jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (51 posts)

Do You Think America is Democratic country?

  1. profile image0
    rakubaposted 6 years ago

    Why do you think so?

    1. Petra Vlah profile image60
      Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      It all depends what you mean by democratic. America gives the impression of democracy, but it is just an illusive "democracy" at best.

    2. qwark profile image59
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      ...we are a "republic."
      We are not a "democracy."
      "I pledge allegiance...and to the republic for which it stands."
      There is a great deal of difference between a "republic" and a democracy."
      Study.

      1. Reality Bytes profile image93
        Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You are correct, but the Country is being fundamentally changed!

        It starts by teaching democracy in the schools and not explaining the truth of the Republic.

        1. qwark profile image59
          qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Reality:
          We do give lip service to being a democracy.
          I school, when I was young, I was told we are a democracy, yet we stood and mouthed the "Pledge of Allegiance" which clearly announces that we are a republic! WE were young and dumb...you know how that goes...lol
          Most folks don't know the difference 'twixt the 2. I end up explaining that difference because even after reading their definitions, most still do not understand...arghhh..
          WE will never become a democracy...no chance!

    3. Christopher Floyd profile image60
      Christopher Floydposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The United States of America is a democratic republic, both by definition and in practice. I think so because my country was founded with this in mind; democracies degrade into mob rule and republics become monarchies. That's why the U.S. was and is such a novel experiment. Most people swallow what they were taught without looking into it for themselves. We aren't a democracy. We will never be a democracy. Nor will we ever be a republic. We hold strong democratic values - and I don't mean the values of a political party - but we also know that the mob has to be held in check as much as the monarch.
      It saddens me that so many people lament our "lack of democracy" but can't quite grasp the fact that a middle road and an impossible to violate balance of power was the plan all along.

      1. qwark profile image59
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Chris:
        Yes! we are a "Democratic  Republic." A "novelty" on this planet of "fools."

    4. Ralph Deeds profile image70
      Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Do you think its not? If not, why not?

    5. ediggity profile image59
      ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No, we are a Constitutional Republic.  Here is a 10 min video that explains the true American form of Government:

      http://www.viddler.com/explore/CSC130/videos/25/

  2. jjmyles profile image64
    jjmylesposted 6 years ago

    We have a Constitutional Federation. Not a democracy

    1. Jeff Berndt profile image90
      Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      A Constitutional Republic.

      1. Jim Hunter profile image60
        Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Don't confuse them.

      2. Petra Vlah profile image60
        Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        The form of government is a Republic, but America keeps on talking about democracy in terms of democratic principles and even wants to export them without implementing such princeples at home first - that I call hypocrisy

        1. profile image0
          rakubaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          The forms in which US exports its "democracy" are revolts masteminded by CIA, support corrupted regimes, lies from sponsored media and  NGO, destruction of whole countries. No law would allow them to implement such "democracy" in America. Any revolt which America calls democratic outside US, would be severely suppresed in US, for sure. Would Tiananmen89-like event happen in US, the US govt would kill them all. Would any american state ask for independency as Kosovo or Tibet, there would be war and forget about "democracy" and any rights for independency.

          1. Petra Vlah profile image60
            Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            YOU SAID IT: that's exactly what American democracy is all about - hypocrisy at its best

            1. Ralph Deeds profile image70
              Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Petra, can you think of any countries which have a better government?

              1. Jim Hunter profile image60
                Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                The one she fled is probably wonderful.

                1. Ralph Deeds profile image70
                  Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  No doubt. That's why she left.

              2. Petra Vlah profile image60
                Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Ralph,
                there are plenty of countries with better government

                Jim,
                I left my contry fighting the communist regime, and yes, Romania is beautiful in case you did not know

                1. Ralph Deeds profile image70
                  Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  For example? I might agree with you. But I'm curious which ones you think are better.

                2. Jim Hunter profile image60
                  Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Romania is not a government in case you didn't know.

                  1. Petra Vlah profile image60
                    Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Jim, you don't have to play ignorant and even less should you play cute

                3. profile image0
                  rakubaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  As far as my experience allows to say that, I do believe, that true democracy is in Japan.

