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'Made in America' Bill

  1. pisean282311 profile image56
    pisean282311posted 6 years ago

    US House of Representatives passed two different bills that mandate the Congress and the Department of Homeland Security to purchase only US-made goods.

    The Congressional Made in America Act, introduced by Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, requires the Congress to buy goods and services made in America for the first time in nearly seven decades.

    Similarly, the Berry Amendment Extension Act, introduced by Congressman Larry Kissell directed the Department of Homeland Security to buy clothing, tents, and other products made in America.

    --------------------------------------------------------------

    first step towards anti globalization?

    1. alternate poet profile image80
      alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      First step toward second rate goods for your gov. and similar trade rules from other countries which will impact the only things you are good at - computers.

      1. pisean282311 profile image56
        pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        hmmm

      2. Jim Hunter profile image61
        Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        "First step toward second rate goods for your gov. and similar trade rules from other countries which will impact the only things you are good at - computers."

        Yeah, that Chinese stuff is way better.

        1. alternate poet profile image80
          alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Quite frankly I haven't seen anything made in America for years, here in China, in the UK or anywhere in Europe for htat matter, except computer bits.

          1. Jim Hunter profile image61
            Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Sorry about your luck.

            But it doesn't matter its all second rate goods anyway.

            1. pisean282311 profile image56
              pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

              lol

            2. alternate poet profile image80
              alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Ah !  correction - I have seen shedloads of weapons made in America, bombs, mines etc.  About all, weapons and computer chips.

    2. SiddSingh profile image60
      SiddSinghposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The Congressmen/women are elected representatives, as such there voices are the voices of American people. Or at least a sizable section of the populace.

      Doesn't this mean that there is a popular opinion against globalization?

      Now, the Congress should at least ask the government to stop preaching about the virtues of "opening up the economy" to the rest of the world. That would be pretty consistent.

      1. Jim Hunter profile image61
        Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        "The Congressmen/women are elected representatives, as such there voices are the voices of American people. Or at least a sizable section of the populace."

        One would think that they would represent us but sometimes they do what they want.

        Actually they do what they want most of the time.

        Thats why so many will be gone soon.

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image91
          Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          "Actually they do what [corporations and well-funded special interests] want most of the time."

          There, fixed it for you. smile

          1. Jim Hunter profile image61
            Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            They could always show some integrity and say no.

            But they don't.

            So in fact they are doing what they want.

          2. Evan G Rogers profile image82
            Evan G Rogersposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Petitioning your government is a constitutionally protected right of the citizenry. (1st amendment)

            Dishing federal tax money out to private companies is a Constitutionally OUTLAWED right of the federal government. (10th amendment).

            ... So now that we've gotten that figured out, it becomes easy to see that the ones at fault are the congressmen, and not the companies.

  2. I am DB Cooper profile image68
    I am DB Cooperposted 6 years ago

    I don't think anti-trade for the sake of being anti-trade is ever a good idea. The government should be buying the goods that are right for the job and at the minimum expense to the taxpayer. You start with a bill like this and you end with the government buying $200 hammers and $500 toilet seats from "good ol' American" companies who happen to make large donations to the politicians who make purchasing decisions.

    1. pisean282311 profile image56
      pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      important point...

    2. Shadesbreath profile image89
      Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with this.  I think that if there are two, lets say tents, that are of equal or similar quality and both will work for the purpose, THEN I'm fine with favoring the American product.  Why not, it only makes sense (unless there is some political gain to made otherwise). 

      I guess the operative phrase is "makes sense."  But, I suppose that's too much to ask from government.

  3. Evan G Rogers profile image82
    Evan G Rogersposted 6 years ago

    Wow, these are horrible bills.

    So, the reason why things are being brought from abroad, is because the other countries can make the darn things cheaper. Same product, less price = good deal.

    So what does it mean that we're forcing our police etc to buy american? An unnecessary waste of our tax dollars; less protection for more cost.

    This is clearly nothing more than an idiotic attempt by some politicians to get re-elected.

  4. Ben Evans profile image75
    Ben Evansposted 6 years ago

    The government has basically for the most part bought US manufactured goods in the past.  I have worked with the GSA and other agencies and they have bought US made vehicles and US manufactured goods as long as I can remember.  If it was made in the US, it was bought by the government and if it wasn't that was the only time they would source it somewhere else.  This has been a mandate for the US government so I believe this is feel good legislation. 

    This is not an argument for or against.  I just don't know how this bill will change things.

  5. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    First step to blowing the budget.

