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Two Phrases that Need to be Stricken from the English Vocabulary

  1. tritrain profile image75
    tritrainposted 6 years ago

    This decade seems to have welcomed in two phrases that I hate.

    "That being said", bla bla bla
    "That said", bla bla bla

    There's an assortment of other wonderful terms that one could use, such as "however", "but", etc.

    1. dutchman1951 profile image59
      dutchman1951posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      how about the word "Like"...!

  2. Evan G Rogers profile image78
    Evan G Rogersposted 6 years ago

    you make a very weak argument. - The cost does not outweigh the gain.

    1. tritrain profile image75
      tritrainposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Indeed, the gain.

  3. Pearldiver profile image87
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    You are a Squirrel.... You won't live long enough to see the language change! hmm
    Why are you even making such irrelevant remarks? hmm
    Best you Get your head outa your Nuts mate! roll smile

    1. tritrain profile image75
      tritrainposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Good point.  As a squirrel, I have more pressing issues this time of year.

      1. profile image0
        Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, you have to collect a lot of nuts, so your children won't starve in winter! big_smile

      2. Pearldiver profile image87
        Pearldiverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        And That Being Said..... See Ya in the Spring smile

  4. ddsurfsca profile image67
    ddsurfscaposted 6 years ago

    I think a far better choice if we were to strike a phrase from the English language would be---
    "you know what I mean"  or
    "like"

    Example--The money was "like" stolen, "You know what I mean?"

    they add nothing to the meaning of what was said, that the money was stolen.

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      How about words like f*** you!(?)

  5. couturepopcafe profile image60
    couturepopcafeposted 6 years ago

    No offense intended but the words but and however don't have the same meaning as the phrase having said thatBut and however are often used as connectors.  They attach two separate phrases or thoughts. You could use except that in place of butHowever means nevertheless or althoughHaving said that indicates a completed action.

    "Having said that, ain't language grand?" 
    "Yes, but I still hate the phrase.  However, I'm willing to learn."
    "Great, except that I don't have time to teach you.  Nevertheless (however), I will try."  cool

    I don't know if using two connectors in one sentence is grammatically correct.  hmm

  6. kazemaru2 profile image57
    kazemaru2posted 6 years ago

    like and what because they are verbal fillers that are more detrimental to grammar than text. Particularly in teens this seems to be a problem. These words maybe shouldn't be omitted but teachers should spend time clarifying like isn't a verbal filler it is to compare 2 similar subjects.

 
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