jump to last post 1-50 of 86 discussions (407 posts)

Is America "Exceptional"?

  1. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    I read this in my local paper yesterday. What do you think?
    Is "exceptionalism" a good word or a bad word?
    Does it describe what America was? What America is today?

    By Kathleen Parker
    Sunday, January 30, 2011

    He didn't say it. That word: "exceptional." Barack Obama described an exceptional nation in his State of the Union address, but he studiously avoided using the word conservatives long to hear.

    It's a funny thing, this focus on a single word that isn't much heard from this president but that tumbles so easily - and adamantly - from the lips of Republican contenders for his title.

    We're going to be hearing it a lot in the coming months as Republicans try to out-exceptionalize each other for the presidential nomination. Exhausted already?

    The exceptional issue may be political, but it isn't only that. The idea lies smack at the heart of how Americans view themselves, and the role of government in their lives and in the broader world. Is America exceptional or isn't she? Is there something about this country that makes us unique in the world?

    Of course there is, and Obama has frequently acknowledged those things, including in the State of the Union. But he seems to avoid the word because, among other possible reasons, it is fraught with layers of meaning and because, to some minds, there's always the possibility he doesn't quite believe it. A December poll (USA Today-Gallup) found that 37 percent of Americans don't think Obama believes that the "U.S. has a unique character that makes it the greatest country in the world."


    This nevertheless leaves a majority - 58 percent - who do think he believes it, compared with 86 percent who thought Ronald Reagan did, followed by Bill Clinton (77) and George W. Bush (74).

    On the right, the word "exceptional" - or "exceptionalism" - lately has become a litmus test for patriotism. It's the new flag lapel pin, the one-word pocket edition of the U.S. Constitution. To many on the left, it has become birther code for "he's not one of us."

    Between left and right, however, are those who merely want affirmation that all is right with the world. Most important, they want assurance that the president shares their values. So why won't Obama just deliver the one word that would prompt arias from his doubters?

    I asked House Speaker John Boehner that question in a recent interview, curious to see how he'd explain the chasm between Democrats who see no need to talk of exceptionalism and Republicans who consider it crucial to their national identity.

    Boehner said that either "the left" seems afraid of the word or, perhaps, they don't believe it. This caused a small tempest of protest in some quarters.

    Obama did indeed speak of America's uniqueness, even recognizing Boehner, who grew up without privilege to become the third-most powerful person in government, as an exemplar of the American dream.

    Do we make too much of a single word?
    Exceptionalism became radioactive a couple of years ago when Obama was asked at an overseas news conference whether he subscribes to "the school of American exceptionalism that sees America as uniquely qualified to lead the world."

    His answer has haunted him since:

    "I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism."

    I remember thinking at the time: Bzzzzt. Wrong, Harvard. That is not the correct answer. There was more to his response, in fact, but the impression was already set.

    What Obama added was that "we have a core set of values that are enshrined in our Constitution, in our body of law, in our democratic practices, in our belief in free speech and equality, that, though imperfect, are exceptional."

    Not so hard to say after all?

    Calling oneself exceptional inarguably is problematic in the midst of an ongoing financial crisis; two wars that have resulted in untenable casualties; and crippling debt and deficits that betray the trust of future generations and behold us to China.

    It also may feel jingoistic and inappropriate in these global times for one nation to set itself apart for self-admiration.

    We mustn't brag, after all. Great nations don't have to remind others of their greatness. They merely have to be great.

    Whether to take exception to exceptionalism is an interesting problem for the president and the nation. Perhaps it is best resolved through a presidential address in which Obama takes possession of the word and settles the question once and for all: What does American exceptionalism mean in today's world?

    Mr. President?

    kathleenparker@washpost.com

    1. Marisa Wright profile image94
      Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I think all countries have their own unique character. However "unique" just means different, one-of-a-kind.  "Exceptional" would mean that America stands above all other countries in the world.

      I have only visited America a couple of times.  On those visits, most of the people I met seemed poorly informed about basic geography and history, let alone current international affairs. 

      America is a bit like Australia (where I live) because it's huge, and a long way from most other continents, so many people never go abroad, and have to rely on the media for their view of world events.  The news coverage in America seemed so heavily biased, Americans basically have no basis on which to form a rational, accurate view of how their country rates against others.

      I would rate America below almost any European country in terms of culture.

    2. bgamall profile image85
      bgamallposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with Marissa. The problem is that the neocons want American "exceptionalism" to be a code word for world military domination. Do not think for a minute that the neocons plan to stand by and have a stable world without provoking Russia. Even Pat Buchanan says these neocons are crazy and he is a conservative. He calls them the war party.

    3. Genna East profile image86
      Genna Eastposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Excellent question.  According to recent polls, we (America) are not the “happiest” nation.  However, we do have enormous diversity, and the words, “melting pot” are significant; meaning, that we are more accepting of different cultures, ethnicities, races, etc. than other countries.   I wish our education standards had not dropped so significantly.  This is definitely where we need to do the work.   (I wish I could underline this about a dozen times.)  Nevertheless, the US of A seems to be the country where a number of others want to live – and I’m not referring solely to individuals from third-world countries. 

      So many countries have wonderful qualities that are markedly exceptional.  (I don't have the time to list them all here.)  To call one country exceptional over another is far too subjective in today's rapidly changing world.

  2. Mrs. J. B. profile image62
    Mrs. J. B.posted 5 years ago

    I would not use the word exceptional to describe America today. Perhaps ho-hum

    1. John Holden profile image61
      John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It's not really up to Americans to declare themselves exceptional.

      I mean, what's to stop me declaring myself exceptional, it's meaningless unless others say that I'm exceptional isn't it?

    2. TheSenior profile image60
      TheSeniorposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I wouldn't call America ho-hum, but I would call our schools ho-hum.  the reason is that out of our medicore schools there are still people that thirst for knowledge and once they get this knowledge then ssome of these turn that knowledge in buninesses and even powerful businesses.

      I think that we still have the larfest # of rich people and now because of our economy way to many struggling/poor.  But almost everday you hear that some person got themselves out of the gutter and decided 'enough' and started something that would either benefit America directly or indirectly.

