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Mass Public School Now Require permission to say Pledge

  1. Stacie L profile image86
    Stacie Lposted 6 years ago

    Guy Benson Groan:

       The principal of a public school in Brookline, Mass., is asking parents to fill out permission slips before their children
        can participate in a weekly recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance.

        Gerardo Martinez, the principal of The Devotion School, informed parents that the school would begin reciting the pledge in January over the public address system.

        Attached to the letter was a form that asked parents to check either: "Yes, my child will participate in the weekly Pledge of Allegiance" or "No, my child will not participate in the weekly Pledge of Allegiance."

        "I urge you to have a conversation as a family to help your children understand why I will be reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and to support them in feeling comfortable and confident in the decision on whether or not to participate," Martinez wrote in the letter.

        The school also sent parents a copy of the Pledge of Allegiance along with a note that defined the words "under God" as meaning "there is one Supreme entity for every citizen."

    http://townhall.com/tipsheet/GuyBenson/ … ite_pledge

  2. ediggity profile image60
    ediggityposted 6 years ago

    Weekly recitation?  I remember saying the pledge everyday in school.  If you are a US citizen, and don't want to pledge allegiance to this country, then leave it.  If you are not a US citizen, and are in a US public school, and don't want to pledge allegiance to this country, then leave it.

    1. kirstenblog profile image77
      kirstenblogposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Screw freedom! Right?
      Free speech? Whatever! This is America, not freedom land!
      Now pledge your allegiance to your overlords you worthless swine! Sound about right? wink

      1. ediggity profile image60
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Way to mock America.  Another person who is free to leave whenever they like.  North, East, South, or West.  I also ask you, what have you done to secure your and others freedom? Oh, excuse me, you're from the UK.  Your opinion doesn't matter to me on this issue.

    2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
      Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Nazi's used to recite a pledge.  I believe North Korea does the same thing.  It seems to be working well for them.

      1. ediggity profile image60
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        It seems to have worked well for us also.  The only ones who don't want to do it it are the ones who have no respect for their country.  the difference between those countries and ours, is that your free to leave.  Your not leaving Nazi Germany or North Korea dude.

        1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
          Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          "You're" not "your".  Maybe your elementary school spent too much time on political indoctrination and not enough on word usage.

          Aren't you one of those uber patriots who believes English should be the national language?  If so, it is YOUR duty to learn it and use it....

          or you could just move to another country.

          1. ediggity profile image60
            ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Oh my one your vs you're and it's all over for FREEDOM.  But alas you are correct, there is no excuse for my misuse of you're.  I didn't do it intentionally.  Oh if only Ron Montgomery would forgive me.

            1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
              Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              You did it twice.  Were you also silently pledging to yourself during math class?

              Your obsession with other people's degree of patriotism (as you define it) seems to have affected your education.

              Were you home schooled?

              1. ediggity profile image60
                ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I just kept doing it to give you something to complain about.  That's usually what you do, complain with no solution's.  I attended the school of hard knocks.

                1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                  Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I gave you a solution.  You can worry less about other people and work on areas in Y-O-U-R life that need improvement.

                  You can have that advice for free.

                  Happy Holidays.  smile

                  1. ediggity profile image60
                    ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I am not worried about anyone.  I simply made a statement.  It seems since your the one advising you have the concern.  Is that the best your going to do?  Resort to your vs your?  What a joke.


                    Happy Hollerdays to you to.lol

      2. Misha profile image75
        Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        LOL You forgot about USSR Ron. The country that started it all big_smile

        1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
          Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Yes, I have done my best to forget them.

          Thanks for reminding me. mad

          1. Misha profile image75
            Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            You better remember them Ron, cause looks like you guys are going to step into the same shit...

            1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
              Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I don't believe in the "slippery slope" theory.  There is a proper role for government in our system; participating in the process does not inevitably lead to totalitarianism.

              1. Misha profile image75
                Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Ah Ron, I so hope you are right on this. But I don't hold my breath...

                1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                  Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Try it.  Good cheap buzz. smile

    3. Pcunix profile image89
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ayup.  I'm old enough to remember it WITHOUT that stupid "under God", which I refused to say. Fortunately our town had a high Jewish population, so aversion to enforced Christianity wasn't seen as all that unusual.

      1. ediggity profile image60
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        At least you said it.  Was your teacher standing in front of your mouth when you said it to make sure you said God?