    1. pisean282311 profile image56
      pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      lol

  6. livewithrichard profile image84
    livewithrichardposted 6 years ago

    These are just small amendments to the Buy American Act of 1933 and a feel good election year ploy which will have no effect on trade agreements made by the US: General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), US- Israel Free Trade Agreement, the US- Canada Free Trade Agreement, World Trade Organization (WTO), the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA), or the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

    1. Ben Evans profile image75
      Ben Evansposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with you.  I think you are the only other one here who understands that this law will have absolutely no bearing on how the US purchases..........The law is already in effect for many years.

      I have had and bid government contracts and there have always been made in the US content from bolts up through major components.  For a person to bid a government job and to use a non-US produced component, they have to submit a major exception and fill out umpteen sheets of forms.  They will also most of the time lose the bid.

      1. alternate poet profile image80
        alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        It is nice to know that at the heart of the whole 'free trade' rhetoric, that the US tries to bully the rest of the world with, the reality is isolationist thinking and monopoly.

        1. livewithrichard profile image84
          livewithrichardposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I think all countries have to think local first and global second. Come off your high horse because your country manipulates global markets more than any other country by purposely keeping its currency low and its products cheap and many of its own markets off limits to foreign competition.

          At the height of this economic recession China made its own "Buy Chinese" decree even though it already dominated huge trade deficits with all of its trade partners.

          1. alternate poet profile image80
            alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            As far as i am aware China has never 'manipulated' world trade forcibly in the name of a 'free trade' that patently was about trying to dominate world markets with American goods by the US. 

            I am only a guest in China and reporting what I see and learn, but it is already clear they don't buy into the hypocrisy that the US indulges in, free tradae, freedom generally, human rights, all just a cover for forcing US goods and services into other markets with advantageous terms.

            I don't see China spouting off about exchange rate manipulation by the US that has been described by respected western economists as the biggest con trick in economic history.  I do see them honestly declaring what they will do and then doing it, such as the relaxation of its currency by tying it to a range of currencies that show some stability, I don't recall them linking to the dollar ?

            Every country has run buy your own stuff campaigns, why should China be any different - or do you think it should lay back and let over-priced US goods in with the advantages that the US insist is given to them?  Isn't it enough that they are bailing you out of your own economic quagmire ?

            1. livewithrichard profile image84
              livewithrichardposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              "As far as i am aware China has never 'manipulated' world trade forcibly in the name of a 'free trade' that patently was about trying to dominate world markets with American goods by the US."

              No, China's manipulation is subtle. Their economy must continue to grow and the only way that can happen is with its exports. If their exports are cheaper than everyone else and they keep markets closed to foreign competition they can maintain a huge trade surplus. With the huge trade surplus and purposely keeping their currency pegged at 14% - 40% below other major world currencies they can manipulate those currencies by purchasing their debt. This artificially raises those currencies keeping them higher than China's currency guaranteeing their cheap exports.

              "Every country has run buy your own stuff campaigns, why should China be any different - or do you think it should lay back and let over-priced US goods in with the advantages that the US insist is given to them?  Isn't it enough that they are bailing you out of your own economic quagmire ?"

              And those campaigns are good for morale and for election year politics.  Should China let "over-priced US goods in...?" Yes, that's what trade partners do. They let the market determine whether a deal is a deal. 

              China is not bailing the US out of anything, their purchase of our treasury bonds is self serving.  What do you suppose would happen to the Chinese economy if the US dollar fell to equal the yuan? The US, with a population one quarter the size of China's is still the world's largest importer of goods and since we are all globally connected China's economy would collapse along with most of the rest of the world's economies.

        2. Ben Evans profile image75
          Ben Evansposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I know there are many things that the US has done bad and good.  I also know that it there sentiment towards US policy that is not good.  I am not defending or saying whether this policy is right or wrong.

          I am just stating that this has always been US policy.  This news is just bubble gum for the brain.

  7. earnestshub profile image89
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    Almost a Trillion USD debt (US bonds) is being held by China yet their currency just went up.

    China is hardly able to bail America out while artificially increasing it's currency's worth against the USD now is it? smile

    1. alternate poet profile image80
      alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I'm afraid they can, at the last count they had in excess of 3.5 trillion dollars out in the world to spend and do with, that would be about 3 times the  worth of Oz as a package deal wouldn't it ?  not counting the beer of course big_smile

      1. earnestshub profile image89
        earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I reckon you may be right about the size of our economy! Lot's of Chinese neighbours where I live! The economy is strong here thanks to China! lol

        The point I was trying to make and probably didn't, is that it is China who are holding the American debt, and yet they have been decent enough not to keep their currency bolted down when it started to rise against the dollar.

        China can also control it's growth and inflation without triggering huge hikes in interest rates. A feat the Australian treasury is not yet able to perform.

