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Another Stop By Police Results in Death

  1. rhamson profile image75
    rhamsonposted 16 months ago

    "Officer Ray Tensing fatally shot Samuel Dubose, 43, on Sunday after a struggle at a traffic stop over a missing license tag, Cincinnati police said. Dubose was driving away when Tensing shot him in the head, police said."

    Was the stop racially motivated? Did they both act appropriately during the stop? What is the answer to stopping these senseless killings? The victim was a father of thirteen as was reported. Who will support all those kids?


    http://www.cnn.com/2015/07/21/us/cincin … index.html

    1. Don W profile image84
      Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

      I hate to be so cynical, but I predict that at least one or more people will say, or imply, at least one of the following things in this thread:

      "It was his fault he got shot in the head, he wasn't cooperating".
      "It was his fault he got shot in the head, he tried to escape".
      "It was his fault he got shot in the head, he had a criminal record".
      "It was his fault he got shot in the head, he was on drugs".
      "He generally wasn't a good father/ son/ brother/ husband/ boyfriend".

      "The officer was acting in self-defense".
      "The officer had no choice".
      "The officer was doing his job".
      "The officer is being treated unfairly".
      "The officer is the real victim".
      "The officer doesn't deserve to be prosecuted".
      "The officer is generally a good father/ son/ brother/ husband/ boyfriend".

      etc. etc. It's also so predictable and tragic.

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        It's just as predictable that some of the answers will be:

        "It was a race thing for the cop".
        "The cop needs to be put in jail".
        "Another bad cop.  Seems like that's all we have".

        Don't you agree?

        1. rhamson profile image75
          rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          These things seem to come down to a battle of wills. One wants the other to do something that the other does not want to do. While the stop may have been a profiling exercise and a missing license plate is not a capital offense what makes it get so out of hand?

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            Couldn't tell you.  Did he slap the cop?  Pull a gun on him?  Did the cop get dumped the night before?  Find out he had an STD but his wife doesn't?  One of them probably started it downhill, but which one we will probably never know.

        2. Don W profile image84
          Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          I do agree. So it's good thing officer Tensing and Samuel DuBose are both alive and able to defend themselves against these predictable allegations. Oh wait . . .

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            Can I then assume that it didn't matter WHAT DuBose did, Tensing is not to fire a weapon?  Or even brandish it as it might go off?

            1. Don W profile image84
              Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              I'm merely pointing out that even if Tensing is vilified, called "racist", loses his job, he will still have his life and the opportunity to rebuild it (assuming the death penalty is not invoked if he is found guilty). DuBose will undoubtedly be cast as a drugged-up, good-for-nothing, "gangsta", thug, but will not have the opportunity to answers his critics, nor rebuild his life. There is no comparison between the two situations. While I pity Tensing because of the effect this will have on his life, it is a complete tragedy for DuBose, who lost his life, and whose killing has been described by the County prosecutor as "senseless" and "asinine".

              1. wilderness profile image97
                wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                And so, without knowing what happened or why, the answer is automatically that the cop is a murderer.  I get that - it's what I said would be the answer, after all.

                1. Don W profile image84
                  Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  How about simply not taking someone's life senselessly. Do you think that might be a good idea?

      2. rhamson profile image75
        rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        Taking your position into account, how do you think the policeman should have proceeded knowing that it was just a minor stop for a missing plate? Also when asked to produce a drivers license the victim handed the policeman a bottle of alcohol and then tried to drive off. Please don't tell what he shouldn't have done but what he should have.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          How about letting him drive off and apprehending him at a later time?
          Letting him drive off and using your own car to stop him?
          As soon as you stop the motorist take the car keys away from the driver until you have dealt with whatever?

          1. rhamson profile image75
            rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            All very good suggestions but was he intoxicated? If him driving off in an attempt to allude arrest, how many peoples lives, drivers and pedestrians, could he have put at risk?

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              No suggestion at all that he was intoxicated.

              1. wilderness profile image97
                wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                And the evidence he was not?  Or does that not matter - we should all conclude that anyone handing a bottle of booze rather than the expected license is perfectly sober?