        1. Pcunix profile image89
          Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          If it were not for the 60-70% who were Jewish, my refusal might have been noticeable.

          We had small classes.

          http://s2.hubimg.com/u/4316061_f248.jpg

          I'm third row down, first on the left smile

          1. ediggity profile image60
            ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            So, you disagree with the whole pledge, or just the part about God?

            1. AdventureCyclist profile image61
              AdventureCyclistposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Combining patriotism with religion is always a bad idea.

              1. ediggity profile image60
                ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I'm fine with a person not wanting to say God in the pledge if they don't believe in God.  I still think they should have to say the pledge.

                1. gamergirl profile image61
                  gamergirlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  See, I'm not fine with that.  Since when is it a good thing to dictate what a person says?  A pledge is more important than that, and should be spoken truthfully from each person.  Not forced or made mandatory just because.

                  1. ediggity profile image60
                    ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Exactly, that's why I said I THINK they should.  It's a promise to the country.  If you don't want to make a promise to this country and you're a citizen, then go find a country you do want to make a promise to.

                2. Pcunix profile image89
                  Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Sure. Let's also have them promise that they'll never steal, never hurt anyone else, not pollute, follow posted speed limits, always stop at stop signs, and not drink and drive. While we are at it, let's have them promise not to overeat and never be mean or cruel to any living thing.

                  Wonderful idea. Shouldn't take more than an hour or so daily and it will mean SO much.

                  /sarcasm off

                  1. ediggity profile image60
                    ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Yeah, let's do that, because that's something we've always done.

                    sarcasm on

            2. Pcunix profile image89
              Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Definitely with the part about any imaginary gods.

              As to the rest, forced displays of patriotism are meaningless. In appropriate circumstances, I have no issues with the pledge as it existed originally. As a daily ritual, I think it is both pointless and a bit frightening.

  3. lovemychris profile image79
    lovemychrisposted 6 years ago

    You are wrong. This country is SUPPOSED to stand for freedom, remember? You seem to want to force indoctrination on them.
    Cause when i was a kid, we-had to say the Pledge of Allegiance, AND the Our Father Who Art In Heaven.
    Nice little N. Koreans huh?
    God and Country.

    But--which God?
    And--indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all? Oh, I don't think so.

    1. ediggity profile image60
      ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      If you don't want to pledge allegiance, then go find another country.  Don't insult the men and woman who fought to give you that right.  What have you done to secure your and others freedom?

      1. Cagsil profile image60
        Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        roll

        1. Misha profile image75
          Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          See, we got The Patriot around big_smile

          1. ediggity profile image60
            ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            You should be the most patriotic seeing that you've probably had to work the hardest out of anyone to be here.

            1. Misha profile image75
              Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Not sure I understand what you are trying to say. Can you re-phrase please?

              1. ediggity profile image60
                ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Are you originally from America Misha?

                1. Misha profile image75
                  Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  No, I am from Russia.

                  1. ediggity profile image60
                    ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    So was it easy for you to come to America?

        2. ediggity profile image60
          ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          smile  You can find another country also if you don't like it here, and don't want to pledge allegiance.

          1. Cagsil profile image60
            Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Hey E,

            Your arrogance is appalling to say the least. You rather step on someone's freedom than defend, as I see your actions by your posts.

            You certainly need to learn your place in this world and dictating other people should leave America, because they choose to not pledge to the country is absurd.

            The one most important about America freedom, which seems to escape your grasp is to NOT infringe upon other people's rights.

            I suggest you learn it.

            1. ediggity profile image60
              ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              My arrogance?  You defend the right not to pay homage to the individuals who have died and continue to die FOR YOUR FREEDOM, and I'm the one considered with self importance.  First, get a dictionary, second, get a reality check.  I have the freedom to stick my middle finger up at people when they walk by, but I'm not going to because it's disrespectful.  I have the freedom to say mean things to people, but I'm not going to because it's disrespectful.  We all have the FREEDOM to do a lot of things, but it doesn't mean we should, because they are disrespectful.  It's not about what you can and can not do with freedom.  It's about showing a little respect for the FREEDOM that's been GIVEN to you by bloodshed.

