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This just proves truth will be revealed!

  1. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 7 years ago

    Hey HUMANS!

    Yes, I said Humans.

    You think your actions don't have consequences.
    You think you can lie and truth will never be known.
    You think you are really that clever??

    Think again.

    Example:
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_wedding_chapel_fugitive

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Who are you talking to? We all just robots!

      1. Cagsil profile image60
        Cagsilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Cute. wink lol

  2. Ohma profile image79
    Ohmaposted 7 years ago

    Pretty scary stuff.
    Living right under the noses of the people that are supposed to protect us and all that.

    1. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It points directly to the lack of effort of those of authority. hmm

      1. Rafini profile image88
        Rafiniposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        hehehe  I like the fact he was caught by signing up for VA benefits!  lol

        1. Cagsil profile image60
          Cagsilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          But, he was not caught by authorities. hmm

          1. Rafini profile image88
            Rafiniposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            I don't know....wouldn't you consider the VA a form of authority?  And, the VA obviously responded to some type of notification otherwise he's still be free.

            1. Cagsil profile image60
              Cagsilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              He was caught by the Grandson. wink

  3. Daniel Carter profile image91
    Daniel Carterposted 7 years ago

    It seems that despite what we think are long periods of time, karma always brings it back around. I think time is irrelevant in a universal sense.

    Intriguing story, cags. Thanks for the link.

    1. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You're welcome Daniel. Awareness of ourselves and our actions are so important. wink smile

  4. Chaotic Chica profile image84
    Chaotic Chicaposted 7 years ago

    People will never cease to amaze me in their stupidity. To feel you wouldn't get caught then say it isn't FAIR that you did? Really? (It seems I've said that word alot today in relation to various hubs and forum discussions-what does THAT say? LOL)

  5. LeanMan profile image80
    LeanManposted 7 years ago

    What is the purpose of prison? I was always led to believe that the purpose was to turn bad people into good and helpful members of society, not just a punishment!

    This guy went to prison for nearly 20 years and then skipped.. He then behaved like a model citizen.. 20 years of prison obviously worked.....

    Lots of mixed up kids make huge mistakes, often sending them to prison makes them worse not better... surely this is a success story for the prison service!!!

    1. Chaotic Chica profile image84
      Chaotic Chicaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I can see your point here.....It does give one something to think about!

    2. Daniel Carter profile image91
      Daniel Carterposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Murdering is not honorable. Skipping a prison sentence is not honorable. As I read the article I got a distinct sense that his issue was not remorse for the murder he committed, it was for being caught, not once, but twice. If he had remorse, he would try to heal the wounds of the family he victimized, and apologize. However, he has no intention of meeting with any family members, because he's mad he got caught. And, he COULDN'T REMEMBER THE NAME OF HIS VICTIM???? Wow. Model citizen, all right. NOT.

      I think that says it all. He's not a reformed ciminal. He sounds more like a sociopath who, once caught, decided he couldn't get caught again, so he faked a "good" life. That's all. No remorse = criminal.

      My opinion, anyway.

  6. Rafini profile image88
    Rafiniposted 7 years ago

    I think the important thing to notice is:  He served his prison sentence.  Sure he skipped out on Parole - how serious of a crime is that?  Then he lived his life as a model citizen.  Does that really deserve punishment?

    Other important factors: he threatened the judge, jury, and courtroom in general.  He doesn't remember the name of the man he murdered (how important is that fact?) He has used more than one alias.  Is he really that trustworthy?

    1. Chaotic Chica profile image84
      Chaotic Chicaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I love how you technically contradicted yourself! smile It proves the complexity of this particular situation.

      1. Aficionada profile image94
        Aficionadaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        She probably did it intentionally to draw attention to the complexity.  She's very intelligent and perceptive.

        I haven't read the article yet, so don't assume anything about my opinion of it.

        1. Rafini profile image88
          Rafiniposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          wow, thanks for the compliment.  I didn't do it on purpose, it just came out that way.  Criticizing both sides, basically.....


          EDIT:  sorry, Aficionada.  My son saw my comment and told me I shouldn't have said that...he said it detracts from your compliment, so I wanted to apologize. smile

  7. Aficionada profile image94
    Aficionadaposted 7 years ago

    I did go to the article and read it.  I was struck by the fact that as a youth he was discharged from the Navy for mental issues.

    Now, at age 79 he still identifies with three different identities?  And the one that committed the murder ("not me") is almost treated like a joke? Someone who receives a birthday card every year?

    Definitely sounds to me more like a sociopath than a reformed criminal.  But at the same time, the punishment (or reformation?) should fit the crime.  Since the current crime is parole violation, the punishment should fit that crime.

    He appropriated for himself a gift that thousands of murderers would love to have - decades of a decent life outside of prison.  But the family whose relative was shot six times (for what reason???) will never receive their loved one back.

    It's definitely complex - a lot of good points on both sides, even though I do tend to lean towards agreement with returning him to prison or finding some other significant solution that gives closure to the family and to society for the heinous act he committed as a youth.

    1. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you everyone. smile

    2. Daniel Carter profile image91
      Daniel Carterposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      The moral of the story being, if he is mentally ill, which is very likely, he is STILL a danger to society, regardless of whether or not anyone believes he "paid" the price of his crime.

      1. Rafini profile image88
        Rafiniposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        But does he belong in prison?  I think he requires mental health treatment and monitoring not more prison time. (unless he's guilty of other crimes...)

  8. SaMcNutt profile image59
    SaMcNuttposted 6 years ago

    Hear, here!

    1. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you SaMcNutt smile wink big_smile

 
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