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Heroin vs. STDs

  1. drej2522 profile image86
    drej2522posted 7 years ago

    Today, on CNN, I saw an interesting report on a New York governing body (not sure which agency) passing out a pamphlet demonstrating how to inject heroin safely into the body. The governing agency said one of the leading causes of HIV infection is the growth of unsafe, self-induced, drug injections (heroin in particular). They went on to say that although they didn’t support drug usage, if they are going to do it anyway, you might as well help decrease the spread of HIV.

    Of course, the newscasters completely slammed this idea.

    What do you think?

    1. Mitch Rapp profile image60
      Mitch Rappposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      They should teach them not to share needles. Injecting yourself wrong is not the cause of STD's its sharing needles.

      1. drej2522 profile image86
        drej2522posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        It was all-inclusive from what I saw on the program. It's promoting how to use them safely which entails not 'sharing them' (for sharing them would be unsafe).

        1. Mitch Rapp profile image60
          Mitch Rappposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          That's great! I find it very hard to see a junkie caring however.

    2. 0
      lyricsingrayposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Well having been a 24 year, IV Heroin drug user myself, now in recovery, I'll say this.  I have Hep C as a direct result of needle usage.  I now volunteer for the exact organization you speak of called the 'needle exchange.'

      It does make a difference.  No it does not cause increased usage but slowly, very slowly, is making a difference.

      I can't help but wonder if this 'needle exchange' was available back when I was using, would I be dying from Hep C today?

      That's a reality and I fear nothing when it comes to spreading awareness about the disease of addiction and alcoholism.

      Thank you

      Kimberly
      big_smile

      1. drej2522 profile image86
        drej2522posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I'm sorry to hear that Kimberly. Although, I have heard that they have made huge leaps in Hep C treatment...reducing the viral load down to a manageable level. Hopefully they find a cure, lyric!

        As far as the topic goes, that's interesting to find out that it doesn't lead to increase usage. I have to admit, when I first heard of it...I was like, "They are doing WHAT?" But, after you think about it, it's actually looking at a solution from a different approach. How is it working? Do you actually 'see' results?

      2. aguasilver profile image86
        aguasilverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Amen Kim, as to the Hep C, please look up colloidal silver and start making and drinking it, I have seen it clear Hep C in people, but you need to drink a lot of it for a good while to kill the virus.

        I can instruct you off line if you want me to email me from my profile contact.

        Anything that helps someone who is already in a bad situation live with more safety is worth doing.

        We cannot start to judge the person, all you can do is start to try and find a way out of their plight with them.

        John

        1. TheGlassSpider profile image79
          TheGlassSpiderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          AMEN TO THAT!

    3. IntimatEvolution profile image81
      IntimatEvolutionposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I wish they offered free condoms as well.  I'm all for this type of education.  We cannot change the nature of society, however, we can make it safer.

      1. Colebabie profile image61
        Colebabieposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        And I work for a department that does that.

        Needle exchange programs will always be a source of controversy, just as providing condoms will be. It is thought that providing the means creates the want or irresponsibility. After giving out 50,000 condoms last semester, I can tell you that this usually is not the case.

        Once again, education is the most important. hmm

      2. RKHenry profile image81
        RKHenryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I too concur.  Well said as usual.

      3. 0
        Pani Midnyte Odinposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        There are places that offer free condoms. Many school nurses have a basket of condoms people are free to take, sexual education programs normally pass them out, and places like Planned Parenthood always have a few hundred they will give you. The problem is, most teens are too embarrassed to ask an adult for condoms, which is why I think these places that offer free condoms should be more discreet and anonymous.

  2. TheGlassSpider profile image79
    TheGlassSpiderposted 7 years ago

    Well, obviously the ideal situation is that people aren't injecting heroine and getting STDs at all. However, since we don't seem to be doing a very good job of keeping people from doing it, shouldn't they at least know how to do it so that they minimize the potential risks of the behaviors?

    I mean, I guess I'd rather have one problem to deal with than two. I'd rather have a small brush fire than an entire burning forest, you know?