              1. Cagsil profile image60
                Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Yeah, arrogance. You said leave the country if I don't. It absurd.
                It appears you lack vision or just wisdom itself, but you fail to even understand the basics of rights to begin with.
                That is YOUR choice. It doesn't matter why you don't. Why you don't is actually irrelevant. Again, it boils down to choice.
                Telling someone to leave the country they live isn't disrespectful? roll
                Choice?
                In actuality, there should be no need for governments in the first place. However, that's a different argument and not meant for this forum.

                1. ediggity profile image60
                  ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I said YOU CAN find another country.

                  Yes, I have no infinite wisdom like CAGSIL (arrogance)

                  Exactly, my choice, just like you have a choice to do the pledge, or not.

                  I guess it may be depending how you take it.

                  No, FREEDOM, I even capitalized it for you.  It's covered under the first amendment.

                  Yeah, no Governments, Anarchy.  please see the first sentence if you have a different idea for government in the United States.

      2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Someone fought and died so my free will could be taken away?

        Huh.. you'd think that would have been in the papers or something.  Can you site a source please?

        1. ediggity profile image60
          ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Someone died to give you the freedom to post that on the internet.  Freedom of speech.  You should show a little respect to those people.

          1. Doug Hughes profile image60
            Doug Hughesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            One of the highest acts of patriotism of my lifetime happened in China after  the Tieneman Square massacre. The government was rolling tanks to quell any further demonstrations for democracy and ONE man stood in front of a column of tanks and would not let them proceed. It was heroic.

            It was not the act of a lemming who bought into the indoctrination - he held to a set of VALUES greater than blind obedience to the state. I'm all for the USA - I served in the Navy. I vote. That doesn't mean the USA can count on my approval or silence when the US is wrong. And I will apply my values when I decide.

            There are principles involved here - and you would expel from this country any individual who won't recite some rather silly words - a flag is a piece of cloth that the USSC says I can use for kindling.

            1. ediggity profile image60
              ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I didn't write expel.  I wrote that they could go find another country that they want to pledge allegiance to.  That's the difference.  I realize that there is a right to not say anything, but it's disrespectful not to.  It's not as much to do with saying the words, as it is to pay homage and respect to the people who died in order to provide that freedom.  It's not about some conspiracy theory indoctrination.  It's about saying to the youth, hey man, you know why this flag is there?  It's because we are in America and people died for it.  They died to put stars on that flag and create this country.

              1. Pcunix profile image89
                Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                They must be reminded every day?

                How amazingly forgettable this lesson must be.

                1. ediggity profile image60
                  ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Yes, and unfortunately it is.

              2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Finally you say something true.  Many Native Americans did in fact die as stars were added to the flag.

                Congratulations, there may be hope for you yet.

                1. ediggity profile image60
                  ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  We shouldn't forget anyone.  The final outcome is still this United States.  I'm glad you think there's hope for me.  That really makes me feel better.

  4. kirstenblog profile image77
    kirstenblogposted 6 years ago

    I pledge impertinence
    to the flag waving
    of the undecided co-conspirators of America
    and to the Republicans, which I can't stand
    one abomination
    under fraud
    Indefensible
    With liberty and justice
    for the rich



    It sure has been awhile since I have said that particular pledge wink

    1. kerryg profile image86
      kerrygposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      LOL

    2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
      Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Nice pledge.

  5. kerryg profile image86
    kerrygposted 6 years ago

    Weekly? We had to say it every day during my brief public school career.

    I think it makes sense to ask parents, though. Some families have religious objections to swearing pledges.

  6. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 6 years ago

    There is absolutely no reason to get the parents permission for something that has been done for ages.

    If the child chooses to not say it, then that is their choice. There is no permission required.

    Either say or don't.

  7. Misha profile image75
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    At the first glance this certainly looks like a step toward freedom. Though somehow it does not fit into the current trend of reducing freedoms.

    Call me paranoid, but a signed slip not permitting a child to say the pledge can later be used to prove the parents are un-patriotic, not loving The Motherland, and therefore being enemies of The Freedom - which provides solid grounds for any kind of corrective action - from community works to imprisonment and execution...

    1. Doug Hughes profile image60
      Doug Hughesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      in the USSR maybe, when it was...

      Of course if we keep electing Republicans, they will be building gulags.

  8. 0
    Sophia Angeliqueposted 6 years ago

    I understand humanism. I do not understand patriotism.
    I understand thinking objectively. I do not understand indoctrination.
    I understand respect for others. I do not understand coercion.
    I understand the line between private choices and public duty. I do not understand when private choices are enforced to be public duty.