  3. Doug Hughes profile image60
    Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago

    My daughter is 'exceptional'. Second grade - she takes her afternoon math and science with other gifted students. In the morning she does an hour of reading with the third grade, because she entered the 2nd grade at a 3rd grade reading level. One thing that I will NOT let her day is that she's 'better' than any other student.

    American is exceptional - there are examples from the genius of Thomas Jefferson to the contributions of the Wright Brothers, Henry Ford and Bill Gates. But if the word 'exceptional' translates on the world stage to - "We're better than you." then 'exceptional' is a word the President need not utter.

    My daughter doesn't need to sour her relationships with arrogance. Kathy will need some of the children who would be offended. Team activities will be important and Kathy doesn't need for HER team to be committed to see her individually fail. Kids and countries remember being insulted for a long time.

    1. John Holden profile image61
      John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Then the UK has the genius of Dickens, Shakespeare, James Brindley and Alan Turing.

      So what?

      1. Doug Hughes profile image60
        Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        John -my wife is Russian - if I did not learn a little and respect  a lot of her national  history & heritage, we wouldn't get along too well. I suspect that's true of nations.

        1. John Holden profile image61
          John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Exactly Doug. I'm sure that she could tell you of some exceptional Russians too.

          1. Doug Hughes profile image60
            Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I learned about Peter the Great before I visited Saint Petersburg.

            The 'Great Patriotic War' is thier term for WWII. 26 million Russians died, 10 million of them soldiers. The US lost less than 300,000. I don't discount the pivotal importance of America's entry into the war, but American history ignores the role(s) of other nations. This attitude often earns the US the contempt of other nations.

    2. 70
      logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      We may have out flaws, but we are better than any other country on the whole.  It is what it is.

      1. John Holden profile image61
        John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Really, I disagree! A lot.

        1. PaulStaley1 profile image84
          PaulStaley1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Me too, I disagree! Humans are exceptional!

          1. John Holden profile image61
            John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Indeed we are.

    3. skip55 profile image84
      skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I have not seen any Balzac's in the US. Or Shakespeare, or Tolstoy, or Beethoven. Exceptional cultures raise exceptional people. How about Einstein? Hmm.

  4. Stump Parrish profile image60
    Stump Parrishposted 5 years ago

    In my opinion entirely too many Americans base their view that America is exeptional on one fact. The fact that they were born here is what makes America great in their opinion. We are still good at a lot of things and that includes ignoring the cold hard facts that we disagree with.

    1. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image94
      Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      We're really good at ignoring that we are a "has been" of the arena known as "exceptional;" unless you consider "exceptionally brain dead, brainwashed, violent, ignorant, and media controlled," of course.

      1. Doug Hughes profile image60
        Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I strongly disagree.. Ask Bill Gates.

        1. 0
          zampanoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          "exceptional" is a word of excuse in the mouth of politicians.
          The french representatives use it often, when they're uneasy to explain one or other choice apparently done against all good sense.
          "The French exception" is the key.
          Anyway, America is amazing, wheather exceptional or not.
          I'd say, any people is exceptional, because there's no such thing as two identical things.
          I thank America for Bill Cody, Huxley(even if he was Britt), The Mamas & Papas, Zappa, the Velvet and Lou Reed. Without forgetting the Beach Boys.
          And so many I forget to mention.
          God bless America !
          And now, I'm gonna hit me bunk.

        2. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image94
          Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Ah, Bill Gates, the man who had to have the courts break up his monopoly; he's a classic American.  The products produced by Steve Jobs are much better, and universally recognized as such.

          1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
            uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/bu … softtrial/

            http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/28/busin … -SOFT.html

            http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/28/busin … -SOFT.html

            Monopoly is a tricky concept since it is rooted in arbitrary definitions. Olivette produces a monopoly share of electric typewriters, but who cares.  A monopoly in buggy whips or button hooks would hardly draw anyone's attention.

            If Apples products were overwhelmingly superior in every way wouldn't Apple have a larger market share.  Microsoft products enjoy such a large market share for a reason.  I was not compelled by Microsoft to purchase a Windows based PC.  Bill Gates' bully boys didn't show up at my front door to "make me an offer I couldn't refuse."

            1. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image94
              Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              America has been owned by international bankers since they had J.F.K. killed for planning to get rid of the federal reserve.  All you need to remember is that whenever the game of monopoly is won, all of that fake fed note money goes right back into the box, and we get the pleasure of seeing the whole system have to pick up the pieces, and create a new game.

              1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
                uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Bilderbergers, Tri-Lateral Commission, Council on Foreign Relations, Skull and Bones, Luminatti, Rosacrucians, Free Masons, Knights Templar, did I forget any?

                1. Jeff Berndt profile image89
                  Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  You forgot the John Birchers.

                  1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
                    uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    THe Birchers were the suspicious not the suspects.  The paranoid not the paranoia  For the Birchers the Tri-Lateral Commission and Council on Foreign Relations, et al were the focus of their animosity.

        3. skip55 profile image84
          skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          The only thing Gates proved is that he can make money.

          1. ediggity profile image59
            ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Then ask Larry Page, Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs, or Mark Zuckerberg.  smile

  5. ediggity profile image59
    ediggityposted 5 years ago

    Yes, America is exceptionally awesome.  smile

  6. jokeapptv profile image60
    jokeapptvposted 5 years ago

    america is great people are always trying to get in here 24/7

  7. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    ediggity -- have you applied for a position as Obama speechwriter? You've resolved the issue perfectly!
    Perfectly!!!
    We are "awesome."
    That's national pride.
    I agree with those who say the word "exceptional" implies superiority over other nations.
    But I get the impression that those who are using that word like a mantra intend it just that way...

    1. 0
      zampanoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hello Mighty Mom.
      If everyone is exceptional, no one is superior or inferior.
      Everybody is unique.
      As you and me.

      1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
        Ralph Deedsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Good answer. The infinitude of the common man.

        1. KFlippin profile image61
          KFlippinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Uh Huh, let us digress and take the high road of proseletizing (sp?).........or to make it clearer, play the role of the tonic salesman in an old Western, the fake answer to all that ails...in lying words or a fake bottle of colored water, same difference from then to now....

