jump to last post 1-23 of 23 discussions (59 posts)

Legalize Euthanasia?

  1. qwark profile image60
    qwarkposted 6 years ago

    Whach'a think and why?
    Was Dr. Jack kevorkian wrongfully imprisoned?

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Absolutely, the man is a gem! smile

    2. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No he wasn't wrongfully imprisoned.
      He had no right to try to play God.

    3. Susana S profile image90
      Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I've not heard of Dr Jack Kevorkian, but i do believe in euthansia if the person chooses it when they are in a position to make the decision. My husband has said to me, don't let me get into a state where I'm shitting myself all the time and don't know what's going on - don't let them them prolong my life. He'd hate that. If he was in this situation I'd probably help him do what he wanted.

    4. lorlie6 profile image84
      lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I haven't followed the Kevorkian situation closely enough to comment, however I have been involved-as a family member or friend-in so many different deaths that I have a very staunch position on this one.
      In certain situations, 'Euthanasia' should be administered.  Believe me.

      1. qwark profile image60
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Lorlie:
        You are a wise and thoughtful being!
        Ty.

        1. lorlie6 profile image84
          lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Thanks, qwark.  Death sux, any way you look at it!

          1. qwark profile image60
            qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Lorlie:
            Lets hope that neither of us has to stare it in the face for many many years.
            A toast to you and I:

                May you live forever,
                  and I never die!
                        "Prost!"

               (Here's mud in your eye...:-))

            1. lorlie6 profile image84
              lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Right back at ya!
              And I don't care much about dying-at 53, I'm pretty much ok with the whole thing-so you can live forever, if you choose. lol

              1. qwark profile image60
                qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Lorlie:
                Thank ya kindly ma lady!...and ditto to you!   :-)

                1. lorlie6 profile image84
                  lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Well, that did it...you've a new follower.  I am a sucker for well-written flattery. :-)

                  1. qwark profile image60
                    qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Lorlie:
                    Welcome aboard!
                    ....and I mean every word!   :-)

  2. 0
    Madame Xposted 6 years ago

    It doesn't need to be legalized. Just use hospice.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      ...and what if the person wants to die with dignity and denies hospice care?

      1. Valerie F profile image59
        Valerie Fposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Who says dying in hospice is without dignity? I think snobs who look down on living out one's days with a terminal illness or disability are the ones who lack real dignity. A person who wears Depends and needs help going to the bathroom is more dignified than any healthy person who looks down on the sick or disabled.

        Quality of life is whatever we make of it, and dignity is simply living honorably.

        1. qwark profile image60
          qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Valerie:
          You didn't answer my question.
          What if the "client" is of sound mind, in terrible pain, has little time to live, denies hospice care and wants to be euthanized?
          You would not be compassionate and use legal euthanasia?
          That would be cruel in my mind.

        2. qwark profile image60
          qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          VAlerie:
          Did you miss the: "...and denies hospice care?" part of my comment?
          Seems so.

  3. Sab Oh profile image59
    Sab Ohposted 6 years ago

    That slope is too slippery

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sab:
      That's only an opinion.
      Why is that your opinion?

      1. qwark profile image60
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        The "Folks" don't like tackling the "hard" ones...

      2. Sab Oh profile image59
        Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Leaving aside the basic philosophical shift from extending life to ending life, you can't imagine the possibilities for abuse, error, and foul play in a system where such practices are allowed? Try hard, I bet you can.

  4. goldenpath profile image80
    goldenpathposted 6 years ago

    I'd never support this practice.  It's easy to say that one would evaluate on a case by case situation but this is not possible or practical.  There are too many candidates and there would be too many people with such "deciding" power in which no two would agree.  In a short time it would prove a judicial nightmare.  From a governing standpoint a society would need to come out, outright, and legislate for a blanket policy for the practice for patients of set conditions or against it altogether. 

    I would be against it as I feel it is not in the right of the people to take, or assist thereof, a life from mortality except in conditions of capital punishment.  We live in an age of epidemic "compromises" where we constantly justify our actions and the actions of society without any acknowledgement of right and wrong.  This practice, in my own opinion, would classify as wrong - but, again, that's just my opinion.

  5. Ohma profile image79
    Ohmaposted 6 years ago

    I think that just because a persons body is failing does not mean their mind is. If a person is of sound mind this choice should be theirs. Probably not the politicaly corect answer but you asked for an opinion.
    Just on a side note The American Indian Elders would when they felt they had outlived their time leave the tribe of their own accord to die peacfully and undisturbed.

    1. Dame Scribe profile image61
      Dame Scribeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I don't think it's just ONE group of people specifically that practiced this either hmm anybody can go off and die in peace if they REALLY wanted to with nobody to stop them.