                  1. Petra Vlah profile image60
                    Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    And all of the Sacandinavian countries for that matter, but hey, Americans have a hard time accepting they are not the best at everything so let them dream on about "the land of the free"

                  2. Ralph Deeds profile image70
                    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    My recollection is that there have been several government scandals in Japan. And the U.S. deserves some credit, good or bad, for "assisting" in the establishment of the post-war Japanese government.

  3. Ralph Deeds profile image70
    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago

    The "Independent" Campaign Contributors aren't so independent.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor … h-20101031

  4. Petra Vlah profile image60
    Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago

    Maybe you should leave Jim. Go write a hub or do something productive for a change

    1. Jim Hunter profile image60
      Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Don't forget Bawny Fwank.

  5. Ralph Deeds profile image70
    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago

    By world standards we're considered a democratic country. Whether we are a Democracy or a Republic can be debated all night. Not worth the trouble.

    1. qwark profile image59
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      ...by defintion, we are a republic.

    2. Reality Bytes profile image93
      Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago in reply to this



      Who cares about world standards?

      We are a Republic!

    3. Jeff Berndt profile image90
      Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No, Ralph, it's really not a point of debate. If we were a democracy (which seems to be what the Tea Party movement wants, to listen to some of the "why didn't we get to vote on [issue]" rhetoric) there'd be a nationwide referendum on every decision and nothing would ever get done.

      We're a constitutional republic. Our representatives are elected democratically, yes, but our form of government is that of a constitutional republic.

      And don't mess with us, or we'll bring democracy to your country.

      1. Petra Vlah profile image60
        Petra Vlahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        and bringing democracy to this country would really be a shame, Jeff, right?

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image90
          Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I was making a joke about our blunder into Iraq, but, well, yeah. True democracy worked fine for Athens, since there were only a few hundred people who were allowed to vote and they all lived within walking distance of the agora.

          But it wouldn't work in a continent-spanning country of over 300 million people; the cost (in dollars, resources, and time away from productive work) of holding an election every time the country needs to make a policy decision is prohibitive. That's why some kind of representative government is needed. I like our constitutional republic, but a parliamentary version would be fine too.

          Your point is taken, though. I'd like it a lot better if we were more democratic and less plutocratic in practice.

      2. Ralph Deeds profile image70
        Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        That distinction stikes me as pedantry. The U.S. in common parlance all around the world is a democracy. Your definition is unreasonably narrow. There are many variations of democracies. Allowing everyone to vote on every issue would be completely impractical. By that definition there are no democracies, except in small towns in rural Kansas.

        Modern Definition of Democracy
        In order to deserve the label modern democracy, a country needs to fulfill some basic requirements - and they need not only be written down in it's constitution but must be kept up in everyday life by politicians and authorities:

            * Guarantee of basic Human Rights to every individual person vis-à-vis the state and its authorities as well as vis-à-vis any social groups (especially religious institutions) and vis-à-vis other persons.
            * Separation of Powers between the institutions of the state:
              Government [Executive Power],
              Parliament [Legislative Power] und
              Courts of Law [Judicative Power]
            * Freedom of opinion, speech, press and massmedia
            * Religious liberty
            * General and equal right to vote (one person, one vote)
            * Good Governance (focus on public interest and absence of corruption)

  6. csmcmanus profile image60
    csmcmanusposted 6 years ago

    This country is not really democratic. It is ran by special interest organizations. There is a saying that goes (sorta like) " The golden rule is the one with the gold makes the rule". As soon as democracy is no longer profitable, the model will change.

  7. Ralph Deeds profile image70
    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago

    Seems to me that many of us view the issues in a false "either/or," "black or white," dichotomy when the truth is somewhere in between. Our country is a democracy albeit an imperfect one.

    As somebody said "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    http://tartarus.org/~martin/essays/burkequote.html

  8. qwark profile image59
    qwarkposted 6 years ago

    Democracy = the people vote and are in control
    Republic =  the people vote and the elected control.
    Simple as that.

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image70
      Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Call it whatever you want. I won't quibble. Most people consider the U.S. a democratic country, a democracy.

      1. qwark profile image59
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Ralph:
        You are quite right. They do.

      2. Jeff Berndt profile image90
        Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        A democratic country, yes, and in social studies shorthand, a democracy, sure.

        But if we're going to talk about the nitty-gritty of how governing is done, it's totally a constitutional republic.

 
working