          1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
            Ralph Deedsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I didn't make that comment up. I think it was Ralph Waldo Emerson. Same first name. Same philosophy. Beats Ayn Rand's "Fxxk the common man and everbody else!"

            1. KFlippin profile image61
              KFlippinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              ??? You think that is answerable?  Supportable?  Has any rebuttal merit whatsoever??

              Would you rather talk about Ralphie in A Christmas Story, his rights were violated by his Mom, he was forced in to so many layers of clothing to protect him from the cold that he could not walk. Do you recall how his arms popped up from the bulk? Ever happened to you? Has to me!  Should we sue his Mom in todays America??

              Or can we still laugh?  I doubt it.  Emerson would never have foreseen this very wierd world we find ourselves in today, no doubt he would be jailed by now, or in protective custody and or on an Islamic hit list.

  8. PrettyPanther profile image85
    PrettyPantherposted 5 years ago

    If America truly is "exceptional" then there is no need to keep saying so.  It will be evident to most.

    I believe some are intent on making a point of saying it because, deep down, they sense that we, as a nation, are losing some of the qualities that made us exceptional.

    A true leader just leads; he doesn't have to force others to follow.

    1. KFlippin profile image61
      KFlippinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Well said I think at the moment.......

  9. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 5 years ago

    If the US is unique from Canada,then it logically follows that Canada must therefore be unique from the US

  10. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    That's accepted. The US is unique from Canada and from every other country. In fact, every country is unique, although some have similarities.
    The question is, is CANADA exceptional?

    1. Greek One profile image80
      Greek Oneposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Define exceptional

      1. Doug Hughes profile image60
        Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Define Canada.

        1. Greek One profile image80
          Greek Oneposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I would be more than happy to outline the aspects of my country which have made me fall in love with it.  I would be even more happy to examine the special historical, linguistic, cultural, political and economic forces that shaped its unique character.

          Doing so however would bring me close to an expression of nationalistic pride... which is in itself very unCanadian

          1. megs78 profile image60
            megs78posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            haha, love that!  so true

    2. Stump Parrish profile image60
      Stump Parrishposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      As long as people are kept busy yelling how execptional they are, they wont have the time to discover the truth about how far this country has slipped in most areas worth tracking.

      What is wrong with admitting the people running this country for the last 40 years got us where we are today? It wasn't one side or the other. It was every damned one of them.

      This country is fat, lazy and stupid. It is exceptionally unbelievable we haven't completely destroyed the country by now. Fixing the country isn't an option to those who are more interested in pointing out who is to blame for where we are.

      So I hope all you exceptional Americans keep right on being exceptional until this country is no more. I believe that''s the one thing exceptional people truly deserve.

      We need an Exceptional American variety show where we can show case all these exceptional people in competions with their peers from around the world. Any exceptional American that answers two questions correctly, get a trip to Disney World for their exceptional family during the annual Exceptional Americans Awards Show week, sponsored by the Drug Companies.

      1. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image94
        Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Two thumbs up, Stump; pride  before the fall.

    3. Marisa Wright profile image94
      Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      "Exceptional" means unusual or extraordinary (thanks Eaglekiwi).  Every country in the world can't be unusual!  They can all be different, and have their own unique characteristics.  They can all have features which deserve to be called special.

      But if you're going to call one country "exceptional", you're putting it above all the other countries.  And without visiting other countries so you can compare, how can anyone make that claim?

  11. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    I cannot define Canadian exceptionalism.
    I am not Canadian.
    I can't even define American exceptionalism and I AM American!
    It's rapidly becoming "annoying exceptionalism" in my unexceptional head lol

    1. Doug Hughes profile image60
      Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      But most of think you ARE exceptional - even your critics call you unique.

  12. uncorrectedvision profile image60
    uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago

    I am not surprised that we no longer understand American Exceptionalism.  We have been moving at an accelerating rate away from that Exceptionalims since the turn of the last century.  Woodrow Wilson is often credited with the notion of American Exceptionalism.  It is hard to give Wilson credit since Wilson, great Democrat, was a bigot and an elitist.  I no longer attempt to explain any intellectual concept regarding liberty, natural law, free markets or American Exceptionalism to any one, especially liberals.  The most meaningful knowledge is the knowledge we gain for ourselves.

    1. 0
      china manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      There was a hint of Exceptionalism in the american people, for just a while.  Americans seemed to be rising above the genocide that gave them so much land for free, the slavery that worked it for free, the bitter divisive war that is still being fought in the imagination of the people.  After the founding of new politics of the modern government and unions in gangsterism and corruption. For a brief moment the American people were Exceptional when despite the cold war their imagination was opened up by getting into space, onto the moon and Kennedy was the promise of more new things and changes. Then you lost it and went back to wars and ideological rampages, your corruption became normal business, and your rich turned to creating their mountains of wealth but keeping it in other countries, while they force you to live in debt to them and the world, a debt they avoid by owning both you and the debt with their outside money and interests.

      1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
        uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks for the historical coproscopy.  (copro - scopy)

        1. 0
          china manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I forgot the trend toward an inability to spell.

          1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
            uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            coproscopy - an originally coined word based in the Greek roots for dung and view.  May be a better word - another originally coined - coproblepsia - a crappy outlook.

            Condescension is repulsive.

            1. 0
              china manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              As is any claim to Exceptionalism.

              1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
                uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Their are those upon whom the reasoning would be wasted.

  13. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    Well, since we're apparently living in the last days of Rome, who wants to join me in the vomitorium?
    Serious.
    When I hear people "complain" about American Exceptionalism it tests my gag reflex!

    1. 0
      china manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Not the last days - just the days waiting for something new and better - we hope.  Americans may be many things from downright bad to highly successful, inventive, and some are exceptional - but as a nation you have not risen above any other in any way that can be seen as Exceptional.  Exceptionalism as a noun description - when used without some exceptional national achievement recognised by the world outside the US is just hollow Nationalism.  Now - if the US disposed of most of its armed forces, withdrew from those areas of the world it has no right to be and devoted itself to being the powerhouse of world change and improvement that it still could be - then the US would have the right to put Exceptional in its title.

  14. Doug Hughes profile image60
    Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago

    "I no longer attempt to explain any intellectual concept regarding liberty, natural law, free markets or American Exceptionalism to any one, especially liberals."

