the gun. If you have complaints they should be filed later with the corroborating witness's and video.

        1. Don W profile image83
          Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          While calm acquiescence to unjustified police violence might be the most rational response, the expectation that people will react that way is unreasonable, because people are not robots. The expectation that a police officer will remain calm and rational, however, is reasonable, because 1) that's what they are trained for, and 2) that's what the majority do, most of the time. So I think it's unfair to criticize this girl for having a reasonable expectation that a police officer will act rationally, and it's unreasonable to criticize her for failing to recognize the danger of not passively submitting to a police officer who was, in the words of his own police chief, "out of control". She reacted exactly the way I would expect any 14 year old girl to react after being thrown to the ground by a full grown man: with anger, fear, shock and a desire for someone to call her parents. There was nothing wrong in her reaction.

          Ultimately, a child's safety should never be dependent on their ability to behave more rationally than a police officer. That's an unfair, unreasonable and unacceptable expectation.

          1. rhamson profile image78
            rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            14 years old is not a baby and there should be some degree op respect already ingrained in her character somewhere. What has this whole incident taught the young girl? That if you yell and scream and resist you will get your way? What if by her distraction the boy seen approaching the cop from the back had a knife or gun? The cop feared something like that could indeed have happened. That is why the gun was drawn. Ultimately the right thing happened and no one was hurt but the whole thing could have had a different ending had the adolescents not begun a fight and the police not needed. Obviously an adult in the situation called the police to get order out of chaos. Eventually that happened with a few parents coming out and saying the police reacted as they had wished. Their words, not mine.

            1. Credence2 profile image87
              Credence2posted 18 months ago in reply to this

              Yes, RH, but respect is a two way street. The cop by treating the kids like animals and throwing around expletives, did not behave professionally which is the basis of mutual respect. The black kids even in the video still seemed to be getting the brunt of the results of the melee. What about the white female that instigated this with her assault?  In spite of perceptions by whites, these anomalies always seem to appear and less and less random.  Yes, he was suspended and probably should be fired for using poor judgment. I can't visualize this officer waving his firearm around threateningly among a bunch of white teens who "got out of control'. Conservatives always speak about race-neutral, we still have a long way to go before we reach that milestone.

              1. rhamson profile image78
                rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

                In a situation such as this the cop is supposed to take control of it. Being surrounded by menacing yelling and screaming does not lend itself to calm and rational conversation. And when approached from the rear it goes south in a hurry as witnessed on the video. If you wish to make it a racial thing I guess you have some evidence but don't you think for a minute that black kids are the only one being singled out.

                Years ago as I was traveling between L.A. and D.C. in Arkansas I was singled out as a white male driving an older Dodge or Plymouth. I pulled up to a gas station to fill my tank and was promptly surrounded by three cop cars. They got out and drew down on me. What should I have done in response as I had done nothing wrong? Should I have gotten out of the car and started yelling at them to leave me alone as I had not done anything wrong? Should I have espoused my legal rights to demand evidence as to why they treated me in this threatening manner? Mind you these were deputy sheriffs who thought they had a bank robber. I put my hands on the wheel and waited and FOLLOWED all of their instructions. I listened as the radio dispatch described me to a tee. The only thing missing was I did not have a beard. They even rubbed my face to be sure I had just not recently shaved. They let me go in about an hour and I was on my way. The moral to the story is just to do what they say and let them figure it out. If you bark and bellyache about your rights the cops become immediately suspicious of your innocence and will match your anger or respect either way you want it.

                A side note is that this all happened in front of a barbequed chicken joint next door where everyone wide eyed had their noses plastered to the window watching it all go down. When the cops let me go I went inside to get something to eat and they all stared at me like I was some sort of criminal. When I couldn't take it anymore I turned to the dinning room and said "they had the wrong guy, it wasn't me". A bunch of them laughed and went about eating.

                1. Credence2 profile image87
                  Credence2posted 18 months ago in reply to this

                  You are a cool dude, RH, lets get this out on the table.