    2. Valerie F profile image59
      Valerie Fposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      There is a difference between going off to die naturally on your own and killing yourself or having someone kill you.

  6. earnestshub profile image87
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    I have seen death both ways, I know which is best in my view. Some people need assistance to die, and it should be there when needed.

  7. 0
    Madame Xposted 6 years ago

    Well, I guess that's part of the problem as many see it - those who think they "know best". I don't mean any criticism earnestshub, I just see the enormous opportunity for abuse.

  8. kerryg profile image87
    kerrygposted 6 years ago

    I support legalizing euthanasia pretty strongly, but obviously there need to be precautions of some sort to prevent abuse as much as possible.

    I just find it disgusting that we allow our pets to die more comfortably and peacefully than we allow ourselves to go. I held two beloved animals as they died and it was literally like they just went to sleep. Like many other people, I have a horror of dying in pain, and if it came down to a future of prolonged pain until my body finally manages to expire on its own or a peaceful suicide, I know which I'll choose.

    1. tony0724 profile image61
      tony0724posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      kerry it may shock you but I actually agree with you on this one. Why should a person go through needless suffering if we have the means to allow them a peaceful transition to the next plane of existence ?

  9. 0
    sneakorocksolidposted 6 years ago

    Maybe, if it's controlled by a proper medical authority.

  10. kirstenblog profile image76
    kirstenblogposted 6 years ago

    Here in the UK there have been a number of stories on this topic. There is a clinic in one of the european countries (cannot remember which just now) where they do practice assisted suicide. The legal problem here is when someone has deteriorated to a point where their suffering is so great they want to take this option its not easy to actually board a plane and fly there to be given a peaceful passing into the next world their loved ones may face charges for assisting them if they help the person get on that plane. It is very sad in my opinion that so many people are willing to take the fight to court during the remaining good part of their lives so that a loved one will be protected from prosecution when the inevitable happens.

  11. Susana S profile image90
    Susana Sposted 6 years ago

    Hi kirsten, yeh I think it's in Switzerland - the clinic is called Dignitas. It's good that these people have challenged the courts on this issue (I'm thinking of the lady with MS, can't rememberher name though), and can only thank them for their sacrifice in doing so. But it is sad that they have to use their time doing it, when they have such little time left.

    I don't think anyone has yet actually be imprisoned for taking their relative to Swtitzerland? But as the law stands, you're right, they could be. I think our assisted suicide/euthanasia laws (in UK) are getting a bit of a shake up at the moment which is a good thing.

    1. kirstenblog profile image76
      kirstenblogposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      There was a story about a mother who was acquitted recently of murder for helping her daughter commit suicide. What caught me was the mother saying her daughter said 'mom I am to broken for anyone to fix me anymore' she could barely move without breaking a bone. I was glad to see this mom acquitted but wow how hard must all of that have been for her and her daughter hmm

      1. Susana S profile image90
        Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I'd forgotten about that one, but now you mention it I remember that she had to go to court etc. Really tough and heart wrenching stuff.

        I actually believe it a very loving act. Assisted suicide can simply be placing some pills within arms reach and a cup of water. I'd hope my husband would do that for me if I asked him to.

        (EDIT: He may do it without me asking, but that's another story, lol)

      2. qwark profile image60
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Kirsten:
        I agree!
        If that was your adult child and you knew her situation and had done your homework, realized she had fought the good fight but was going to continue to suffer the rest of her life and she asked to be euthanized, would you express your love for her and do as she wished?
        I would and it would rip my heart to shreds!

        Which would hurt the most, letting her continue on in terrible pain and agony for the remainder of her life, or fullfilling her desire?
        Tough decision!

  12. alexandriaruthk profile image55
    alexandriaruthkposted 6 years ago

    I think the person and his relatives should decide for it, if everybody agrees then that is fine,
    I am for legalizing it because I have seen many people suffer and then just waiting for their last breathe assisted with machines.

    1. Valerie F profile image59
      Valerie Fposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      If euthanasia is legalized, the people who stand the greatest chance of cashing in on life insurance or an inheritance, and have the greatest chance of saving money on medical bills should be  the ones to butt out the most.

      Pressure to commit suicide in these cases comes from society, yes, but mostly from what passes for family.

      Also there are cases when the patient has put no wishes into writing, and all we have is the word of one relative against that of the others.

    2. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Alex:
      That was a compassionate response. Ty.

  13. AdeleCosgroveBray profile image89
    AdeleCosgroveBrayposted 6 years ago

    Assisted death is something which I feel is humane, dignified and infinitely kinder than enforcing a prolonged and inevitable death onto someone with terminal illness.