                1. John Holden profile image60
                  John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  No, but the last I heard being drunk wasn't a capital offence.

                  I ask again, why didn't the officer take possession of the car keys as soon as he'd stopped the vehicle?

                2. adagio4639 profile image81
                  adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  "we should all conclude that anyone handing a bottle of booze rather than the expected license is perfectly sober?" - Yes. How does the one thing demonstrate the other?? The bottle was unopened and there is no law to going to the store to buy a bottle of booze. None of this is a justification for lethal force.

              2. wilderness profile image97
                wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                That's twice Rhamson has asked how many lives you would be willing to risk.  Is there a reason the question is ignored?

                1. John Holden profile image60
                  John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  Surely one is too many? oh of course it is the life of a black man!

            2. adagio4639 profile image81
              adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

              " but was he intoxicated?"  We'll never know that now. It's a hypothetical. What if he was a serial killer? We can't justify the killing on "what if's". We need to deal with what we know. What we know is that he was pulled over for a license plate and now he's dead.

              1. John Holden profile image60
                John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                From the video he did not appear to be intoxicated, nor under the influence of drugs.
                He wasn't stopped for the kind of erratic driving that you would associate with drink or drugs-he just didn't have a front licence plate.

                Which would you consider to be the more risky, a car driven by a not or mildly intoxicated driver or a car coming along the street with a dead driver?

              2. rhamson profile image75
                rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                Sure we will know if he was intoxicated. There will assuredly be an autopsy as with any murder. But if you watch the video he is slow to answer and has the questions repeated including why he was stopped several times. But even if he was intoxicated he should not have been murdered for that, a simple DUI.

                Running from the police is never a good idea. It throws suspicion on you and puts many more things into play than if you just cooperate. I watch the reality shows and when the suspect is caught in the process of running he invariably answers the question of why he fled with, "I didn't want to go to jail"

        2. Don W profile image84
          Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          Let's do this together.

          You are a police officer. What is the appropriate response if someone you've stopped for not having a front license plate, drives away from you?

          A. Let them go.
          B. Go back to your vehicle and initiate a pursuit.
          C. Shoot them in the head.

          Hint: the answer is not C.

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            And the question does not have sufficient information to answer properly, either.

            Is the car full of illegal guns?
            Is there drugs involved?
            Has the driving been dangerous to other drivers?
            Is the driver known to the police, or wanted?
            Was the driver drunk?
            Is it a residential street - is pursuit a danger to others?

            But none of that matters, does it?  A youth is dead and should not be; he should have been allowed to do whatever he wished until he could be apprehended without danger.  At least that seems the viewpoint of the hang the cop crowed (unless one of their own loved ones was killed by the youth, anyway).

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              When do you cease to be a youth?
              Surely a long time before you reach the age of 43!

              Or is this a hang over from referring to all black men as "boy"?

            2. Don W profile image84
              Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              So your answer to the question "what is the appropriate response if someone you've stopped for not having a front license plate, drives away from you?" is: shoot them in the head first, then ask questions about what they may or may not have been doing/ carrying.

              I can tell you, that is not the correct answer.

            3. adagio4639 profile image81
              adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

              "A youth is dead and should not be;" - He wasn't a "youth". I believe the man was 42 years old with a large family. He is dead, and the shooting is totally unjustified.

          2. rhamson profile image75
            rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            So it is okay to allow a driver who hands you an open bottle of alcohol to start a pursuit through the streets of the neighborhood? How many other peoples lives are you willing to sacrifice?

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              In the report I read, which I suspect is the same one that you read, the bottle was wrapped..

              1. rhamson profile image75
                rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                I saw the video where he hands the police officer an unwrapped closed bottle of Gin. In many states the Gin would have to be in a bag to be considered un-opened. The news report says it was un-opened. In the time frame where this happened the policeman would have to determine if this guy was under the influence while he was questioning him about his license. As he was doing this with a belligerent suspect he has to take all this into consideration when the guy throws it into gear and takes off. Had the victim just been honest and compliant to the simple requests this all could have been averted. Now we second guess the policeman who is out there trying to do his job for his own safety as well as the victim.