    This sophistry is for SOME a code for American Imperialism. The kind where you invade a country that's no threat and seize the assets you want. (Did you know that ONLY American companies got contracts for Iraq oil.) That national thuggery went out of fashion after WWII. You can't talk openly about invading to steal, so you develop a code word that excuses a war of aggression. "Exceptionalism".

    This is cute, clever and coy. When you are talking to true believers, you know you are talking about bullying small countries into submitting to American Corporations (without a war when you do it right. But when there are moderates who get queasy about crimes on a national level - you redefine the code so 'exceptionalism' now is code for patriotic.

    Works like a charm unless someone is rude enough to demand you define the term, meaning and limits... In that case, you have to revert to the opening quote.

    1. uncorrectedvision profile image60
      uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you for not responding.  It is what I have come to expect.  Thank you.

    2. Jim Hunter profile image61
      Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      So when are you moving?

  15. kephrira profile image62
    kephriraposted 5 years ago

    America is exceptional because they say that the rules apply to everyone except them.

    1. barranca profile image77
      barrancaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      amen.  The whole idea of "exceptionalism" is a ludicrous, pernicious mask.  A mythic america that allows us to dominate the world, start unjust wars, spend untold wealth on military weapons and then congratulate ourselves on our moral rectitude.

  16. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image61
    VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 5 years ago

    No doubt, America is very much exceptional. From its very formation, the people in America think they are super-humans, and no one can question them. The unlimited natural resources make them think like that. But it is only 325 years old. Its resources may not long and they are bound to experience scarcity in due course.

    Shortage or scarcity of resources in other parts of the world can be adjusted by help from neighbouring countries. But When their turn comes, no one will come to their help due to their isolation.
    ... and also due to their past sins.

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Just out of curiosity, have you ever visited the US? You seem to be a self-proclaimed expert on Americans. I've never heard anyone in the US claim that we or anyone here is a super-human.

      1. junko profile image79
        junkoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Venugopal;  Two years and no hubs????? why????

        1. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image61
          VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          All my hubs were pro-Indian and were turned down with comments like "substandard" and "language not understandable"  "insufficient stuff" and "without Photos".  I have sent more than 25 hubs which all were turned down. So, I have decided not to do that. But is it necessary to post a hub for everyone?  Cant we live without a hub?  I comment only on subjects which are familiar to me and which needs answer. Otherwise, I have many other important  work.

      2. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image61
        VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        No. I have not visited US and there is no need to visit that country just to comment on controversial matters only. It is not necessary to visit a country to assess its performance. There are several other avenues to go into it deeply.  For eg., the oath-taking ceremony of several US Presidents were seen in TV and websites. Can I see it if I come to America? The previous President, George Bush half-heartedly leaving the white house and the present president not inviting him for the dinner that followed were watched here with anxiety.  We could also see his airplane circiling over the White house for  a while before leaving. Are all these not enough? I have also had indepth study of US history from its foundation. 

        Many of my friends and relatives are there. If I have a chance to migrate, your America will be my first choice.  Because I like it very much. 

        I consider America is the guarantor of freedom in many countries,  have helped many countries from becoming defunct. It is saving several countries from extinction.  The only worry on them is that they are continuously stirring the nest and never give rest to their soldiers...  their resources are wasted on worthless and pro-terrorist countries.

        1. KFlippin profile image61
          KFlippinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Why can you not migrate?? We seem to have no issue with illegal immigrants? So I am truly curious why you would refrain.

          1. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image61
            VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            You want me to migrate illegally?......  As your forefathers did 500 years back?
            I have some family commitments and when I complete them, I shall think of migrating to US.

        2. KFlippin profile image61
          KFlippinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Something about your post here makes me sad, very sad.  I do hope one day you can come to America and it will then live up to your expectations.

          1. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image61
            VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            No special expectations for me... Just the Americans should shed violence and stop encouraging violence... ie., terrorism. Should encourage peace and nonviolence.

        3. junko profile image79
          junkoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          O'k  Mr. Venugopal, I understand you now, you don't like to write mail because..., you rather read mail and comment on the  mail.  I believe you.  I just would never could have figured that out because the truth was too simple. Just asked.

          1. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image61
            VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I liked it first... to write hubs.. All my hubs were pro-Indian and would like to point out the wrongs done by the next large democracy, America. But the HP moderaters were too much pro-American patriots and just flagged my hubs. From a country with thousands of years'' history, I cannot accept that America is greater than India... just because of its wealth.... We, Indians were the wealthiest nation in the world and its wealth were robbed by outsiders, who speak law now.

        4. Jeff Berndt profile image89
          Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          "It is not necessary to visit a country to assess its performance."
          Thank goodness for that, or most of us Americans wouldn't get to say a darn thing. smile

  17. 0
    Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago

    An exceptional thread, no doubt.
    And hubbers are truly an excpetional lot.

  18. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between."

    Oscar Wilde

    1. 0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That's funny! wink

  19. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    Technical correction.
    It was Ralphie's younger brother Randy who got bundled up in his snow suit and his arms popped up. Same Randy who was not only allowed, but encouraged, to eat his meatloaf like a little piggy eating at the trough.
    Ralphie did suffer personal rights violation from his mom, however, by being forced to model the pink bunny outfit sent by Aunt Clara....
    Just fyi smile

    1. KFlippin profile image61
      KFlippinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for clarifying, I would never want to be responsible for misrepresenting the characters in this movie, and for sure Ralphie was sorely abused by having to put on that bunny pajama outfit, poor guy, I would have sued, truly worse than having your Mom put you in way too many warm clothes.......Cool......and yeah Clooney is aging well.

      On Fetal Rights, I must say that I think late term abortion is pure murder under any circumstance. Any sexually functioning female in this day and age is well capable of practicing safe sex or refraining from sex during her fertile days, it is not rocket science, and for sure no late term abortion has any credibility, any basis that is acceptable. 

      I raise cattle, and just this past week revived one from death after a difficult birth via my very own breath of life, he is now quite happy, even trying well hard to kick up his heels in this frigid weather, he is a gift, and not one of the pocket book............

  20. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    The War Party?
    I thought they were the Fetal Rights Rule party!