                  As an adult, you assessed the situation and behaved appropriately, of course. Adolescents are known for poor judgment and impulsive behavior. Heck, I was no different at that age. I don't expect the reasoning skills of a 14 year old to approach that of an adult. There is a bumper sticker that said "Hurry, hire a teenager, while they still know it all"!  Regardless of upbringing, teens are prone to get into trouble for just the things that I mentioned earlier. I expect professional law enforcement people to take these kinds of things into account when doing their job.

                  As for the race thing, check it out, statistics consistenly support a disparity on treatment of AA males and that of whites when confronted with the law officer on the beat, or highways and in the criminal justice system by the judges and juries. Statistics say that blacks are treated with less leniency regardless of the fact that their records and offenses do not differ from that of a omparable white suspect. I can produce stats if you want them. The 'machine' responsible for these disparities is not monolithic, but is made up of individuals; their reactions, judgment and,yes. prejudices. The cops that killed the 12 year old boy in Cleveland, killed the young man in Ferguson, leaving his corpse to rot on the street for 5 hours without contacting anyone, are no more than Borg drones, operating on behalf of the collective. But who is keen to the telepathy and its source that control their behavior? There seems to be an all encompassing attitude by whites toward blacks, pervasive, that people just as soon not acknowledge nor talk about openly. The rage and resentment expressed by the white lady in the Dallas suburb to the point that she assualted a young black woman. But the results of that attitude are shown in the general statistics that must trump any of our individual experiences in this matter.

                  1. rhamson profile image78
                    rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

                    Living near some major highways I have seen your scenario played out time and time again where you have a car pulled over with a black male being ticketed or waiting for a drug sniffing dog to get there and go through the routine. We politely call it a DWB (driving while black). Truth be told every now and again I see a white dude wearing all the gang gear and tattoos that profile him rather easily. Usually there is something like a tail light out of they are speeding but so where many others that were not pulled over. As more and more poor are in desperate situations the criminal element will arise. They are then easy pickings for the profile. How do you train a cop to ignore his instincts? It could cost him his life.

                    As far as being cool under fire and doing what the cops wanted me to do I was raised that way. I was about 26 years old when that happened. I had a few more wild years in me but I always respected the law and the guy who put his life in harms way to protect mine. There were and still are a few bad apples in the barrel but I will give them the benefit of the doubt until they prove me wrong.

                2. Don W profile image83
                  Don Wposted 18 months ago in reply to this

                  The logical conclusion to what you are saying is that there should be unquestioning obedience to police officers, from every member of the public, at all times, regardless of circumstances, under threat of injury or death. Well that's what a police state looks like, so I sincerely hope you don't get your wish.

                  It's not untypical for a teenager to get into a fight. It's not untypical for a teenager not to listen to an authority figure (let alone one who is acting less mature than them). It's not untypical for a teenager to be confused, angry, shocked and scared after being thrown to the ground by a fully grown man. It is untypical and unprofessional for a police officer to launch into a tirade of profanities in front of a group of minors. It is untypical and unprofessional for a police officer to throw a teen to the ground due to losing his temper. It is untypical and unprofessional for a police officer to behave in a way that causes his Chief of Police to describe his behaviour as "out of control". No, the girl was not the issue. Nothing she did, or did not do, in that video, justified the police officer's actions against her.

                  And swearing, and being violent is not what "taking control" looks like. It's what being out of control looks like. Teachers take control of classrooms full of unruly, sulky, disobedient, disrespectful teenagers every day without swearing and throwing them to the ground. Not all teenagers are like that, but it's fair to say a good proportion are. Perhaps that police officer should have taken some lessons from a highschool teacher.

                  Whatever way you look at it, the officers' actions towards that girl are inexcusable. Yet people still want to try to shift some of the blame onto her because she wasn't a perfect victim, despite the offices' boss describing his actions towards her as "indefensible". Trying to defend the indefensible doesn't make much sense to me.

                  1. ahorseback profile image51
                    ahorsebackposted 18 months ago in reply to this

                    Once again , you guys are categorically condemning  ALL police behavior to one or two  incidents . Yes - one should always obey an officer of the law !  And to do it till it hurts [figure of speech ] even when you know he's wrong  , first  and always and only IF  you know one is acting out of order , then  you file a report  after the incident  ,, hire an attorney , or question in some way the proper authority .    Only an idiot would  fight the cops and expect anything  but getting arrested .   