    But then, that's me. And I wouldn't say a pledge of allegience to any country. Because I don't happen to think that countries are more important than people.

    1. Misha profile image75
      Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      That we certainly can agree on smile

  9. AdventureCyclist profile image61
    AdventureCyclistposted 6 years ago

    It would seem that 99.999% of people are patriotic to whichever country they are citizens of. They may not always believe in their governments, but they are always patriotic to the country.

    Being either forced/asked to recite a pledge every week is kind of non-sensical, and normally comes from those people in power who are insecure of their own power-base, and seek to implant their own version of patriotism in the people.

  10. gamergirl profile image61
    gamergirlposted 6 years ago

    Birth in a country does not mean you are required to be patriotic to it.

    Patriotism should be something that grows in a person.  Further, a person can love their country without speaking a single outward pledge throughout their whole lives.

    Actions - they ARE in fact, louder than words.

  11. Christene profile image82
    Christeneposted 6 years ago

    "Brookline school officials now say a permission slip won't be necessary for Devotion School kids to opt out of the Pledge of Allegiance and insist the document sent home earlier this week was only meant to "encourage discussion.""

    http://brookline.patch.com/articles/bro … sion-slips

  12. AdventureCyclist profile image61
    AdventureCyclistposted 6 years ago

    It worked here P

  13. 61
    foreignpressposted 6 years ago

    The United States is becoming so watered down that it will cease to exist within 25 years. This is in the name of multiculturalism and individual rights. What's odd is that immigrants coming here -- both legally and illegally -- demand to have their respective cultures honored and "celebrated." So we pledge allegiance to . . . what? Or do we have no allegiance to anything? The future is very scary, indeed. Hopefully the Second Coming won't be too far behind.

  14. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    So, do you think the children of non-resident aliens who are't citizens or intending to become citizens should say the pledge?  Or will we concede there need to be some exceptions?

    Personally I come from a country that doesn't have pledges or glue the flag to everything.  But if it was invaded I would be willing to die protecting it.  Rituals and ceremonies are not the measure of civic commitment.

    1. 61
      foreignpressposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      When one emigrates to a country there is usually assimilation. To not adopt the country's culture and values -- at least to some extent -- is hypocrisy. Same with non-citizen children brought here. If they disagree they should relocate to another country more to their liking. There has to be cohesion among a people. To go our separate ways is to invite liberty and justice for no one. Question: Would you be willing to die for a land mass you don't identify with? Highly unlikely.

      1. ediggity profile image60
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thank you.

      2. psycheskinner profile image81
        psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I specified *non-resident alien* not immigrant.  You do know that other nationalities live here in the US right, sometimes for long periods, sometimes with their kids in school?  Hundred of thousands of them.

        So having made it really clear what I am asking, do you really think the children of a foreign national (such as a scientist collaborating on a research project) attending school in the US should have to swear allegiance to the US?

        And if not does this not suggest that some exceptions need to be made?

        Or am I missing the point and you actually think the US should be utter;ly closed to all long term visitors with children, incase they... I don't know, spread funny foreign ideas like the virtures of rugged individualism or only making pledg that you fully understand and truly mean.

      3. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        No, I absolutely wouldn't be willing to die for any country, whether I was born in it or not. I do not understand the concept of patriotism. i think it is a construct created by some to get them to go to war.

        Yes, if someone came to take what was mine, I would protect it if it was worth it. However, sometimes, discretion is better than valor. My life is worth far more than a few electronic gismos.

        I suppose, coming from the country that has the highest crime rate and violence rate in the world, I see this differently.

        I also wouldn't say a pledge to a country. I believe all people are humans, regardless of where they are born, and all need to be treated with respect.

        I do concur, though, about the assimilation, and I don't believe diversity works, although it is politically correct to say it does. I think too much diversity causes friction.

  15. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    Personally I find it ironic that the US ideal of everything doing exactly what they--and their children--will do, rather than being ordered around by the federal government, well, it has some blind spots. Like making every school room display a flag even if they might prefer to spend the money on books or something else. Commonwealth countries stopped having to display the Queen's portrait decades ago--and we're meant to be the type the prefers to be told what to do.

 
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