  21. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 5 years ago

    I don't think the US is better than other countries, but it is unique. I think many of us have a fierce sense of independence. Also, we're a super melting pot of cultures and ethnic groups. In my small town alone we have whites, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans. The US landscape is also extremely varied, especially when you consider Alaska and Hawaii. Heck, we still have wild horses in some of the western states and on some of the barrier islands in the East! Not better, but definitely unique.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image94
      Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      But Habee, every country has something unique about it.   Many other countries have a wide mix of ethnic groups, and a broad range of terrains from wilderness to cities.  America may have things to offer which other countries don't - but then, other countries have things which America lacks, like remnants of ancient civilizations, for instance. So America can't claim any special kudos for being unique, either.

      1. habee profile image91
        habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I think the US has more diverse ethnic groups than other nations. Immigrants helped build our country - especially the West.

        1. SiddSingh profile image61
          SiddSinghposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Respectfully disagree!

          India >>

          1.2 billion people

          18 officially recognized languages

          Number of mother tongues - probably a few hundred

          Almost all major religions represented - including about 180 million Muslims and 30 million Christians.

          Over 200 officially recognized tribes.

          And yes - we drive on the left!

          1. ediggity profile image59
            ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I disagree with your disagreement. She referred to ethnically diverse:  smile

            US = 6 or 7+ ethnic groups depending on how one classifies Hispanic and two or more races.

            US= 10 Religious Preferences

            India = 3 ethnic groups:

            India = 6 Religious Preferences

            US:

            https://www.cia.gov/library/publication … os/us.html


            Nationality:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            noun: American(s)
            adjective: American

            Ethnic groups:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            white 79.96%, black 12.85%, Asian 4.43%, Amerindian and Alaska native 0.97%, native Hawaiian and other Pacific islander 0.18%, two or more races 1.61% (July 2007 estimate)

            note: a separate listing for Hispanic is not included because the US Census Bureau considers Hispanic to mean persons of Spanish/Hispanic/Latino origin including those of Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican Republic, Spanish, and Central or South American origin living in the US who may be of any race or ethnic group (white, black, Asian, etc.); about 15.1% of the total US population is Hispanic

            Religions:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            Protestant 51.3%, Roman Catholic 23.9%, Mormon 1.7%, other Christian 1.6%, Jewish 1.7%, Buddhist 0.7%, Muslim 0.6%, other or unspecified 2.5%, unaffiliated 12.1%, none 4% (2007 est.)

            Languages:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            English 82.1%, Spanish 10.7%, other Indo-European 3.8%, Asian and Pacific island 2.7%, other 0.7% (2000 census)
            note: Hawaiian is an official language in the state of Hawaii



            India:

            https://www.cia.gov/library/publication … os/in.html

            Nationality:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.

            noun: Indian(s)
            adjective: Indian

            Ethnic groups:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            Indo-Aryan 72%, Dravidian 25%, Mongoloid and other 3% (2000)

            Religions:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            Hindu 80.5%, Muslim 13.4%, Christian 2.3%, Sikh 1.9%, other 1.8%, unspecified 0.1% (2001 census)

            Languages:
                Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
            Hindi 41%, Bengali 8.1%, Telugu 7.2%, Marathi 7%, Tamil 5.9%, Urdu 5%, Gujarati 4.5%, Kannada 3.7%, Malayalam 3.2%, Oriya 3.2%, Punjabi 2.8%, Assamese 1.3%, Maithili 1.2%, other 5.9%

            note: English enjoys the status of subsidiary official language but is the most important language for national, political, and commercial communication; Hindi is the most widely spoken language and primary tongue of 41% of the people; there are 14 other official languages: Bengali, Telugu, Marathi, Tamil, Urdu, Gujarati, Malayalam, Kannada, Oriya, Punjabi, Assamese, Kashmiri, Sindhi, and Sanskrit; Hindustani is a popular variant of Hindi/Urdu spoken widely throughout northern India but is not an official language (2001 census)

            1. habee profile image91
              habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I agree!

        2. Marisa Wright profile image94
          Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Habee, what do you think Australians came from?  We were built exactly the same way as America - the Aborigines today form a very small part of our population.

          1. habee profile image91
            habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Yeah, I thought Australia might be more diverse than the U.S., but it's 92% white and 7% Asian. Looks like it's missing the Hispanic element.

            http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/peo_e … nic-groups

            1. Mark Knowles profile image61
              Mark Knowlesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah, but they allow atheists to hold office. Which makes them a lot more diverse than you. wink

              99.9% religionists is diverse?  Dear me. Exceptional edumakashun..........

              1. 62
                C.J. Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                They are not 99.9% religionist...we just require them to list an official religion when they run! Then when they show themselves to be moraly bankrupt we use them as a moral compass! You know, "at least I'm not as bad as Bill!"big_smile

            2. Marisa Wright profile image94
              Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Sorry, Habee, I see where we're not connecting.

              Looking at that statistics site, it looks like the stats vary from country to country, depending on how that country does its reporting (Andorra, for instance, reports by nationality not race).  Being a flamenco dancer, I know there's a big Spanish community, and a big South American community, in Australia - but we never talk about a "Hispanic" community, because that would be regarded as racist in our culture.  So I suspect Australia doesn't report on them as a separate group officially, either.  They're just "white".

              Looking at nationalities, though:


              My next door neighbour is an Egyptian - the one before that was Croatian.  About a quarter of the people in my complex are Chinese. The belly dance teachers at my school are Lebanese, Greek, Brazilian and Spanish. There's nothing unusual about that - it's just an average slice of the Sydney population.  Melbourne is even more multicultural.

              Australia did get most of its people from Britain and Ireland until the end of the second world war, but then it opened its doors to European refugees of many nationalities. There was also a big influx of Vietnamese after the Vietnam war.  In more recent years, we've had a lot of immigration from China, Malaysia and the Middle Eastern countries.

              1. habee profile image91
                habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                We got a good number of Vietnamese from the war, too. If I didn't live in the U.S., I think I'd love living in Australia. Or Scotland.

                1. Marisa Wright profile image94
                  Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  LOL, Habee, then you'd be going from one land of hurricanes to another!  Have you seen the news from Cyclone Yasi today?  It was bigger than Katrina, but luckily it hit our coast BETWEEN two major cities.  There's a lot of damage to small villages, but because the numbers of people were so small, they were able to evacuate before it hit - so no casualties, we think.