                    There used to be a saying when I was growing up " You can't out-run a police radio "   , unfortunately  our  youth culture today gets all puffy chested in front of a crowd - sooo , whatever happens , happens !

                  2. rhamson profile image78
                    rhamsonposted 18 months ago in reply to this

                    I don't think there should be unquestioning obedience. For example inappropriate or unreasonable requests. But other than that and especially in a crowd control situation you should adhere to the instructions until a calmer time can make explanations and arguments be heard. A cop is trained to gain control of the situation first, identify the problem and then take appropriate actions to remedy the disturbance. Rushing the cop from behind is not going to get you a arm around the shoulder and a how do you do.

                    Do we know what she said or did to set the cop off? Do you? There was a lot of action happening at one time. The cop came out today and said it was a very stressful situation and he reacted poorly to it. It was his training that prevented anybody getting shot. He felt threatened and outnumbered. Very stressful in my mind.


                    Have you been around young people recently. Cussing and trash talking is the norm. If the cop was hearing that coming his way what would be the proper kind of language he should have used?

                    I don't want to shift any blame on the girl, just her actions. When told to get down on your stomach you should do it. He held her with his knee in her back because he did not want to let his guard down long enough to cuff her. It is very disturbing to watch. Young people are so used to talking back to their elders inappropriately that this is just another example of a spoiled little girl not getting her way.

      2. John Holden profile image60
        John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        Without knowing what went on before I found it surprising to see such a heavy police presence for what seemed like a peaceful group of kids.
        Surely one or two could have defused that situation. Teenage girls (and boys) fight. They rarely do each other any harm and more often than not, ten minutes later they're inseparable friends again.

        It's not surprising that the police are held in so little respect. Since when has idiotic behaviour on its own been a criminal offence?

        And Wilderness, these kids weren't robbing a bank, they weren't even threatening a bank! They were having fun, or is that unlawful as well?

    2. Motherbynature profile image82
      Motherbynatureposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      Know who else saw the racial difference?  The boy who shot the video.  Now tell that child that his eyes deceive him.  Go ahead and discount his feelings and his own first-hand experience.  That is dismissive and lazy thinking.

  5. ahorseback profile image51
    ahorsebackposted 18 months ago

    I pick up the news paper and  read , story after story  involves the immaturity of youth - AND their parents ,   How many times do we see parents  in a fighting mode  because of the  " My children wouldn't ever do that " syndrome ?    I've seen it  being on  juries , I've seen it in the courts and in our schools ,to say nothing of our college campus'   , ........in reality it's more like " the terrible two's" has  evolved  , somehow,   right into adulthood !

    We can blame stupid cop's all day , there are a few around but for the most part  it's behavioral problems born of  the  lack of  social maturity  of our youth .

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      "Immaturity of youth"!

      You couldn't make it up. What do you think maturity is?

  6. ahorseback profile image51
    ahorsebackposted 18 months ago

    I have not watched THIS video , But still,  there is a  major plague of disrespect for all authority in American youth culture  .   And it begins at home  with the new waves of free range child rearing  today .   It is so obvious  , we've laughed about it coming out of canned sit coms on TV for two or three decades , we've seen it out of Hollywood  rag papers , it's been this way in  our schools , from grade school to college .   Try to sit down in a restaurant  for a quiet meal  , it's right there at the table next to you  , it's there .In traffic , in  small towns and in the cities .

    I don't feel bad for those who are arrested  or  for there parents that have raised  and nurtured such  generally lousy social behavior in their off-spring .  Are there bad cops' too ? Sure .  But if the stress of dealing with bad attitudes  for a living  is what they have to contend with , this is  what's going to happen . 

    We all love the song , "Teach your children well " , but have we? , I think not so much .

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      I suggest then that you spend a few minutes to view the video of a grown man throwing around like a rag doll, a girl half his size. While you are at it perhaps you can tell us all what threat she presented to the officer.