        I know a little about China, as I have a Chinese son. smile

        I see today Japan is threatening to print money as their way out of financial trouble. That would probably start a currency war. Not a good idea!

        1. alternate poet profile image80
          alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Cool - I hope to make a new one of those in about eighteen months, assuming the missus doesn't cost too much to marry ! big_smile

        2. alternate poet profile image80
          alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Ahhhhhhhhhhhh !!!   That is why they have suddenly decided to rough up a Chinese trawler near the Chinese 'fishing island' that Japan disputes, mainly it would appear because it is closer to Japan than to China big_smile

          That and the Japanese buying shedloads of the US debt from China so that China wasn't the biggest holder, a PR embarassment for the US I guess.  AND Japan suddently getting involved with Taiwan out of the blue.  More US wheeling and dealing and trouble making after their 'excercises' off the coast of N Korea, that is also off the coast of China by the way !!

          All clear now - thanks Earnest !

          1. earnestshub profile image89
            earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks for bolting that together for me alternate poet, I had missed some of that news and not made the connections.

  8. lovemychris profile image81
    lovemychrisposted 6 years ago

    Love Marcy Kaptur!! There's one lady who gets it.
    We have been sold out.

    By the same people who always sell the patriotic line of malarkey.
    And the doof-balls who buy it.

  9. Lisa HW profile image81
    Lisa HWposted 6 years ago

    Separate from any "political leanings" or "attachment" to one country or another (honest), as an American consumer, I would like to see a return to more American products being available.   I'm not the only one who has become increasingly unhappy at not being able to find the quality of products that once were easy to find (especially with a lot of "day-to-day" products).  I mean, you buy a set of colored mugs because you think they're cheerful and "happy" (and they're cheap).  (Made in China)  Someone puts them in the microwave and all the "paint" cracks off.  You buy a made-in-China broom, and the handle falls off.  lol   Yes, that stuff is cheaper; but I'd rather pay a little more for a broom that will last (or mugs that aren't going have paint chips "happen".   I once ordered a cheap USB phone online.  It looked fine in the picture (made in China).  The thing looks and feels like it came out of bubble-gum machine.  I haven't been able to find a made-in-USA brand of comb I always used.  All I can find is made-in-China.  They all make cuts in my scalp.  Then we had the made-in-China toy thing a few years ago.

    I live in a US suburb where those day-to-day products are sold in places in like WalMart, CVS, RiteAid, etc.  There's no mall nearby, and no small stores (except for a few that sell stuff for - like - a dollar or two, all made in China).  I don't have anything against China or products made there (if they didn't fall apart), but my preference for US made products; and my wish to see more of them available again, has nothing to do with all "blah blah" about "bullying" or "forced trade" or any of that.  It has to do with wanting to be able to find a broom that doesn't fall apart, a comb that doesn't make scabs in my head, and cups that can stand up in the microwave.

    In view of the US economy right now, and in view of the fact that if you buy cheap stuff that you have to buy six times, instead of once, I think it's a good idea right now to aim for US-made stuff (at least in a lot of instances).  If there's some product made in another country that higher in quality than the same one made in the US, then that's different.  For a whole lot of things, though, stuff made in China (or some other countries) aren't higher quality.

    A lot of people I know just automatically bought made-in-China stuff as it started showing up in the US.  Now, a lot of people have seen the quality "issues" and have started to look to make sure stuff isn't made in China.  They do now what they used to do when I was a kid, and my father made a rule, "Don't buy any toys made in Japan."  The fact was, those toys were low quality back then.  Then, when Japan started producing decent quality stuff, everyone started buying it.  It has nothing to do with political stuff for a lot of people.  For those who lean toward that kind of "political thinking", sometimes people refuse to just acknowledge the reality of who makes decent quality stuff and who doesn't.   Sometimes things are just what they are.  It doesn't have to always be about animosity or other ugly things.

    1. alternate poet profile image80
      alternate poetposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You are looking in the wrong direction I am afraid.  Living here I find everything is sound and good quality, unless you go to the cheap garbage store and then you get cheap garbage stuff.  You should look to your own citizens who are so greedy that they spend a few cents less and buy the garbage instead of the good stuff that is still amazingly cheap.  Even the little old granny round the corner here (who talks to herself all the time) knows this simple fact of life.  Don't worry, you guys will catch on soon.  Your monopolistic masters who have wiped out the little shops are screwing you bigtime.  But I guess you will all rush out to vote in another billionaire and then whine that he aint looking after your interests ?

  10. profile image60
    roseamondposted 6 years ago

    the usa survived the made in japan junk after ww2. we will survive the made in china jund also.

 
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