jump to last post 1-16 of 16 discussions (53 posts)

Obama implores minister to call off Quran burning"

  1. fishskinfreak2008 profile image32
    fishskinfreak2008posted 6 years ago

    Web-site/URL: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_quran_bur … ltcGxvcmU-

    If his recent rhetoric is any indication/of any significance, the chances of this are NIL. As ABC's Terry Moran reports, "...with that THEOLOGICAL BELLIGERENCE, Pastor Jones has led his little flock TO THE BRINK OF A GLOBAL CONFRONTATION". So this will be EXPLOSIVE

    1. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Oh my God.

      Obama is once again trying to summon "angels" without ever mentioning the real Creator of the angels.  And sticking his nose into matters that are none of his business, and AGAIN inciting hatred and violence while accusing others of doing so!
      What an immature, dangerous man sits in the White House!

      1. fishskinfreak2008 profile image32
        fishskinfreak2008posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Obama is not inciting hatred. BURNING THE KORAN IS

        1. 0
          Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Obama incites it practically all the time.
          He tries to lead a "civil rights" movement that's already been resolved.
          He has mocked Christianity and other conservative-minded people from his high position, several times, including when he told children that the decent values their parents had were old worn-out ideas.
          His Administration is suing a sovreign State (Arizona) for protecting itself.
          He's been touting civil rights for imprisoned terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, while ignoring the civil rights of New Yorkers to protest the building of a huge mosque there.
          He advocates for gay "rights", paralleling that to the real former civil rights movement.
          He speaks blasphemies about those false "rights" even from the pulpits of churches.
          He's mocked the very foundation of America in more ways than one.
          So yes he incites hatred AND violence.
          He has no business trying to seduce America into his chaotic mindset.
          He should be in a counselor's office somewhere asking what medication will help him with that.

          And he should be GRATEFUL that most American Christians AREN'T the violent type, instead of scolding and accusing a man who's only threatening to burn a book.

          1. pisean282311 profile image57
            pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Obama sits in white house , this brun quran man knows nothing about how world actually works...is he ready to take responsibility of amercian soldiers who would end up being dead in new violent spree?..there are lot of christians working right now in pakistan in floods...is this pastor ready to take responsibility of those lives?...if this pastor does actually have immense faith of what he is doing is right ,he should go to saudi arabia and burn quran there...if he is doing right thing...god would protect him ..isn't it?...

            1. 0
              Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I don't know what that Pastor is ready to take responsibility for,  because I don't know him!  But I do know that it wouldn't be HIS fault if radicals in another Country commit
              violence.  It wouldn't be his fault if Christians are killed there;  it would be the fault of the people who do those violent things!

              If you want to blame him, you might actually put some thought into it and think about the fact that the IMAM who's building the Mosque in New York is DIRECTLY going against the will of the people of New York and the rest of America in general.  THAT has provoked anger at Muslims.   Just because the IMAM is more famous and in a political position doesn't make him any better than that Pastor.
              And NO he shouldn't go to Saudi Arabia and burn books there!   He has the RIGHT to burn them here in America.

              If you're gonna think that way, maybe the IMAM should go to Saudi Arabia to LIVE instead of provoking controversy in America.

              1. pisean282311 profile image57
                pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I know only one thing brenda that you and me know very little compared with usa army personnel , hillary clinton ,barack obama , united nation chief, Indian home minister and such dignitaries who have access to information which we dont have..If they say that this event can turn out to be dangerous for usa and its campaign worldwide, they are speaking from something which they have access to...coming to imam thing well i have never support that center considering emotions of people and would never to that but in same consideration of emotions i wont support burning of quran either...for me humans comes first , rest later...that is my stand on this...

        2. ngureco profile image85
          ngurecoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          That's very true.

          But now that he has talked about it, he may have put himself in catch 22 situation. The opposing politicians may have to ensure that book goes into fire to see how he handles that situation.

      2. Maddie Ruud profile image82
        Maddie Ruudposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You have said you do not think it is okay to burn the Bible or the American flag.  How do you justify this hypocrisy?