                It is not wise to let someone who is acting such as this guy who MAY have been drinking take off inducing a high speed pursuit. Should the guy be dead as a result?

                The video: http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/police-v … d-32762162

                1. Don W profile image84
                  Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  "Had the victim just been honest and compliant to the simple requests this all could have been averted. "
                  "Now we second guess the policeman who is out there trying to do his job for his own safety as well as the victim."

                  Both comments I predicted on my list at the beginning of this thread:

                  "It was his fault he got shot in the head, he wasn't cooperating".
                  "The officer was doing his job".

                  It's all so predictable it's nauseating.

                  1. wilderness profile image97
                    wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                    You and I should team up: we could make an absolute killing on the stock market.

                    Your prediction was accurate.  Just as accurate as mine was that the cop would be blamed for what happened without regard as to the details or "why's".  Both of us are at 100% - shall we hit the market tomorrow?

                    (By the way, is it your contention that if he had quietly handed over his license and not driven away he would still have been shot?)

                  2. rhamson profile image75
                    rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                    Your assumption of answering my question of what should the cop do given the circumstances of a uncooperative offender of shoot him in the head is way out of line and shows a prejudicial tone towards the conversation. You automatically assume by the results that the measures are condoned. Answering the question is beyond you at this point with the inflammatory and ridiculous conclusions you jump to in this situation.

                    Should the officer allow a suspect to drive away from the stop knowing that he "may" be drunk, can produce no valid drivers license and presumably insurance and flee the scene? Can you answer the question or will we start the litany of accusations and assumptions again?

            2. Don W profile image84
              Don Wposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              Apparently your answer to "What is the appropriate response if someone you've stopped for not having a front license plate, drives away from you?" is: shoot them in the head just in case they are drunk, and just in case that drunkenness injures someone else.

              I can tell you, that is also the incorrect answer.

              And by the way your comment is a variation of "It was his fault he got shot in the head, he was on drugs". I guess I was right to be cynical.

    2. Live to Learn profile image81
      Live to Learnposted 16 months ago in reply to this

      Saw, I think, the city prosecutor in a news conference last night. I watched the video from the officer's camera. It does appear to me that the officer is guilty of murder. I suppose we'll learn more facts as the case proceeds. I am happy that this officer had an on body camera. I think, if we insist they all be issued one and it be operating at all times while they are on duty, we can eventually nip this violence in the butt and see more accountability from the police force when an officer is in the wrong. Conversely, good officers will be protected from false allegations.

      I'm afraid I do believe many police officers are brutes and bullies. Body cameras should allow us to weed them out and hold them accountable for acting outside of the boundaries of our laws.

      1. rhamson profile image75
        rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        I saw the video as well. I don't understand why or when the gun was pulled out of his holster. Could he have used a taser instead? Did he even have one? Is it your contention that the policeman should have let the victim drive off?

        1. Live to Learn profile image81
          Live to Learnposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          The guy was lacking a license. Not a crime punishable by death. So, yes given the two options i do believe he should have been allowed to drive away.

          I'm like you. I didn't quite understand how that happened so quickly. I know the cop claims he was being dragged (no evidence appears available to support that) so it is even more incredible to imagine. Assuming he was right handed, quite the feat with only one hand holding on to a moving car.

          I think we will see a lot of this as body cams spread throughout our police forces. The ones doing the damage are accustomed to giving nonsensical explanations and being automatically exonerated of any wrong doing.

          Edit. In the officer's defense (if there is any) high stress situations can cause people to remember details completely opposite of what really happened. A campus cop could easily be so outside of his comfort zone and out of water to incorrectly remember events without even realizing he is lying.

        2. adagio4639 profile image81
          adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

          "Is it your contention that the policeman should have let the victim drive off?" - I would say yes. The cop was outside of his jurisdiction to begin with. What authority does he have off the campus? He's not a Cincy cop. He's not a State Cop. He's campus security. Absolutely he should let the guy go. What's the alternative?  shoot him?? Over a license plate that isn't even his issue? Sure seems that way.

