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Melissa Aussie admits bubble. Aussie Fed Keeps Ponzi Going

  1. bgamall profile image86
    bgamallposted 6 years ago

    This should be an eye opener to anyone living in Australia: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/busines … 5958005881

    1. WryLilt profile image87
      WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Why are you so obsessed with the Australian real estate market?

      1. bgamall profile image86
        bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I wrote an article on it here because a Rothschild bank, ING, was going to try to keep the bubble going by means of an absurd perpetual loan: <link snipped, no self-promoting links>

        This ties in to the whole misbehavior by the very biggest banksters in their zeal to steal and pillage from mainstreet everywhere. They have their eye on Australia, where they are offering weird loans just like in the US before the crash. This is the problem, a hiccup in China will crash the Aussie market and it will be a deep and profound crash. It has overheated even beyond what happened in the USA. Here is a nation where land should not be an issue yet the government is forbidding the selling of land to alleviate the bubble. This is a criminal government working in conjunction with banksters who do not care about mainstreet Australia.

        1. Marisa Wright profile image93
          Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          BG, as the article states, the perpetual loan is a well-established loan in other parts of the world - but there's no sign of it being offered in Australia at this point, even if ING is muttering about it.



          The Australian banking system is quite tightly regulated and there has been no significant change in the types of loans offered for the last ten or fifteen years.  Give me some examples of "weird loans" and I'll be happy to research the real facts for you!

    2. Marisa Wright profile image93
      Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The names Marisa not Melissa, bg, and I don't see anything in that article that I don't know already.

      1. bgamall profile image86
        bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I know that, and sorry Marisa. It was late when I posted that.

        But that article is pretty recent and shows that you have an empty continent with a manufactured shortage of land. Something to think about.

        1. Marisa Wright profile image93
          Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          BG, it's not as simple as that.

          Yes, we have an "empty continent", but people don't want to live anywhere but the coast.  Our inland cities and towns are under-populated because no one wants to live there - some councils are selling blocks of land for $1 to attract new residents! 

          On the coast, there's a constant demand for more land but it's not that simple.   Most of Australia's land is not very fertile and only suitable for cattle and sheep.  On the coast, where everyone wants to live, is also where our fertile farmlands are.  Developers have been steadily buying farmland and building homes on it - market gardens I remember from 20 years ago have disappeared.  The land on the outskirts of Sydney used to be the nation's food bowl and now it's housing developments! 

          If you want to talk about conspiracy theories and disaster scenarios, I'm much more worried about the risk that the government will hand over even more farmland to developers and the mining companies, and we'll end up in a situation where we have to import all our food - and how vulnerable would we be then?

    3. Kangaroo_Jase profile image83
      Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago

      bgamall, your title makes no sense.

      Whats a 'Melissa Aussie' & what Ponzi scheme are you referring to thats being run by an independent Federal bank? I see neither having any reference to the news article in your OP.

      1. bgamall profile image86
        bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Melissa is an Aussie. We have discussed the issue before more than once. The ponzi is a land shortage in a nation that is virtually empty.

        1. WryLilt profile image87
          WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Do you mean Marisa?

          1. bgamall profile image86
            bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Lol, of course. Don't get old child. smile

    4. psycheskinner profile image81
      psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

      ..but also mostly uninhabitable.

    5. psycheskinner profile image81
      psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

      Indeed, as I mentioned above.  Australia is effectively uninhabitable in the middle.  Unless you consider the lack of urban development in the Sahara is also manufactured by the banks.... There actually is a relative lack of land which is inhabitable and could be provided with immenities (e.g. water) at a reasonable cost.

      1. bgamall profile image86
        bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Just remember, you have the population less than of California in a land as large as the entire United States.

        1. WryLilt profile image87
          WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          ...And most of that is desert. 44% in fact.

          Maybe you should stop worrying about our country which narrowly avoided the recession and worry about your own which obviously hasn't.

        2. psycheskinner profile image81
          psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          It's. A. Desert. Continent.

          You. Can't. Make. Desert. Into. Residential. Suburbs.

          .

          1. bgamall profile image86
            bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Oh, you mean you can't have 2 million people living in Las Vegas? Are you kidding me?