                  1. 70
                    logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    I took a look at Yasi on the satellite and it was immense!  Glad to hear it did not cause extreme damage to heavily populated areas!  I feel badly for those that have had to face the continuously depressing weather related issues.  On the bright side, your temps are in the eighties and I'm hoping for a high of 24 today! smile

      2. livewithrichard profile image83
        livewithrichardposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Ahh but we do have remnants of ancient civilizations, 40,000+ years of Native American history, most of which that has been discovered is protected under our laws, and many Native American cultures survive to this day and govern nations within our nation.

        How many other countries have nations within nations?They're exceptional if they do.

    2. 0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      "In my small town alone we have whites, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans. The US landscape is also extremely varied..."

      Both the United Kingdom and South Africa would outdo America on the first point. and South Africa would outdo America on the second point...

      South Africa has 11 official languages and countless more that are spoken without been been made official. And the ethnic variations and different nationalities that live in the country is about as varied as it can be.

      1. ediggity profile image59
        ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        South Africa:

        4 Ethnic Groups.

        Ethnic groups:
            Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
        black African 79%, white 9.6%, colored 8.9%, Indian/Asian 2.5% (2001 census)


        https://www.cia.gov/library/publication … os/sf.html

        smile

        1. 0
          Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You know, Ediggity. My daddy is stronger than yours. My mummy is prettier than yours. My school is ncier than yours. My baby is cleverer than yours.

          Don't you think you're behaving like a 5 year old?

          I don't get this obsession that Americans have with their country being 'the best'. The only people who think it's the best country in the world are the generally untraveled ignorant and uneducated. Those have have a fairly high level of education and have traveled internationally know that each country has some good and some bad.

          Yes, America is the most powerful nation in the world. It spends more on arms than the entire rest of the world put together. If being part of the most warmongering nation in the world makes you proud, so be it.

          I personally enjoy the good things that America has. I also enjoyed the good things that Germany had and England had and South Africa had and Lesotho had and wherever else I've lived and worked.

          I, personally, don't have a need to prove that my daddy is better than your daddy. I don't paticularly care if your daddy is better than my daddy. However, to have to listen to this unending and innane braggadocio is unbelievably boring.

          And I guess that's why it gets my back up.

          1. ediggity profile image59
            ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            That was a great story, but we have a saying here in America.  It goes, don't hate the player, hate the game.  lol

            1. 0
              Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              @ Ediggity. I like your reply smile

              I don't hate the players. The game is 'America is the best country in the whole world because it's exceptional."

              I thought you were playing that game.

              I don't hate you. I'm pointing out the game you're playing... smile

              Good response, by the way. Wish, I'd thought of it! smile

              1. Cagsil profile image82
                Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Unfortunately, it is absence of any sort of responsibility, if you hate the game and not the player playing the game. wink

              2. ediggity profile image59
                ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Unfortunately, you're also playing the game, but you're hating on your teammates. wink

                1. 0
                  Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  @ediggity. I don't thiink America anymore an exceptional country than any other country is exceptional.

                  I also think that as I've lived and worked in many countries, I'm not speaking out of blind patriotism, etc.

                  I think all countries have some good and some bad. Some countries have more bad than good, and other countries have more good than bad. But no country is 'exceptional'.

                  If I'm hitting on my teammates, I apologize. I have no desire to do that. However, bear in mind that every time someone points out that America isn't as great as some think it is, one gets insulted.

                  1. ediggity profile image59
                    ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    What makes you think I haven't lived and worked out of many other countries, and still don't? lol

                    You just don't get it because you think you have to be a fish out of water, even when everyone invites you in.  smile

                  2. 70
                    logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    America is exceptional!  The people as a whole may not be any more so than other countries, but the country is.
                    The original governmental concept is exceptional.
                    The capitalist system is exceptional.
                    2 World Wars were won because our exceptional military kicked the enemies ass, then our exceptional taxpayers rebuilt friend and foe alike.
                    Do we have flaws, absolutely!  Do we try to improve, most assuredly!  We are constantly building on our incredible foundation.  Sometimes we stumble, sometimes we get temporarily blinded, sometimes we forget to be humble.  The bottom line is this country is where more immigrants want to migrate to, than any other.  I believe that speaks for itself.

      2. habee profile image91
        habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        The UK is 92.1% white. http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/peo_e … nic-groups

        I've never been to South Africa. Does it have glaciers, icebergs, giant redwoods, and volcanoes?

        1. John Holden profile image61
          John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Amongst those whites are Scandinavians, Eastern Europeans, French, Belgiums, Swiss, German, Australian, oh just about every white race you can name.

          In Manchester UK we have something like 90 different languages represented!

        2. 0
          Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          @habee. No, it doesn't. It has gold, coal, uranium, platinum, rich farmlands, ostrich, lions, elephants, cheetahs, diamonds, surf, sun, white beaches, desert, about seven different climate zones ranging from semi-arid, through mediterranean, oceanic, sub-tropical, etc. In terms of mineral wealth, it is one of the richest countries in the world. In terms of wild life, it's up there with the best of them.

          It doesn't have earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, or tsunamies. It does have some amazing electric storms which I always loved.

          1. habee profile image91
            habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Can I send you our hurricanes and tornadoes? We get more than our share here in the Deep South! lol

            1. 0
              Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              @ I moved to Houston, so I'm betting I'm going to see my first Hurricane at some point. I feel quite excited about that. In another life, I would have been a geologist specialising in the disaster sciences - volcanoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamies, etc. smile

    3. ediggity profile image59
      ediggityposted 5 years ago

      Looks like 54,880,000 people from other countries think America is exceptional also.  At least they thought exceptional enough to visit and spend their money here, and give the US the highest amount of visitors compared to any other country in the world!

      http://www.unwto.org/facts/eng/barometer.htm   

      August 2010 - Interim Update

      Another estimated 14 million people thought America was exceptional enough to apply for a green card:

      http://www.myusgreencard.com/faq.html

      Not to mention the never ending abundance of people who apply for citizenship in the US each year.

