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Is Harry Connick Jr. a Hero or Hypocrite

  1. Friendlyword profile image62
    Friendlywordposted 7 years ago

    Harry Connick Jr. threw a fit when he saw a group portraying the  Jackson Five, performing in BLACKFACE, on a talent show in Australia. Almost immediately, stations around this country began airing a comedy routine he did on Mad TV. He portrayed a black preacher. Some people now think it was hypocritical for him to speak out about the group. I think it was a normal reaction of any American that grew up in this Country. We all grow up, right?

    Watch for yourself and tell what you think.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ynews/20091009/ … news_ts946

    1. livelonger profile image89
      livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Doesn't seem that way to me: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooKaCbMvaZ0
      Looks like he portrayed a fake-and-baked white Southern televangelist.

      1. Friendlyword profile image62
        Friendlywordposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        He had on dark make up.  That is not the same as Mammy Blackface. The Wayans made a movie portraying white people. There is no insult in that.  I think his reaction to what he saw was what you should expect from any American. I say "You go Boy"

  2. Flightkeeper profile image73
    Flightkeeperposted 7 years ago

    From what I can see of the clip, I can understand why Harry was very uncomfortable. I'm sure that the Australians didn't mean anything by it because it's not like they have a history with black people like we do up here. The skit of what I could see of it does look very strange. I'm not sure it succeeded as parody or tribute as they claim.

    Regarding the confusion with the southern preachers. Harry has a deep tan, that's probably why in the MadTV sketch, the Australians thought he was portraying a black southern preacher instead of a white southern preacher. That was funny.

    1. elisabethkcmo profile image74
      elisabethkcmoposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      White Australians do have a long history with the Aboriginal people, who were treated terribly, much like in the US.
      So they should know better.

      http://bovination.com/cbs/australianAbo … istory.jsp

    2. Marisa Wright profile image94
      Marisa Wrightposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      No, they didn't, but I can also see why Americans would be super-sensitive about it.

      The reason for the black face was simple - these were white and Indian people playing the Jackson Five.  They also had a frontman who was playing Michael Jackson with PURE WHITE makeup on. Obviously the joke about MJ's face wouldn't have worked if the backing group hadn't blacked up.  It was as innocent as that.

      1. Friendlyword profile image62
        Friendlywordposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        They were young people and they may not know the history behind Blackface. I just think Harry should not be considered a hypocrite for his reaction to seeing those kids in blackface. He did the right thing.

  3. earnestshub profile image87
    earnestshubposted 7 years ago

    The current Australian labor government is trying to address the situation with our original people. There is a long way to go. smile

    1. elisabethkcmo profile image74
      elisabethkcmoposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      though many don't want to admit it, we still have a long way to go in the US too

  4. Flightkeeper profile image73
    Flightkeeperposted 7 years ago

    I don't know anything at all about Australians and their relationship with the Aborigines so I'm giving them the benefit of the doubt.

    The only movie I've seen was the one that was titled The Rabbit Fence, I think.

    1. elisabethkcmo profile image74
      elisabethkcmoposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      "I'm sure that the Australians didn't mean anything by it because it's not like they have a history with black people like we do up here."
      Just responding to your words

  5. Catherine R profile image60
    Catherine Rposted 7 years ago

    I think he was a bit over sensitive about it.  The fact is that Australian's don't give two hoots for political correctness.  You have only got to look at some of the TV ads we get here - some of them would never get aired in other countries.  But he did explain quite pleasantly what his problem was and the show went on - it wasn't such a major drama.  He appeared as a judge on Australian Idol a few days later.  I think the thing has been blown up a bit.

 
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