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            I don't know where you live, but there is a university near me and the security forces there have a shocking amount of authority granted to them concerning infractions on public streets and sidewalks.  You can even be ticketed for being on a public street while smoking tobacco because it's against school rules, and the courts will support the charge right up to pulling your drivers license.

            Before you claim that the cop didn't have the authority to stop for no license plate you might want to check local laws.

      2. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        "Conversely, good officers will be protected from false allegations."

        Sadly, that is untrue.  The mob and the media will always attack the cop regardless of what a video shows.  After all, "Cops protect cops; the video was doctored!".

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          Then invest in a real system that does not allow film to be doctored.

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            Is it digital?  I can be doctored.  And I don't think any system known is small enough to allow a cop to carry, say, 10 hours of film plus camera equipment on their person.

            But it wouldn't matter anyway; the idiots that automatically put a "murderer" tag on every cop that uses a gun won't care any more than they care now.  Their mind is made up without need for facts.

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              Obviously any system can be doctored but only at a much higher level than the cop on the street.
              Are you suggesting that your police are so corrupt that they would routinely doctor footage of their officers in action?

              To suggest that because a few people don't care for the truth no effort should be made to show the truth is a true counsel of despair.

              1. wilderness profile image97
                wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                No, I'm not suggesting that.  It should have been very clear that I'm suggesting that the mob mentality rules in these cases and facts don't matter.  They aren't present, and it won't matter if they are: the cop is always a murderer according to the mob.

                Remember the Zimmerman case in the US?  Where media (a little higher than a cop and with a few more resources) doctored a 911 tape to convince people it was racially motivated?  It not only can be done, it is done.  Just not by the cops.

                1. John Holden profile image60
                  John Holdenposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  So by making the cops film available . . .

                  1. wilderness profile image97
                    wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                    You will produce hundreds/thousands of claims it has been doctored.  No other result (to the mob, not the courts).

                2. adagio4639 profile image81
                  adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  "the cop is always a murderer according to the mob."

                  And the victim is always a "thug" according to Fox News.

                3. adagio4639 profile image81
                  adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

                  "Where media (a little higher than a cop and with a few more resources) doctored a 911 tape to convince people it was racially motivated?  It not only can be done, it is done.  Just not by the cops."

                  I wouldn't go there. George Zimmerman got away with murder. Trayvon Martin was cast as a Thug by Fox News who interviewed Zimmerman in a softball interview by Hannity. If anybody had a right to "stand his ground" it was Trayvon Martin.

                  1. wilderness profile image97
                    wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

                    Why not go there?  Irregardless of who and what Zimmerman or Martin was or did, the tape WAS doctored - just what I said and just what the subject was.

                    And nice that you will publicly claim Zimmerman was a murderer, particularly after a jury of his peers that got first hand experience with all the evidence decided he was not.  It's a major problem today when people make snap decisions without having the faintest idea what happened, which I have said over and over in this thread should you care to read back over it all.  Or, if you review the Zimmerman case you might even figure out that Martin WAS a thug and didn't "stand his ground"; he attacked with no more "provocation" than that he thought he was being followed.

            2. adagio4639 profile image81
              adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

              "the idiots that automatically put a "murderer" tag on every cop that uses a gun won't care any more than they care now. "

              - Interesting answer. Those "idiots are seeing cops committing murder and they call them murderers. Because that's what the cop in South Carolina is. That's what the cops in Staten Island are. The cops that killed Freddie Gray are murderers. And That's what Tensing is. But to suggest that they call every cop a murderer is false. That's like saying that because some blacks riot or loot after one of these incidents, that ALL blacks riot and loot. Do they? Are all cops murderers? The answer to both is no. But what I see is total cynicism taking over, and your statement, "the idiots that automatically put a "murderer" tag on every cop that uses a gun won't care any more than they care now." illustrates that.  Racism isn’t simply using the “n” word. It’s the complete benefit of the doubt toward one group, and the total skepticism toward another.

