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Worker ID law is on its way.

  1. Tom Cornett profile image54
    Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago

    Under the potentially controversial plan still taking shape in the Senate, all legal U.S. workers, including citizens and immigrants, would be issued an ID card with embedded information, such as fingerprints, to tie the card to the worker.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 … 66854.html

    This can't be a good thing.  What can be used for us can also be used against us.

    1. SimeyC profile image90
      SimeyCposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      They already have this information - so storing it on an ID card makes no difference. Throughout your life you've provided this information to the government already - passports, drivers license, tax returns, SSN application, marriage license etc etc....you'd be surprised how much they already know about you.

      I note that as a legal immigrant I have a green card - on the green card is a picture of me, my finger print, and probably all the information I already provided on the immigration application...

      1. Tom Cornett profile image54
        Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        They don't have my fingerprints, or any other biometric information.

      2. livewithrichard profile image85
        livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        But I'll bet your green card cannot be read remotely. This is the problem, not that the Govt has the info. I'm a veteran and they have all my info but its not in a place that can be easily hacked and stolen for criminal use.

        1. SimeyC profile image90
          SimeyCposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          It's on a computer somewhere...it's all digitized thefore has been uploaded to a computer...

          1. livewithrichard profile image85
            livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            I'll agree to that but the cards themselves will be enabled to deliver information remotely. That means the information on those cards will be with you at all times unlike the info that is stored on a secure encrypted network.  Stealing your identity, credit, medical records, biometrics, and whatever else they intend on storing on those cards, will be easier than ever.

            I don't buy into the paranoid conspiratorial nonsense that others on here like to spread but this tops the cake of privacy issues being introduced by our so called leaders.

  2. Ohma profile image79
    Ohmaposted 7 years ago

    Jeez why don't the just embed a micro chip like they do for dogs and cats.

    1. CMHypno profile image89
      CMHypnoposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      That's what will be coming next!

  3. profile image0
    ralwusposted 7 years ago

    I guess we can blame it all on 9/11, Osama is winning

    1. Tom Cornett profile image54
      Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Perfectly said Charlie.

  4. Ohma profile image79
    Ohmaposted 7 years ago

    Maybe so but our government has always been just a little screwed up on the topic of personal freedom.

    1. CMHypno profile image89
      CMHypnoposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Not just the US government - the UK government is trying to introduce ID cards here.  They are only just getting the message that nobody wants them, they can't afford to implement the scheme, and that the id cards can and have already been counterfeited!

      1. Tom Cornett profile image54
        Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I have a feeling that this is just a way to get our fingerprints, vein scans, retinal scans, etc....once they have that...they won't need a card...just ID by the hand or head.

  5. Disturbia profile image62
    Disturbiaposted 7 years ago

    Well we already carry a social security card, a driver's license, passport, many new credit cards have photos or finger prints, people have photo IDs at work, etc. What's one more card?

    Personally, I draw the line at being tagged in the ear.

    1. Tom Cornett profile image54
      Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You just made the best point....so why have another card?

      1. Disturbia profile image62
        Disturbiaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I guess cause my purse isn't stuffed full enough.

        1. Tom Cornett profile image54
          Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Bigger purse...could be a tax write off.  smile

  6. livewithrichard profile image85
    livewithrichardposted 7 years ago

    I think this is bad for our country and won't stop illegal immigration at all. The thing is, there isn't enough manpower to enforce the laws in place to keep employers from hiring illegals and illegals will still get their hands on stolen or fraudulent id cards.

    I think we're all in for an awakening (not just Americans) on the issue of privacy. The RFID (radio frequency identification) chip is already being placed in new passports which means if you're carrying your passport you can be tracked anywhere at anytime. Adding biometrics to the equation only worsens the case. If you're thinking "I'm not a criminal and have nothing to hide" well that's great but there are criminals out there that will realize that these cards can be read remotely. This means that they could possibly hide a card reader inside a briefcase, walk past you or stand in the middle of a crowd read all the cards and steal everyone's personal identities copy them to new cars and sell them to the illegals.