      If you watch it it might go some way to explaining why there is such a lack of respect for the police.

  7. PrettyPanther profile image86
    PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago

    Once again, we have the usual suspects doing their usual routine.  Excusing the behavior of the armed, trained (supposedly), brave (supposedly) authority figure who also is a public servant while blaming the victims, who in this case, are minors.

    Hmmm, brave adult trained to protect and serve the public can't handle a pool party without tossing around little girls in bikinis by the hair and pulling a gun on unarmed boys.  So brave.  So well trained. Such a role model.

    roll

  8. ahorseback profile image51
    ahorsebackposted 18 months ago

    One or two in a million ,  what we need to do is keep it all in perspective , NOT take a few incident's out of context and generalize all cops as being   just like these !    I have never been treated without respect by a cop  , and they have had reasons to do just that .   
    Trying  all police in the public forum court is like a cheap  Hollywood script !
    Believe me - the lawsuit will pay off  for  all the bratty kids, they will never have to work again  !

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      I take it that you didn't find the time to watch the short video!

      1. ahorseback profile image51
        ahorsebackposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        No , nor do I have to , to make my point John .

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          Your point then is based on your prejudices and not on evidence.

  9. ahorseback profile image51
    ahorsebackposted 18 months ago

    Here's a few facts , 114 police officers killed on duty in 2014  , 46 of whom were shot to death .   I haven't read so many forum posts about that either ,   nor will we I suppose and why ?    Because  we in Hub Page forums  don't look at statistics  , we flare up the old reactionary threads about a couple of spoiled brats being arrested ? Anyone want to make a hub about cops killed on the job , Ya.....that's what I thought .  Want to ask why --look at the "Related Discussions  Below "

    This is what I mean about keeping things in perspective ,  thereby not sensationalizing  an incident taken out of context , just saying . Who are we anyway , the mainstream media ?

    1. PrettyPanther profile image86
      PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      176 civilians killed by police so far in 2015, from an article posted onMarch 6, 2015.  So, if that rate continues, then well over 1000 civilians will be killed by the police before the end of this year.

      Perspective.

      Police officer deaths in 2014:

      Line of Duty Deaths: 134
      9/11 related illness: 7
      Assault: 2
      Automobile accident: 27
      Drowned: 2
      Duty related illness: 3
      Fire: 1
      Gunfire: 47
      Gunfire (Accidental): 2
      Heart attack: 19
      Motorcycle accident: 4
      Struck by vehicle: 5
      Vehicle pursuit: 5
      Vehicular assault: 10

      Perspective. 

      By the way, as is your usual MO, you accuse anyone who thinks a particular cop has behaved criminally of lumping all cops together.  I haven't seen anyone do that.  However, it is evident that something is wrong with the training cops receive.  So many of them seem to be cowards, given how often they "fear for their life" when their victims have no weapon, and are homeless, or disabled, or a teenage girl sitting in a police station, or a deaf black man walking home from work, or a veteran with PTSD sitting in a chair with his hands tied in a police station, or a 91-year-old man barricaded in his bedroom, or a young professional walking down the street wearing headphones.

      Shall I go on describing the types of citizens who drive fear into the hearts of heavily armed officers of the law?

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        "By the way, as is your usual MO, you accuse anyone who thinks a particular cop has behaved criminally of lumping all cops together."

        How else can anyone read your statement that:

        "Once again, we have the usual suspects doing their usual routine."

        1. PrettyPanther profile image86
          PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          I was referring to those who would defend obviously criminal acts by  law enforcement by trying to place blame on the victim.  We even had some defend the cop who shot the man running away 8 times in the back.

          That's what I meant by the usual suspects doing their usual routine.

      2. ahorseback profile image51
        ahorsebackposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        Oh please do , why stop generalizing at this point !  I mean you didn't list  WHY these innocent civilians   were all killed by police .

        1. PrettyPanther profile image86
          PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

          I could post all the videos but you wouldn't watch them, because it wouldn't be related to your point, right?