      The numbers don't lie folks, the US is Exceptionally Awesome! smile

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        The people who generally apply to come to America come from underdeveloped countries. It says something that Europeans generally don't come to America. Nor do Australians or New Zealanders. Yes, a few do, but they are the exceptions. The people who mostly want to come to America are those from the third world... smile

        1. ediggity profile image59
          ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Hmm, so I guess the 54,880,000 tourists, more than anywhere else in the world, come from underdeveloped countries as well.  Because they're all waiting to splurge on vacation. lol

          1. livewithrichard profile image83
            livewithrichardposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            lol lol lol

          2. 0
            Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            France has 74,2 million tourists every year. So, if you want to base the claim to American exceptionalism on tourism, then the title has to go to France. Sorry.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism

            Tell me, what is it about some of you people that you're so determined that America has to be the best. Most of you have never set foot out of this country. You're way down the list in most things but don't know it yet. You've been brainwashed by the media to think that a title that applied 40 years ago still applies.

            Why do you have to believe that America is the best in the world. Would it hurt your ego if you suddenly realized you lived in the second best country or the tenth best country?

            Can't you just enjoy the experience of being alive without having to be 'the best'?

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism

            To repeat, France has 74 million tourists....

            1. Jim Hunter profile image61
              Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              "Can't you just enjoy the experience of being alive without having to be 'the best'?"

              I could if I had to.

              But I'm American, so I don't have to..

              France is invaded by 74 Million a year?

              Well, they're used to it.

            2. ediggity profile image59
              ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Congratulations France bordered with about 5 other countries and approx 700 miles from United Kingdom!

              We're not determined America has to be the best, it just is.  smile   

              Why are you so determined to see it not be the best.  Yet, you immigrated here?  smile

              Are you a citizen of the US?

              Let me guess, are you an immigrant of French decent?

              1. John Holden profile image61
                John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Another fine example of US understanding of world geography!

                Hint, try 20 miles.

                1. ediggity profile image59
                  ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Sorry, I was referencing from Glasgow, I should have clarified. smile

                  1. John Holden profile image61
                    John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Still wrong smile

                    1. ediggity profile image59
                      ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      Sorry, it's 556.43 miles from Glasgow to Paris.  I overshot in my head estimate.  I haven't been to that side of the world in 10 years.  I think people from England still consider Scotland part of the UK? smile

                      http://www.trueknowledge.com/q/distance … glasgow_uk

              2. Mark Knowles profile image61
                Mark Knowlesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Dear me. 700 miles huh? lol

                Is 74 bigger than 54? lol

                1. ediggity profile image59
                  ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  It depends where you start out at in the UK and where you end up in France.  smile

                  1. skyfire profile image72
                    skyfireposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    lol

            3. skip55 profile image84
              skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              What is truly remarkable is that France is smaller than the state of Texas. What is also truly remarkable is the evidence of low self esteem, when it comes to Americans. If that were not the case they would not be beating the drum about how good they are, or how great they are. Americans a generally an ignorant people. And they are proud of it.

              1. ediggity profile image59
                ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Yee Haw, says the man writing this on an American website, to the individual also writing on an American website, created by ignorant Americans, who also have low self esteem, and don't care about punctuation!  lol

                1. skip55 profile image84
                  skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  What was the last great novel written in the US?

                  1. ediggity profile image59
                    ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    I don't know, ask the creator of Hub Pages.  lol

                    1. skip55 profile image84
                      skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      Your answer is exactly what so many of the responses have been. The typical US citizen has doesn't even know who its greatest authors are. Great literature tells us who we are and what we are about. The last great novel written by a US writer is probably Henry Miller's, TROPIC OF CANCER. When he finished the novel, in Paris, a friend of his said, "You might be from the US, but you have written a French novel."

                  2. habee profile image91
                    habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Too many to list. My faves are:

                    The Grapes of Wrath
                    To Kill a Mockingbird
                    The Prince of Tides
                    For Whom the Bell Tolls
                    The Old Man and the Sea
                    The Great Gatsby
                    House of the Seven Gables
                    Slaughterhouse Five
                    Invisible Man
                    As I Lay Dying
                    Deliverance
                    Catcher in the Rye
                    The Jungle
                    Call of the Wild
                    My Antonia
                    Lonesome Dove
                    Centennial
                    Chesapeake
                    Catch-22
                    From Here to Eternity
                    Sophie's Choice
                    The Great Santini
                    Beloved
                    The Color Purple
                    Ethan Frome
                    Moby Dick

                    1. skip55 profile image84
                      skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      Great list. Fantastic list. Right away, however, I would throw out anything by Hemingway, except, THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA. DELIVERANCE? THE GREAT SANTINI? I
                      I am not sure I agree with those. SOPHIE’S CHOICE. Is Styron from the US? ETHAN FROME. Now that was a great, great novel. I had forgotten about that. LONESOME DOVE. I do not know. Will read it. I don’t consider Minchner much more than a journalist. Wouldn’t exactly call his works, novels. INVISIBLE MAN. That was fantastic. FROM HERE TO ETERNITY. Any young nit wit who wants to go to war should read that before embarking on his John Wayne fantasy. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. I think that was the first serious novel I read. I think I was twelve.

                      Keep the list going. It is so rare to be able to talk books. Henry Miller, William Faulkner and Mark Twain are our best writers. Do you really consider Melville and Hawthorne US writers?

              2. ediggity profile image59
                ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                What's truly remarkable is that France is bordered by five other countries, and neighbors with the UK, yet none of those countries have nearly as much tourism.  smile

                1. skip55 profile image84
                  skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Well, they are not France, then, are they? France is Magnificent. We are paupers, and so, I think, are those other countries, by comparison. I often wonder why US people so often say the disparaging things about France that they do. Could it be envy? No one talks about the US the way France is talked about. When France is mentioned it is about wine, food, beauty, clothes. The museums, the artists, the writers, the sculptures. The list goes on. Yes, I think it is envy. We can only imagine what it must be like to be thought so highly of. That is why, I imagine, Paris is the most visited city in the world.

                  1. ediggity profile image59
                    ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Oh, yes it's Envy alright.  roll Ask how many Americans envy France and see how many laughs you get.  lol


                    So, would you say that if you saved up your vacation money, and had a choice to go to Paris or say Darfur, you would choose Paris?