    People seeking assisted death are not trying to commit suicide - they are dying already.  All they are asking for is freedom of choice, as I have explained in my Hub on this topic.

    There aren't enough hospices for terminally ill people (to respond to a comment earlier in this thread.)  Many people cannot afford sufficient medical help to ensure a pain-free and dignified decline.  Others can afford such treatment yet do not wish to prolong the inevitable for their own reasons.

    1. Valerie F profile image59
      Valerie Fposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Well then the obvious solution is to make hospice care more available. Setting up euthanasia clinics instead seems rather lazy.

    2. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Adele:
      Ty.
      A sensitive and well expressed comment.
      I agree!

  14. Mikel G Roberts profile image88
    Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years ago

    I think it is your life, you should be able to decide.
    We all have to die, why can't we choose how or when?

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Mikel:
      Ty!
      The "situation" should be sensitively and professionally decided.
      Euthanasia should be used only if imminent death is a reality and the "client" makes the decision.

  15. 0
    StormRyderposted 6 years ago

    I wasn't aware the youth in asia were illegal, must make parenting tough! tongue
    Sorry, couldn't resist.

  16. Mamelody profile image60
    Mamelodyposted 6 years ago

    Its still murder.. might as well legalize all the killings that happen everyday..

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Mame:
      Legal Euthanasia would NOT be murder!
      Murder in the USA is defined as the crime of unlawfully killing a person especially with malice aforthought.
      How can you in any stretch of the imagination make legal euthanasia out to be "murder?"

  17. IntimatEvolution profile image82
    IntimatEvolutionposted 6 years ago

    I support it, and I think he was wronged.

    A person has the right to do what they wish with their life- that includes living it or dying. 

    People have a right to die with dignity. Who are we to deny a tax paying citizen any of those rights?  We are nobody, and so their rights should not be denied.

    I am one who does not appreciate any government entity telling me, what I can or cannot do with my own body.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Intimat:
      See, there is something we agree on.
      Ty.

      1. IntimatEvolution profile image82
        IntimatEvolutionposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I guess there is.  How about that Qwark?  Rock on.

  18. 0
    Will Bensonposted 6 years ago

    Ending or not ending suffering through euthanasia is a moral decision. Should someone's moral beliefs be justification to outlaw someone else's moral beliefs? Who is moral enough to tell others their beliefs are in error?

    Governments never had a right to outlaw euthanasia or physician assisted suicide in the first place.

    My thoughts - respectfully.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Will:
      I applaud you!
      The decision to end my life should be mine.
      I'm not thinking in terms of "morality."
      It should be a "right!"
      I think Kevorkian was unjustly imprisoned. He did not physically assist anyone. All he did was supply the information, the prescribed medications and the mechanics to "assist" a human being in ending his life.
      What's wrong with that? There was no "pressure" applied in any form.
      A human being who wanted to end it, sought his advice and help as a physician.
      I am for legalized euthanasia!

  19. 0
    sneakorocksolidposted 6 years ago

    Could you recomend your neighbor or your boss?big_smile

  20. 0
    Will Bensonposted 6 years ago

    qwark -  I do remember that Kevorkian "assisted" and did not personally euthanize anyone. Jail time seems a bit much for helping someone die with dignity.

    A friend of my dad's had cancer and was in terrible pain. His wife found him in the back yard with his deer rifle...I won't describe the scene.

    Too bad he couldn't have died with dignity.

    Excellent thread.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks Will!!!

  21. 0
    sneakorocksolidposted 6 years ago

    Maybe we could all put a buttsheads name in a hat the butthead with the most votes gets nominated for a mercy killing to benefit the rest of us!big_smile

  22. 0
    cosetteposted 6 years ago

    don't hospitals already sort of do that anyway? they turn off machines that keep people breathing and whatnot...

  23. defenestratethis profile image59
    defenestratethisposted 6 years ago

    I absolutely support euthanasia. In my old occupation I witnessed a lot of suffering by people with various chronic/terminal illnesses, many of them in vegatative states and hooked up to tube feedings. Multiple complications arise such as decubitus ulcers prone to infection, recurrant pneumonia, intense pain from muscle contraction/spasms, chronic bladder infections....and on and on, plus the additional pain of whatever they were diagnosed with in the first place...brain cancer, anyone? Yes, it should be regulated and approached with great care, but in all my experience, I found that it was the dying not the death ("peace at last!")that inflicted profound discomfort. I think its because the body naturally resists the inevitable, and it takes awhile for most bodies to give up the fight.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Defenest:
      Experience is the best teacher.
      Your response is an educated one, which I profoundly respect!
      Ty.!!!

 
working