        2. adagio4639 profile image81
          adagio4639posted 16 months ago in reply to this

          " After all, "Cops protect cops; the video was doctored!"." - They do don't they? We saw video of a cop in South Carolina manipulate the evidence after shooting a man 8 times in the back. The Video of Sandra Bland's arrest was altered. The cops at the scene of the Dubose shooting backed up Tensings account of the event when the video proves they were lying. Tensing was not dragged by Dubose car. Tensing didn't shoot Dubose after the car was moving. Dubose was already dead, and Tensing's video shows him running after the car.

    3. 0
      TheBizWhizposted 16 months ago in reply to this

      Race might have played a part in this, but not in part of the police officer.

      I think this is a problem of people who have no respect for law enforcement period. Not the other way around. If this was systematic killing of people for no apparent reason, then maybe, but in every case, the person shot was fighting or running.

      1. 0
        TheBizWhizposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        Btw, why doesn't anyone think there is an epidemic of police being shot? Is what do they think the cause of this is?

        http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/02/us/memphi … ffic-stop/

        http://www.cnn.com/2015/05/10/us/missis … shot-dead/

        http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015 … /26882511/

      2. rhamson profile image75
        rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        "Race might have played a part in this, but not in part of the police officer."

        I don't know if that is entirely true. I see traffic stops all the time and maybe it is just where I am but more stops seem to be on black drivers than white. Is it a coincidence? Maybe but there are fewer black people in my local area than white people. Is it that the black drivers are worse drivers? Once again I don't know.

        I do agree that if you run from a cop, he will have probable cause to chase you no matter what race you are. Should he shoot you is what is the question.

        1. 0
          TheBizWhizposted 16 months ago in reply to this

          "I see traffic stops all the time and maybe it is just where I am but more stops seem to be on black drivers than white. Is it a coincidence?"

          Are you writing down the numbers? If not, maybe if you have a pre-conceived notion and you only notice black people being pulled over. Maybe you just notice it when it is a black driver pulled over. You have a belief, which is confirmed only when you see a minority pulled over and you reaffirm your belief by thinking to yourself: "Another black man pulled over." and maybe you don't notice when a white driver is pulled over. I don't know what you are thinking and statistics cannot prove it until you tell me. The same goes for the cop.

          Or maybe you are in a predominately black neighborhood. There are many different scenarios. I don't know.

          What I do know is that statistics cannot prove what a person is thinking. When I took my first statistics class, the teacher told us; "Any desired result can come from the use of statistics. If someone wants to get a certain answer, they can skew the numbers anyway they want to get what they want."

          1. rhamson profile image75
            rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

            No I have not written down the numbers. I already stated that it was my neighborhood where I made the observation. Several others in my neighborhood have the same observation. Do you want their names? C'mon man! I must be skewing the numbers to try an convince you otherwise? What numbers did I give you.

            Do we even know if the policeman caught the suspect on campus and followed him off campus and was the stop out of his jurisdiction? That would go a long way towards determining if the officer profiled him and used the lack of a license plate on the front of the car as just an excuse. I have personally been ticketed for the same offence and I am white. It was by a State Trooper who I know had jurisdiction. I broke the law and paid the price. I did not run from it.

            1. wilderness profile image97
              wildernessposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              Hadn't thought about it, but so have I.  Bought a car with nowhere to put a front license so laid it on the dashboard.  Got stopped, too, but not ticketed.  The cop did make it clear I had to get that license on the front somehow, so I did.  Didn't argue with him, didn't do anything but tell him "Thank you", go home and mount the plate.  And he didn't even shoot me!

            2. 0
              TheBizWhizposted 16 months ago in reply to this

              rhamson,
              My point about asking you if you wrote down the number of times was not that I wanted proof from you, but that sometimes our pre-conceived notions can make us notice some things and not another. We also tend to notice negative things more, such as red lights. For instance, sometimes people complain about being stopped by 4 red lights on the way to a destination. They can remember the red lights, but if asked, they probably couldn't remember all of the green lights they made it through.