        1. 0
          Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I've said it's wrong to burn the American flag, not that someone doesn't have a legal right to burn it.  But yes, it SHOULD BE illegal to burn it.
          Islam is not an American religion, however; and, matter of fact, MOST of its rhetoric and position is oppositional to not only Christianity, but to American patriotism.    The "Nation of Islam" is an anti-white, unChristian organization (look it up).
          And the Americans who convert to Islam, thereby calling themselves "Muslim Americans" are in a paradox, either because they don't understand what they're getting into, or else because they don't care.


          How do you justify asking me how I justify my opinion, which you call "hypocrisy", Maddie?    That's not the first time you and/or another moderator pointedly tried to label my views in such a manner.

          1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
            Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Look up the definition of hypocrisy.  The connection is clear as a carp.

          2. Cagsil profile image59
            Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Actually, you would be WRONG as to whether or not, the flag of America should be burned. That way of thinking is outdated..you might consider living in the here and now, instead of living in the past, like you do with your religious view. It doesn't work in today's society and one would think that you might evolve a better tolerance and understanding, but that seems to be beyond your ability to think for yourself.
            You use another term "patriotism", which is another outdated concept, presently only used by those who live in the past, so as to create discourse within society. So please...open your eyes for once would ya?
            All religions are a joke to begin with and the fact that you cannot see it, is one of the problems.
            This statement was without knowledge or wisdom. And a complete lack of understanding of what it means to be American to begin with. The Freedom of Religion allows anyone to practice whatever religion they feel like. Personally, it would be best if religion was done away with completely, but since humankind isn't evolved far enough for that to happen, those who don't believe must put up with the garbage of those who do. You have that right to believe what you want, as an American citizen, so back off other people so they can do the same.

            YOU do not have the right to infringe upon their freedom, as they do not have the right to infringe upon your freedom. It makes no difference if you think it is right or wrong. That is irrelevant. Just the fact that you continue to open your mouth, shows you lack understanding.

            Of course your view is hypocrisy, you've learned it from your religion. Or didn't you know your bible is filled with it? If not, you do now.

            1. Shadesbreath profile image89
              Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Sometimes you just entertain the hell out of me, Cags.  big_smile

              1. Cagsil profile image59
                Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I'm glad you're entertained Shades. tongue big_smile

      3. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51L3LZB8RyL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

    2. prettydarkhorse profile image65
      prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Obama made a nice move here. I agree, the moves of the pastor will pose danger to us, the troops and this is not what we are raised to be -- respectful of all people irregardless of their religion.

  2. 0
    SirDentposted 6 years ago

    I have been watching the debates back and forth in the religion fourm.  It certainly is a sad thing to see.  The man does have the right to burn whatever book he wants to burn.  Nobody has denied him that right. 

    In my opinion he should not burn the korans.  We are to love our neighbors as we love ourselves.  The money spent on buying books just to burn should have gone to help the poor or feed the hungry.

    I agree partially with what Obama said in the statement he made. 

    Jesus said, "The poor you will have with you always."

  3. Rose Mari profile image81
    Rose Mariposted 6 years ago

    What GOOD can possibly come out of an act full of HATRED?

  4. Rod Marsden profile image87
    Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago

    The US president is trying to remind people in the USA that there have been Muslims in America since the 1960s. Remember Malcolm X? In any event not all Muslims were responsible for 9/11 and in fact there were Muslims who were working in the Twin Towers and who died there during 9/11.

    1. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ya mean the Malcolm X who was in the "Nation of Islam" and said white people are the devil?  The guy from whom Obama seems to have borrowed a piece to add to the huge chip on his shoulder?
      That's not a good reminder at all, so I'm wondering why did you bring that up like it's a good thing?


      I keep wondering just how much "reparation" does Obama wish to impose upon people who never had anything to do with slavery....

      1. I am DB Cooper profile image67
        I am DB Cooperposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        With that last sentence you've marred every point you've tried to make here.

        1. 0
          Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Only in the minds of ostriches with their heads in the sand.

          1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
            Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Well, at least you're not blaming the carp this time.

        2. Shadesbreath profile image89
          Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          LOL you're just now figuring out how totally out there and out of touch with anything remotely resembling reality Brenda's opinions are?

      2. Rod Marsden profile image87
        Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I was just pointing out that Muslims in the USA are not a recent happening. Sure Malcolm X had a chip on his shoulder. No denying that. Even so there have been home grown Muslims living peaceful lives in the USA since the 1960s. Getting the peaceful ones offside would not be a good idea. Not taking into account that not all Muslims have done harm to the USA would also not be good.