    1. Tom Cornett profile image54
      Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      The government already knows the cards can be copied. They want our biometric identifications.  Illegal Aliens and terrorism is just the excuse. The more information they have on us...the more control they have.

    2. Disturbia profile image62
      Disturbiaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It's just more government control and more money wasted.

  7. Ohma profile image79
    Ohmaposted 7 years ago

    Has anyone ever noticed how closely our "advances?" in society mimic Science Fiction movies?

    1. Disturbia profile image62
      Disturbiaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, and anybody who doesn't believe that Big Brother is watching, must be in a coma.

      1. livewithrichard profile image85
        livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Watch it, Big Brother just recorded this forum post and I'll bet you get an unexpected bill in the mail today... smile

    2. MikeNV profile image75
      MikeNVposted 7 years ago

      We do NOT need more government.  The laws are already in place to enforce immigration and they are not enforcing the laws.

      This is about the next step with is implanting computer chips into people so they can track their every movement.

      It's not a joke.  Georgia already passed legislation banning the practice should it be enacted.

      http://www.ajc.com/news/georgia-politic … 91174.html

      This law would require yet another Government Agency.  And more costs to the employers to buy the equipment.  Then more costs to Americans to pay fees to maintain their cards.

      This is all part of the New World Order agenda and the desire to eliminate paper currency and get everything on electronic cards so the Government can seize anyone's assets with the push of a button.

      This has nothing to do with illegals.  That's just the smoke screen.

      This is another attack on constitutional rights and freedoms.

      1. Faybe Bay profile image84
        Faybe Bayposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I agree. I have warned my family that this was coming a long time ago when they first started chipping pets. I hate to say run for the hills, but my own cabin beneath a Montana sky with a few chickens and a garden and my cash stuffed in the mattress is starting to look pretty good about now. Maybe, though, I should just move to Georgia, since your state has already taken action.
        I remember reading about a kid who volunteered himself and his whole family to be the first humans implanted with the chip. Never found out how that turned out for them.

        http://www.iahf.com/other/20020516.html

        This isn't the same family that I read about volunteering, but this is one among many. Oops, yes it is. just found the original. They are from Florida, and it was the kid's idea.
        http://www.wired.com/politics/security/ … 2/02/50187

      2. Tom Cornett profile image54
        Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        God bless Georgia!  smile

    3. ForkArtJunkie profile image59
      ForkArtJunkieposted 7 years ago

      We'll probably have the option of a tattoo on our forehead, or an electronic implant in our arm that shocks us when we're misbehaving. Not that big of a deal, I'm sure if the government says it's OK, then it's for the best.

    4. ledefensetech profile image80
      ledefensetechposted 7 years ago

      The solution is simple.  Refuse to get the card.  Much like the fear the IRS engenders, they're using the threat of not being able to get a job without this card to divide us and keep us from banding together.  If there is enough civil disobedience, they'll have to drop the card. 

      If you're an employer, ignore the card.  If you're an employee, refuse to get a card.  One thing I've been wondering about is how this will affect the self-employed.  There really is no reason for the self-employed to get such a card, is there.  So one thing we would probably see should this pass is an increase in the number of self-employed people out there.  Hmm.  That's only one example of the way people can get out of this, I'm sure people will find many more.

    5. Ron Montgomery profile image60
      Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years ago

      Finally! Bipartisanship in the US Senate.

      Seriously, this bill is dead before it hits the floor.

    6. ledefensetech profile image80
      ledefensetechposted 7 years ago

      This time, but much like universal health care, it will continue to rear it's ugly head until we throw the idiots out who continue to propose it.  By the way, Ron, why it bipartisanship so important.  Just because a bad idea has support from both sides of the aisle, that doesn't mean it's a good idea.  Look at the Patriot Act or the resolution that gave Bush a free hand in the War on Terror.  Both of those resolutions had a lot of bipartisan support.

      1. Ron Montgomery profile image60
        Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        The bipartisan coment was tongue-in-cheek.

     
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