  3. AEvans profile image71
    AEvansposted 7 years ago

    I believe it was a ridiculous idea, they should be getting people off of drugs not showing them how to use it. smile

    1. drej2522 profile image86
      drej2522posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      true...they SHOULD be!!! Whatever they are doing...it's not working! smile

    2. LiamBean profile image88
      LiamBeanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yea! Show them how to overdose instead. Solves two problems; less addicts and fewer infected with HIV.

      1. Hokey profile image61
        Hokeyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You poor man. Somebody really hurt you.....  sad

  4. 0
    lyricsingrayposted 6 years ago

    drej cool thread and I think it warrants being brought back.

    Bottom line that is more than not misunderstood is no one, no one can get people off drugs except the drug addict themselves.  Programs treatment are yes necessary to be available if that addict lives long enough to seek help.

    Only an addict can stop using drugs.  No one or anything else can promote it or arrest it.

    I do know what I am talking about

    Thank you

    1. blondepoet profile image79
      blondepoetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I am 100% behind Kimberley and I speak from experience too. There is no way by teaching the community safer ways of injecting it encourages people to be drug users. We have to look at reality there are so many drug users out there already and they need help.

      1. 0
        mtsi1098posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I agree with lyrics and BP

  5. TheGlassSpider profile image79
    TheGlassSpiderposted 6 years ago

    Seriously folks...We need to start looking into harm reduction models. Obviously the ultimate goal, as already mentioned, is to NOT have people using heroin (or any other drugs for that matter), but in the meantime, since the so-called "War on Drugs" is being SO successful *rolling eyes* we need to look at minimizing other problems that are resulting from things we cannot control.

  6. 0
    lyricsingrayposted 6 years ago

    Spider I couldn't agree more in implementing and enforcing ore and stronger harm reduction elements because bottom line people and addicts will forever be using.  That will never go away. Ever. sad

    1. TheGlassSpider profile image79
      TheGlassSpiderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yeah...I don't really understand the logic behind America's hatred for harm reduction. I don't know how people make the leap from attempting to stop/reduce the spread of STDs to "we're saying it's okay to use drugs."

      Obviously those invested in harm reduction do NOT think it's okay to use drugs, by virtue of the fact that they are attempting to educate people about WHY it's NOT okay to use drugs...they merely recognize that addiction is a serious problem and that, in general, an addict is not going to stop using until they're ready. Period. It's shown over and over and over again that mandated addiction treatment DOES NOT WORK (ETA: for the long term, anyway)...But VOLUNTARY addiction treatment DOES.

      In the meantime, shouldn't people at least get some education about what they're doing to themselves and how, perhaps, to do it a little more safely? Besides, this also gives users a positive experience with a group of people whom I'm SURE can point them in the proper direction should they seek treatment.

  7. Hokey profile image61
    Hokeyposted 6 years ago

    I am with you lyrics. I too have Hep C from 22 years of iv      use. I wish they would have had this kind of information when I was starting to use. I am also in recovery now but the damage is done. People always have and always will use. Education is the key to reducing      abuse and unsafe practices of self administration. I didn't even know what Hep C was until I was told I had it.

    1. Hokey profile image61
      Hokeyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Also re-using needles caused me to contract bacterial endocarditis. Almost killed me.

  8. mega1 profile image78
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    ok, not being funny, but serious - won't most of the junkies have already sold or hocked their tvs so when are they gonna see this video?

    1. mega1 profile image78
      mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I admit, not very knowledgeable about iv drugs - just what I see in movies really - need to be educated.

    2. TheGlassSpider profile image79
      TheGlassSpiderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      While there are plenty of people who fit (or end up fitting) the "junkie" stereotype, don't forget that drug users and abusers come from all walks of life--every ethnicity, every socioeconomic status, every level of education. You might be amazed to see all the different kinds of people who inject drugs and have shared needles. I assure you, plenty of them have access to TVs and computers. smile It's easy not to remember these things though.