  5. Aficionada profile image92
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    My concern with the President's involvement is that it has given the Florida pastor a great deal of power. 

    Think what will happen among the very few people who admire him, when he stands up to the leader of the free world and tries to pull his terrible stunt.  In addition there may be some sadly naive people who think Jones is standing up bravely for democracy or for free speech, etc., when he is actually standing up for idiocy, insensitivity and recklessness.  He has already demonstrated himself to be callous, self-serving, and dangerous.  I hate that his weakness may be perceived as strength, because of his new ability to say No to the man who holds one of the most powerful positions on earth.

  6. OrlandoC profile image74
    OrlandoCposted 6 years ago

    What amazes me is that so many political conservatives won't admit, or reluctantly admit, that burning the Quran is a dangerous thing. Not to mention disrespectful to a group who's majority had nothing to do with terrorist attacks.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You have a valid point. Kick the butt out of the Muslims who would attack the USA for sure but realize that there are a hell of a lot of Muslims out there and you don't want them all as your enemies.

  7. Aficionada profile image92
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    I have heard a lot of political conservatives condemning the plan. It's possible that they have not used the exact words "burning the Quran is a dangerous thing," but they have definitely said it is a bad thing to do and should not be done.  I thought this was one issue that practically all political viewpoints agreed on.  In fact, I have not heard or read even one person say that it should be done.  Some have said that he has the right to do it (and he does), but that he absolutely should not do it.

  8. 0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    I expect the powers that be to intervene. Even with money.

  9. Ron Montgomery profile image61
    Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago

    The Gainesville fire department has stated that the burning will definitely not take place.

    1. Shadesbreath profile image89
      Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I was really hoping for something like that.  A couple of fire trucks parked in hose range, just turn em on and arc them over the gathering so that the pile would never burn.  I don't think too many Muslims would be offended by the deluged books, given that it was an act of solidarity of the entire U.S. defending their right to freedom of religion and freedom from persecution.  I think it's awesome if they are planning to do that.  Frankly, I was kind of hoping for a big firefighting helicopter to fly over and douche the lot of those racists with a massive water drop from fifty feet up.

      1. 0
        sandra rinckposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Baptism? lol

        1. Shadesbreath profile image89
          Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          U know, I can see some religious whack job somewhere trying to make that metaphor for real out of it and ruin the unity the country might actually be getting out of this.  LOL <sigh>

      2. 0
        Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        So, you're saying "Muslim" is a "race", a Nationality?

        1. 0
          sandra rinckposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          What's wrong with you Brenda?

          1. Cagsil profile image59
            Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Hey Sandra, I think Brenda is asking for clarification. lol

    2. 0
      sandra rinckposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Was that today because yesterday Pastor Jones said he will not change his mind.  Anyways, damage is already done. sad

      1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        No, it wasn't that he changed his mind (although there are now reports that he has), the fire department was going to take action to prevent the fire.  If the fire were to proceed as it has been described, it would have been in violation of local ordinances.

        1. 0
          sandra rinckposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Ahh, very cool.

  10. 0
    sandra rinckposted 6 years ago

    I will sadly sigh along with you. sad *sigh*

  11. BDazzler profile image81
    BDazzlerposted 6 years ago

    Dang, it's a messed up world when I have to agree with Obama:

    "If he's listening, I hope he understands that what he's proposing to do is completely contrary to our values as Americans," Obama said.

  12. 0
    SirDentposted 6 years ago
    1. ngureco profile image85
      ngurecoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Its good to learn that it has been called off but my worry now is that terrorists can take advantage of the situation and go ahead and burn the book.

  13. rebekahELLE profile image90
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    brenda, what exactly is an American religion?? so god now has certain religions exclusively for Americans?

    you are sadly misinformed. I suggest making a friend with a true Muslim. I know quite a few. they are nothing like you and a few others portray here.

  14. myownworld profile image80
    myownworldposted 6 years ago

    I wish people would stop making such generalizations about muslims - and I so wish the moderates would speak up more often!

    The burning of quran is not about just any book - its about insulting another's faith. I would call it an inconsiderate act most of all. But do I - along with countless of my muslim friends - go burning american flags over it, waging wars or even thinking that all americans hold similar views? Of course not! I think this pastor deserves just what all extremist muslims deserve: LESS coverage by the media, and less of sweeping statements about either americans or muslims.