          1. John Holden profile image60
            John Holdenposted 18 months ago in reply to this

            He won't even watch the video related to this thread!

            Maybe concerned that it will confront his prejudices.

            1. PrettyPanther profile image86
              PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

              Yes, he's trying to avoid the discomfort of cognitive dissonance.

      3. Motherbynature profile image82
        Motherbynatureposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        There are plenty of good cops.  Plenty.  What sucks is that the good cops should be trying to force out the bad ones but the system makes it hard for them to do so.  Those who have tried speaking out have been bullied, threatened and even killed by rogue cops for snitching.  So it's easier for them to say nothing at all.  I feel sorry for those who want to do something but feel powerless.  A rogue cop gets more support from the protective league than a good cop who wants to weed out the bad ones.

  10. aware profile image70
    awareposted 18 months ago

    I see outnumbered  police. Trying to get control of a bunch of  kids  that have no respect for the law. Teach  kids to  respect authority.  I see. Running .i see evading. I see argumentative youths doing everything but  being cooperative.  I see    a out of control mob.no wonder cops get frustrated

    1. Motherbynature profile image82
      Motherbynatureposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      I see a bunch of scared kids running from the cops because they're thinking of the last boy that got shot in the back, and the guy who cooperated by dropping to his knees only to be choked to death, and Oscar Grant who was shot point blank in the head while cooperating and in handcuffs.  Or what about Freddie Gray, who allowed himself to be cuffed and loaded into a van only to show up at the station with a broken neck?  Academy training is there for a reason.  Being a cop is a scary situation and you can lose your life, but you also have the power to take a life.  If the academy can't get you to respect your ability to lose and take life, YOU ARE UNFIT.  PERIOD.

    2. PrettyPanther profile image86
      PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      Good thing you're not a cop.  Too bad so many are like you.

      1. aware profile image70
        awareposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        I see  your the judge and jury. To bad so many are like you. Bad cops act just like  that.

      2. PrettyPanther profile image86
        PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

        "I see    a out of control mob.no wonder cops get frustrated"

        No, merely noting that your statement coincides with how the officer treated a group of teenagers.  Since you saw "an out of control mob," it follows that yanking a teenage girl around by the hair is justified, pulling a gun on a couple of unarmed teenage boys is justified.  No?

        I see an attitude similar to that cop, or are you saying you don't think his actions were justified?  Somehow I missed that.

  11. aware profile image70
    awareposted 18 months ago

    I watched  the video.  Scared of getting in trouble . I saw. . Makeing martyrs of  crooks like  grey. Will only breed  more  people like gray.   Arrested 18 plus times  poisoning  his community  with  drugs. This  is  the black  youths hero.  If  our kids think that the police are just out to kill them.  Well  their wrong. Exceptions  are not the  rule

    1. Motherbynature profile image82
      Motherbynatureposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      Your bio says you're aware of your shortcomings. LMAO!

    2. PrettyPanther profile image86
      PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      Sorry, but killing a man while in custody is a crime, unless it is in self-defense.  Doesn't matter if the man was a drug pusher, serial killer, or pedophile, although many that are killed in custody or on the street by cops have committed no crime at all.  We have laws for a reason.  Interesting that you care about enforcing laws for some people and not others. 

      No one is saying Freddie Gray is a hero.  You're using the tired tactic of misrepresenting the opposing viewpoint so you can more easily refute it.  Requires less intellectual effort that way?

  12. aware profile image70
    awareposted 18 months ago

    Im not  defending  anyone.  I think it was  his tazer  he pulled.  Two  Other  cops  stopped  him didnt they .if i was on a review board id say that  the one cop started  to act out of anger. And id recommend  he be dicaplined.

  13. aware profile image70
    awareposted 18 months ago

    Btw. Im for putting  bad cops in prison for breaking  the law. And if  they murder a innocent.  Im for putting  them  to death by lethal  injection.

    1. PrettyPanther profile image86
      PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      Glad to hear it.  So, would you support bringing assault charges against the McKinney cop?  After all, he assaulted that girl.