      1. blondepoet profile image79
        blondepoetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        That is exactly right they do come from all walks of life, professions. A lot of people have this stereo-type image in their heads of prostitutes, people on the streets, lower class people using drugs.Not true at all.

        1. drej2522 profile image86
          drej2522posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Agreed...In fact, many of them are very intelligent...It's almost scary!

  9. MikeNV profile image76
    MikeNVposted 6 years ago

    AIDS is a bit more than just an STD.

    You have to keep in mind the "innocent" people that can end up suffering - like children, because of irresponsible parents or spouses or partners who are unaware because of their partners addiction.

    I believe we should always do what is in the best interests of the public.

    This is one of those "lesser of 2 evils" society must choose.

  10. IzzyM profile image86
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    There is an outbreak of anthrax in Europe just now, through contaminated heroin which users are injecting.
    The only advice they are being given is to stop injecting.
    Can't see that working!
    In the UK there are needles exchanges but that won't help them with this latest problem.
    If you want to know more I wrote a hub about it.

  11. aguasilver profile image86
    aguasilverposted 6 years ago

    The reality of the situation is that the only way to deal with the problem safely and efficiently will be to decriminalise these drugs and make them available to registered users over the counter, with fresh needles as well.

    This cuts down the criminality and brings the whole issue under control, allowing users to be independent of dealers and the places that attract junkies.

    1. IzzyM profile image86
      IzzyMposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Doesn't work. Methadone ( a DDA drug)is effectively decriminalised.

      The junkies in the UK get methadone which is classed as a heroin substitute.
      They queue up every day at the local chemist for their free dose, or some even get full bottles of it on a doctor's prescription.
      How is substituting one highly addictive drug with another ever going to help them get off drugs?
      Even those that want to end up back on it because there is no support. There is no money to send people into re-hab.
      Oh and all these methadone users are still using heroin when they can afford it.

      1. Hokey profile image61
        Hokeyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        All these methadone users are still using heroin when they can afford it? Are you serious? Where do you get your info? How is it that you know everything? I work in a methadone clinic. I have seen many, many(did I say many?) people get off dope and change their lives through this. I am an addict in recovery and now I help other addicts. That is my job. That is what I do. So don't say ALL these users. Simply not true. Stop generalizing. Not cool and only for closed minded people.

        1. 0
          lyricsingrayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I too got off heroin for 5 years due to methadone maintenance at a very high dose, I had slips but methadone eliminates the effects of opiates.  The hardest drug I ever kicked however was methadone and I'll never forget it.

  12. relache profile image87
    relacheposted 6 years ago

    To the OP, I think you confused the specifics of STDs with the larger issue of blood-borne diseases, as extreme heroin users have their sex drives repressed severely due to their drug use, and blood transmission is the main issue with injection abusers.

  13. drej2522 profile image86
    drej2522posted 6 years ago

    Thanks lyrics for 'opening' this thread back up, so to speak. I believe it is an issue that needs to be addressed.

  14. Hokey profile image61
    Hokeyposted 6 years ago

    In my job I see, lawyers, teachers, factory workers, salesman, writers, as well as poor people and homeless people. Some people would be truly amazed at the different kinds of people that come there. Addiction doesn't discriminate. Period!

  15. darkside profile image79
    darksideposted 6 years ago

    Once the heroin is 'safely' in the vein, what happens then?

  16. 0
    sneakorocksolidposted 6 years ago

    How about don't do drugs and don't have sex outside of marraige? It might actually work!

    1. drej2522 profile image86
      drej2522posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Damnit, sneak, that never crossed my mind! smile

    2. Isabelle22 profile image60
      Isabelle22posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Lol easier said than done.

      1. 0
        sneakorocksolidposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I know, but it's all I got!big_smile

    3. Sab Oh profile image61
      Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "How about don't do drugs and don't have sex outside of marraige? It might actually work!"


      Careful, that kind of talk drives liberals into a bloodthirsty rage.

    4. TheGlassSpider profile image79
      TheGlassSpiderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      How about that's the way we've been doing things for many years already...See where it's gotten us? Maybe it's time to try something different.

 
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