              As for both of you guys being stopped; I have been stopped many times even though I did nothing wrong. I used to work nights and at that time cops always fish for DUI's. They would usually make something up like "I pulled you over because you touched the yellow line." I also never got shot or even had a gun pulled on me. Was that because I was respectful or because I was white. I guess we will never know, but I would go with the former.

    4. 0
      TheBizWhizposted 16 months ago in reply to this

      Well, here they go again! These crazy policemen shot another black man. I mean, all he did was shoot a gun at them. What racists! (Sarcasm btw)

      http://news.yahoo.com/police-shoot-gunm … 05433.html

      1. 0
        TheBizWhizposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        This poor kid was just minding his own business while breaking into a car lot, jumping on cars, and driving his SUV through the showroom glass and some cops came along and decided to shoot him for no reason. #blacklivesmatter

        (again w/ sarcasm)

  2. 55
    leen12posted 16 months ago

    more cops abusing authority and power as usual this something has to happen soon too many are getting away with it

  3. adagio4639 profile image81
    adagio4639posted 16 months ago

    The cop was a campus cop. Dubose was not driving on campus property. Under what authority did Tensing even have to pull him over? He pulls him over for not having a front plate on his car? That's not even Tensing's business. That's the business of the State Police or Cincy police. So over this crap, he decides to shoot the man in the head? If you saw the video then you saw Tensing shoot before the car moved, and Tensing was NOT dragged by the car. There was a dead man behind the wheel of that car which came to a stop at the end of the block. Tensing is a lying POS, and the other cops filed a false report. I don't know why they are not indicted.

  4. peeples profile image89
    peeplesposted 16 months ago

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/zac … b28f0528cf

    This happened not far from me, 45 minutes away, in a town with almost no traffic at 8pm on a Sunday. Literally if you go to this town on a Sunday night or morning you will likely see only 2 cars per hour on this road.  He had no gun. He did not run. Autopsy shows he was not moving (his car was not fleeing) when he was shot in the back and side by police. The police of course lied and said he was trying to run them over so they shot him. Yet the autopsy proves not only was his car at a standstill, but the police officer was not in front of the car. The boy was inside his car and they were trying to bust him over marijuana.
    I am tired of people saying "if he wouldn't have been selling drugs" or "If she would have just got out her car". It is not the police job to murder people, it is not their job to sentence someone to death, this is not how a person is to be held accountable for their wrong doings. Police brutality is going way too far, and it is time the bad cops be held accountable for murdering people. It is EVERY criminals CONSTITUTIONAL right to a trial, not to be shot down by an over zealous cop. I have known some very good cops. These are not them!

    1. rhamson profile image75
      rhamsonposted 16 months ago in reply to this

      We had a local tragedy where two policemen were killed for responding to a domestic disturbance. When a city cop and county cop arrived at the call a State Trooper arrived as back up. The city cop and county cop knew the suspect from previous encounters. Having a familiarity with the suspect and knew he lived alone they asked the suspect to come out of the residence so they could talk. The suspect told them to go away and that he had a shotgun. Against all common logic they disregarded the danger because they thought they had a good relationship with the suspect. They then approached the door and rapped on it asking the suspect to come out again. The suspect blasted the door and killed the two policemen. The State Trooper who was behind a large tree was unharmed. 

      The bottom line is that you cannot predict what will happen in any given situation nor a relationship of mutual trust can be established in any given situation.

      It sounds as if in the situation you described there was a great deal of inconsistencies as to what the motives of the cops were. But cops are under a great deal of pressure anytime a situation occurs where their lives are in danger. To adjust to it by ignoring the conditions is foolhardy.

      1. peeples profile image89
        peeplesposted 16 months ago in reply to this

        I completely agree with you. However when case after case shows evidence that cops are lying and covering up their murders it is no longer about conditions. If a cop truly feels he or she is in a life threatening situation and has proof to back up their claims there is no reason to make up lies. If a cop can not handle the pressures of their job, they shouldn't be doing it. Being a police officer is not easy, it is not for the easily bothered, and it sure isn't for the trigger happy. Like any job, if they can't handle it they should not be doing it!

 
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