            1. WryLilt profile image87
              WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              They get 88% of their water from Lake Mead. That cost millions and millions of dollars to build - and since we have a lower population than California, as you so nicely informed us, we don't have enough taxes to build huge lakes where ever we wish.

              1. Marisa Wright profile image93
                Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Plus the small fact that building a lake isn't enough - you need to have water to fill it.  We have enough trouble getting enough rainfall to fill our existing lakes and rivers, let alone artificial ones.

                I remember when I visited Las Vegas several years ago, the Bellagio fountains were still flowing but the ordinary population were suffering severe water restrictions.  Looks like it's still a problem too.

                http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= … b86mnWn9.w

                1. bgamall profile image86
                  bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Maybe so Marissa, but Aussie is a wealthy country. It should be very easy to desalinate. From this article I don't see Australia trying to limit population.

                  http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010 … 865692.htm

                  So the plan is to let the population grow, limit land use, and not gain new water resources?

                  Sounds like the plans of madmen.

                  1. Marisa Wright profile image93
                    Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    We have a couple of desalination plants but in case you haven't noticed, they only work near salt water - i.e. on the coast, where the large cities are already. Desal plants are no help inland!



                    There's a LOT of controversy right now about how big Australia should be allowed to grow.  Sure, we have a lot of land but as I said before, the main problem is we have very little fertile land.  So there is a definite limit on the amount of food we can grow.

              2. bgamall profile image86
                bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Las Vegas is not in California.

                1. WryLilt profile image87
                  WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  And I never said it was. I was referring to the population.

        3. darkside profile image79
          darksideposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Come on out here and discover for yourself just how much of this great southland is inhabitable.

          1. Mark Knowles profile image60
            Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            You should see how much of California is inhabitable. Same thing. Most of it is a desert. wink

            1. Aficionada profile image95
              Aficionadaposted 6 years ago in reply to this



              Most?  Mark, I believe you might want to check out a population density map.  "Some" or "much" would be more accurate.  "Most" is definitely an exaggeration.

              ETA:  Okay, in rereading your comment, I see that you are not saying that most of it is uninhabitable, but rather that most is a desert.  I'll check into that part too.  big_smile

              1. Mark Knowles profile image60
                Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                LOL My wife is from Colorado. Ask any Coloradan (not sure if that is the correct term) where their water gets diverted to. wink

                Glad you said something - if you are still looking for proofreading and/or editing work - drop me a line through my profile.

                1. Aficionada profile image95
                  Aficionadaposted 6 years ago in reply to this



                  smile
                  I realize my response sounded snippy, and I apologize for that.  The bristling came from the fact that many of my relatives live or have lived in California, both north and south.  Yes, diverted water is a big part of what makes some of the California desert regions habitable. 

                  At the same time, when you look a map of world deserts, you can see that while there is a great deal of desert area in CA, it is still rather different from the deserts of North Africa, Asia, and Australia.  I don't know how to compare the pre-water-diversion desert to current conditions, unless I could find a historical map of deserts.  Maybe that's research for another day.

                  Anyway, the point of the desert discussion was habitability, and that's where the population density map comes in - California is well-populated, even in the areas that are technically desert (thanks to Colorado smile ).

                  Thanks for the note about proofreading work. I'm still trying to figure out how to communicate via my new HP-specific e-mail account that won't use my online pseudonym as I've asked it to. May I leave a comment on one of your Hubs and ask you to delete it? Or would you have an account from which you could send me an e-mail through my profile?  [The proofreading service is still getting off the ground, but I am definitely ready to start taking orders. Thanks!]

                  1. Mark Knowles profile image60
                    Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Well, it is only different in that there is a ready supply of water available that can be shipped in. Dump millions of gallons of water into Australia or the Sahara every day and I am sure it could become inhabitable. Look at what Dubai has done:

                    http://blog.luxuryproperty.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/tiger-wood-dubai-300x166.jpg

                    http://blog.luxuryproperty.com/tiger-wo … s-nursery/
                    Insane!!

                    This, I feel, is our Next Big Problem. Canada will soon be forced into providing water to their cousins in the US - or else. wink

                    Spain is already forced to buy water from France and as far away as Scotland.