    However, I'm afraid, as always, that the average person in the middle will suffer as a result of the backlash... while the extremist muslims will just get another excuse for being up in arms (yet again!)... and an unneeded excuse to justify terrorism. I fear too for the american soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq. An act of hatred only breeds more hatred. Sad, really... sad

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with much you say here but I cannot separate Muslims from Americans because you do have Americans that have, since the 1960s, been Muslim.

      I definitely agree that toning down the coverage on the pastor would be good for everyone but it isn't likely to happen.

      Americans are still steamed up about the idea of a mosque or a building containing a Muslim prayer center at ground zero in New York. For some Americans the burning of the Koran (not spelling it the French way for love or money!) is venting their anger at the proposal. A pastor, a man of God, however should know better than to stir up hatred. Yes, hatred breeds hatred.

  15. outdoorguy38 profile image61
    outdoorguy38posted 6 years ago

    I understand that this is a delicate issue, but how is burning the Koran any different than the mass of Holy Bibles that have been burned in Muslim nations? Not to mention Christians sought out and killed for their beliefs, at least this pastor is not on a witch hunt to kill those who disagree with his God, unlike the Muslims that have declared Jihad upon the west and all of its inhabitants!

    What is terribly disturbing to me is all the "Americans" in this post that say that religion should be removed from our nation. America was founded upon the belief in freedom and the freedoms that are our God-given right as humans. No one should be forced to believe in the same God, but being forced to recognize what our country was founded on and meant to remain, should be mandatory.

    If the fire department wants to stop the burning by destroying the books with water, that's just fine by me!

    1. Garrett Mickley profile image80
      Garrett Mickleyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "how is burning the Koran any different than the mass of Holy Bibles that have been burned in Muslim nations?"

      Do you remember being a little kid, and someone would insult you, and you would insult them back, but then the teacher or parent would be like "Don't insult them back, be the bigger person, don't stoop to their level" or something like that?  That's how I was raised.  If someone insults you, don't stoop to their level to get even, be the bigger person and move on.

      Well, I kind of see it like that.  Using "they did it to us" as an excuse just makes us as bad as them.

      1. BDazzler profile image81
        BDazzlerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        That is a reason I can get on board with.

  16. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image58
    VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 6 years ago

    My overall assessment of the Quran burning issue is that the US government does nothing to regulate its citizens. There are widespread lawlessness and terrorist fuelling resources in USA.

    1. The destruction of twin towers is a heinous crime which could not and should not be forgotten for all times to come.

    2. The burning of quran by a churchman is totally irrelevant as there was no threat to his religion from others.

    3. The mosque near the twin towers should be removed and US govt. should start rebuilding the towers once again and reestablish its supremacy in international affairs. The site should be taken over by govt. and any construction in and around the place should only be done by the US govt.

    4. If the muslims insist on building the mosque there, a parallel demand should be made... the building of churches in all Arab and Islamic countries. 

    5. Any counter-offensive on any terrorist attack should initiate only from the govt. and not by anyone and everyone.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      All good points venugopal.

      Holy wars we do not need. I was there in New York when the Twin Towers were still under construction. Unfortunately I haven't been back there in recent times. I can understand the feeling of loss and wanting to do something about it.

      Thinking about doing something positive rather than negative would be the way to go.  Thinking about something that celebrates life and the lives that were cut short rather than death would be the best of all things to do.

      It is dead set easy to be negative.

      Certainly no Mosque should ever be built at ground zero.

      A referendum should be put together and New Yorkers should vote to decide what to do when it comes to ground zero. Groups put together a number of options and the people decide. Sounds like democracy in action and democracy can be a positive force.

    2. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with some of that; not all, but some.

      I definitely agree that the government does (basically) nothing to regulate its citizens!  At least those acts that get inserted in between "illegal" and "legal"!   And that's because a major portion of the secular part of America doesn't WANT any regulations; they want a free-for-all, and don't realize that we MUST have government, checks and balances against the temptations that everyone has but that not everyone has the self-control to "check" themselves.
      "Civil rights" activists and groups whine at the drop of a hat, taking advantage of freedom and apparently being totally ungrateful for the wide range of "rights" that we have.

 
working