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Why aren't we doing anything about North Korea?

  1. Virginia Matteo profile image90
    Virginia Matteoposted 4 months ago

    I've read recently a book called 'Escape from Camp 14' about a North Korean man who managed to escape from a high-security labour camp and made it to South Korea via China. The book gives a truly chilling insight into life inside the labour camps with torture, starvation and beatings happening on a daily basis. How is it that we don't care more about it? Do you think there is anything we could do to change it?

    1. Live to Learn profile image81
      Live to Learnposted 4 months ago in reply to this

      We don't care about it? I would say that is not entirely accurate.

      I believe we have economic sanctions in place against them. Is it your opinion that the U.S. is supposed to police the world? If so, why?

      We can't force the North Korean government to govern by the same ideals we hold. We cannot force the North Korean people to revolt against an oppressive regime and, quite frankly, if the majority of North Korean people are not clamoring for change who are we to demand it?

      1. Credence2 profile image85
        Credence2posted 4 months ago in reply to this

        I have to agree with your assessment in this situation.

      2. Virginia Matteo profile image90
        Virginia Matteoposted 4 months ago in reply to this

        I'm not talking exactly of "policing" the world, and not only about the U.S. taking action (I think it should be a bigger deal for South Korea, for instance), I'm just wondering why isn't there a more widespread public outcry against the human rights abuses that are taking place in North Korea on a daily basis. North Korea's concentration camps have existed for twice as long as the Soviet Gulag and about twelve times longer than the Nazi concentration camps, and it's still an ongoing issue. Yet, the public seems to be somehow much more insensitive towards the North Korea problem than the labour camps of the past.

        Yes, it's true we cannot force the North Korean people to revolt, but we could help them realise that there are other ways of living. The problem with North Korea is that people there are completely brainwashed and most of them don't know any other reality. It's almost literally Orwell's '1984' coming to life.

        1. Live to Learn profile image81
          Live to Learnposted 4 months ago in reply to this

          Well, I think we tread lightly since China has made it clear it has a vested interest in the area and they are disinclined to allow us to interfere much. South Korea has a strong interest in North Korea but with a 1.1 million strong army in the North, China involved who would, most likely, support North Korea what do you think South Korea can reasonably do?

          Most are aware of the atrocities committed in North Korea. We are powerless to effect change.

          1. Virginia Matteo profile image90
            Virginia Matteoposted 4 months ago in reply to this

            Some people smuggle DVDs into North Korea through the border with China, and it seems to have some effect on the people's mentality with an increased number of escapees. I would rather see more of such grassroots actions oriented at informing the people inside North Korea than any official goverment policies.

            I don't think we are powerless to effect change at all.

            1. Live to Learn profile image81
              Live to Learnposted 4 months ago in reply to this

              Well, I have to ask. Why aren't you smuggling CD's instead of wasting time here?

              1. Virginia Matteo profile image90
                Virginia Matteoposted 4 months ago in reply to this

                Fair point. 'Cause I'm a coward, probably.

  2. 60
    Rajiv pradhanposted 4 months ago

    I think this matter should be dicussion by south korea

 
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