  14. maxoxam41 profile image78
    maxoxam41posted 18 months ago

    It is in the interest of our government to desensitize the citizen. It will be part of our norms to be beaten by "the"police. It will be inscribed in our unconscious that brutality towards citizens is lawful. The US is progressively slipping in a militarized country. The police doesn't look like the police, it is not as approachable as it used to be. They are dressed like swap teams, they are armed like soldiers, therefore they behave as such in an lawless environment. If the law was ever applied do you think that a cop could ever get away with murder? No! We accepted it and now it's escalating towards our government's agenda. And, what is it? Combat dissidence? Installing dictatorship? In which type of government the police beats up ad eternum its population without consequences? I have to acknowledge that only in dictatorship, whoever doesn't see it, he's a denier.

    1. PrettyPanther profile image86
      PrettyPantherposted 18 months ago in reply to this

      It seems a certain segment of society is quite accepting of police brutality.  They view it as necessary to keep the peace, as long as it is directed against "them."

      1. maxoxam41 profile image78
        maxoxam41posted 17 months ago in reply to this

        Indeed, it is starting. It is the same people that allowed the government to take away progressively our freedoms. People who repose on government because they terrorized them with former Al-Qaeda.
        Did you know that 500 people were killed this year by the police? Sad US reality...

        1. Quilligrapher profile image90
          Quilligrapherposted 17 months ago in reply to this

          It is truly a sad US reality, Max, even though there is no reliable method of tracking the true number.

          Law-enforcement officials agree that many of the deaths could have been avoided. That is not to say that they were all unjustified. Ronald L. Davis, a former police chief now leading the Justice Department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, remarked recently, “We have to get beyond what is legal and start focusing on what is preventable. Most are preventable,”  he said . {1}

          But focusing on the sheer total number should not obscure the facts that surround each individual event. The Washington Post has started a database to record every fatal police shooting in 2015, a task that also counts every officer killed by gunfire in the line of duty. The Post has been looking exclusively at shootings, not killings by other means, such as stun guns and deaths while in police custody.

          The Post’s analysis reveals nearly 400 people were shot and killed by police nationwide during the first five months of this year. At more than two a day, the average is much larger than the figures reported by the federal government over the last ten years. {2}

          Four out of five (80%) of the victims were armed with a potentially lethal object when shot, consisting mostly of guns but also including an assortment of knives, machetes, revving vehicles and, on one occasion, a nail gun.

          In one out of six deaths, the deceased was unarmed (13%) or carrying a toy (3%). Most notable, the number of unarmed black victims was disproportional to their share of the population in the areas where they lived. About one-quarter of all victims shot by officers were later identified by the police or family members as mentally ill.

          This is truly a sad US reality, Max. Each unfortunate killing must be judged according to the specific and unique facts that apply. One solution, one explanation, one remedy is not going to apply to every case. But, this does not mean nothing can be done to improve this sad and unacceptable reality.
          http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6919429.jpg
          {1} http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/ … story.html
          {2} Ibid

  15. Credence2 profile image87
    Credence2posted 18 months ago

    Here is a thought picture for you, what if the situation had been reversed: A rather beefy black police officer was sitting on the back of a 15 year old blond teenager girl in a polka dot bikini. What would all the 'law and order' advocates say then? Would they have said that the girl was sassing and not following instructions? Would the national discussion have been the same, what would have Fox News said? I can't help but to wonder.

    Looking at the teacher that was fired, the conservatives speak of free speech, but the jobs and professions we choose limit in themselves what we can say and do. How many Anglos actually feel the way this teacher felt, but would not dare say it? The reality is that there are many like her that are teaching our children but harboring a death wish for them, all the same. All of that thinly disguised with the appropriate rhetoric, which for her was too little and too late, this time.  She expressed openly what she felt all along, disdain for black folks and their children. She could have been smart enough to keep her mouth shut recognizing the sensitivity of her position, but no....

  16. aware profile image70
    awareposted 17 months ago

    I think  law   enforcement  trainers  need  to do a better  job at weeding  out  cadets  that  have anger control  issues.  A angry cop is a bad cop.

 
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