                    1. Aficionada profile image95
                      Aficionadaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                      Maybe "Next Big Problem" = Current? Personally, I think a lot of our world problems stem from the desire to convert barely habitable lands into paradise.  Florida did a pretty good job, and I'm not sure about the consequences there.  But look at New Orleans.  And, good heavens, the whole Dubai thing is nauseating at best! IMO

                      bgamall, sorry to have hijacked this thread. There are some interesting issues involved, but maybe I should take my USA and total-world discussions to another thread.  (I'm saying that theoretically, though, because I need to take a break for a bit this morning and attend to some other matters.)

    6. profile image0
      Toby Hansenposted 6 years ago

      Just what we need... another American commenting on something that he has no idea about.

      Oh well... at least this one knows that Australia is not tucked away between France, Switzerland and Germany!

      1. bgamall profile image86
        bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Hey, I have friends who are from Australia. Give me a break. Again, it seems the nation is intent on population growth, limits on land use and lack of new water resources.

        They may as well be shaking a giant champaign bottle!

      2. bgamall profile image86
        bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        And Toby I am proud of this. <link snipped, no self-promoting links>

        I like Australia, but know that their housing bubble will hurt a lot of people. I live where a housing bubble has really hurt the economy. I know how people have suffered!

        1. profile image0
          Toby Hansenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          1. Koalas are NOT @#%^*&$ bears!!!!
          2. Do not post self promotional links.

          1. WryLilt profile image87
            WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            The hub also appears to be:

            => Written shamelessly in an attempt to rank for two keywords.
            =>Have little sound, factual knowledge of the country.
            =>Assume that Outback Steakhouse is a national icon. Mate, there are only six of them in the whole country.
            =>Think that Crocodile Dundee is reflective of our nation.

            Don't think you'd like what I'd write if you put that hub in the extreme hub makeover forum!

            1. profile image0
              Toby Hansenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              In almost four decades, I have travelled and lived in every State & Territory of Australia. I cannot say that I have ever heard of Outback Steakhouse. Certainly not a Victorian thing.

              1. WryLilt profile image87
                WryLiltposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Yep, checked their site, appears they are only in NSW.

                1. profile image0
                  Toby Hansenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Aha! That explains it. Thanks WryLit smile

            2. bgamall profile image86
              bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Wrylilt, I am not interested in stuffing keywords. The hub was written in humor and is not a travel hub, which you  evidently missed, as I said that Outback was not an Aussie institution.

              Thanks for the analysis though. You missed the intent, then you based your analysis on missing the intent! Great.

            3. profile image68
              logic,commonsenseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              WL, you mean to say that Crocodile Dundee is not a national icon?  Dang, I thought all the cool Aussies were just like him! smile  Well, except for you, BP, earnest, salt and the rest of your countrymen that are on Hubpages!  Course I'm not so sure about earnest.  I think he may have an inner Dundee! smile

              1. bgamall profile image86
                bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I don't know who BP is, but evidently you mean me. I am not an Aussie, but actually I was trying to be quite clever, over the head of most. sad

          2. bgamall profile image86
            bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Toby, I have posted hubs on the forum before within the context of the discussion. They were not removed. I posted the link because you accused me of not knowing about Australia. I actually put together a flattering hub of Australia, and it was a humor hub, not a travel hub.

            I understand that Hubpages no longer allows links in context. That is unfortunate and I think a mistake. After all, you were the one who accused me of not knowing anything about Australia. One thing I have learned from your comments and others on this board is that some Aussies are very provincial. 

            BTW, Outback Steakhouse was started in the USA.

            1. profile image0
              Toby Hansenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Very provincial?

              Hmm.

              What part of "'In almost four decades I have travelled and lived in every State and Territory" do you have trouble understanding?

              1. bgamall profile image86
                bgamallposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Then you should have understood my hub when I said that the Outback guys thought themselves experts on Australia having seen Crocodile Dundee! It was a joke!!!!!

    7. Evan G Rogers profile image83
      Evan G Rogersposted 6 years ago

      All reserve banks reflect tyranny.

      Why is it that they can create money out of thin air, but if I do I go to jail?

      It's clearly nothing more than tyranny.

     
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