                    1. Mark Knowles profile image61
                      Mark Knowlesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      I live in France, my wife is American and you have no clue what you are talking about. Sure - parochial home schooled Americans who think France is 700 miles from the UK would never consider France. But - I suspect you have probably never been out of your state let alone spent any time in Europe.

                      Dear me. sad

          3. Marisa Wright profile image94
            Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Visiting a country on vacation doesn't tell you anything about the quality of the country.  It just tells you that a lot of people are curious about the place!

            I've been to American on holiday, but I wouldn't live there if you paid me.

            1. ediggity profile image59
              ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Yes, people always spend their hard earned money on places they are just "curious" about.  Not because they think it would be a great place to visit. roll

              Well, glad to see you got a visit.  Don't worry, we weren't hoping you'd pack up and move here.  smile

              1. Marisa Wright profile image94
                Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                People think China is a "great place to visit", because of the history. Does that mean it's a great country?  People think Japan is a "great place to visit", because of the cherry blossom.  Does that mean it's a great country?

                Thanks to its size, different people will see America as a "great place to visit" for various reasons (national parks, surfing,the big cities, etc etc) but that doesn't mean it's a great place to live. 

                And I do think curiosity is a major reason for many tourists going to America, because we see so much American stuff on TV we want to know whether it reflects reality.

                1. ediggity profile image59
                  ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Different strokes for different folks.  Point being, the majority of people aren't just visiting on vacation spending their hard earned money out of "curiosity".  The average person/family isn't saving up their vacation money to visit some low quality place. Lastly, The people who visit China and Japan may very well think those are great countries.

                  1. 0
                    Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    @ediggity. Just a perspective here. It's a rite of passage for many Europeans, and countries of the Commonweath (the Old British Empire) to go see the word. We put a rucksack on our backs and go criss cross the globes. It isn't about going to fancy resorts and smart restaurants. It's about seeing what is out there. At the height of the cold war, my sister (on her own) went into the USSR on a train. She said she had never seen such poor people in her life. She also sailed down the Nile with some Egyptians. She went all over the place.  She worked, scrubbing toilets in strange places, doing what she had to do in order to see the world. Lots of us do that. It has nothing to do with 'having fun'.

                    I've been to places in Central Africa that I will never forget. I also did a lot of sailing and visited all sorts of islands. I didn't stay in fancy hotels or go there to have a good time. It was an experience that satisfied a curiosity about what was out there in the world. In Gabon, the capital city was one building. The main shopping arena were tin shanties with money beads. Perhaps, you might not consider going to a place like that because it was 'low quality' but as far as I know, that is generally not the perspective for most travelers who do the 'rite of passsage'.

                    Just this evening, my 25 year old daughter and myself were discussing her going to Singapore because she wants to go and see what it's like. She's grown up with the idea that there will come a time when she will spend  a year or so on the road. My hub about a Gap Year for Americans speaks about this. I would love to see young Americans go out and see the world. Even Prince William and Prince Harry had their 'Gap Year'. They went to Africa and Australia, to places where there was extreme poverty...

                    1. ediggity profile image59
                      ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      I'm not denying any of this.  I've traveled to many less than desirable place, not by choice.  Many of which I know for a fact few if any people are vacationing to.  Good experience?  Yes.

                      I'm referring to the majority; which is directly reflected by the statistics of The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) smile

                      http://www.unwto.org/facts/eng/barometer.htm

                    2. Marisa Wright profile image94
                      Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      Exactly. On my American holiday, the scenery was great, the service was inflexible, the souvenirs were tacky, the food was ho-hum and the coffee was awful.  That doesn't mean it was a bad holiday, because it was a learning experience and that's was the objective of the trip.

                      Brits, Europeans and Aussies travel to broaden the mind and learn about other cultures, good or bad.   You seem to think people only go on holidays to spend some time somewhere better than where they live. Maybe that's what Americans do, but it's not true for everyone.

    4. lady_love158 profile image60
      lady_love158posted 5 years ago

      America is exceptional... at least for the time being. Obviously Obama does NOT believe in American exceptionalism or he wouldn't be trying to "fundamentally transform" her into a socialist democracy.

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Deleted

        1. ediggity profile image59
          ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You're more than welcome to leave. We're not forcing anyone to stay.  Unless you're in jail awaiting trial. smile

          1. Jim Hunter profile image61
            Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            "You're more than welcome to leave."

            I would add even encouraged to leave.

            1. skip55 profile image84
              skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              This is so typical an American attitude. "Love it or leave it," isn't that the phrase? It is inane. It says Americans are happy with their lot, no matter how shabby, how rundown, how lowlife, how idiotic, which, of course, that statement is. It also speaks the Americans typically do, in cliches.

              1. 70
                logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                How about, "bite me" then?

              2. DTR0005 profile image86
                DTR0005posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Good point Skip. God forbid you have any criticism about ANYTHING concerning your own country - you will be pounced on by the Ultra-Right. So stick to the following: McDonalds is great food - the best ever! No one can touch our healthcare system - everybody else's is just crap!Americans are the smartest, best-educated, highest-paid, holders- of-the- key- to- that- bright- shining- city- on- the -hill. God bless George Washington, Jefferson Davis, Ronald Reagan, and Sarah Palin!
                God hates FA*S!!!! 
                Ok now you're safe - you'ver covered all your ground - the Right won't bother you any longer and SHAME ON YOU for having an opinion that doesn't pass conservative muster!

                1. skip55 profile image84
                  skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Thanks for that. We are a country of great freedoms and the right to speak what we choose, according to our Constitution, but not, apparently, to certain people. Thank goodness we have a Constitution to protect those of us with an opinion that does not jive with the masses. The masses are always wrong, of course.
                  By the way, I see logic,commonsense is toeing the line.

                  1. 70
                    logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    skip, you see only what you want to see.  I have gladly and proudly put my life on the line in service to this country so that you and any other here could be free to say what they want.  However if you are here to attempt to destroy this country, then I will attempt to stand in your way.  I am proud of what this country really stands for, not what the present generation of politicians make it look like.
                    Unlike you I think for myself and toe no one's line.

                    1. ediggity profile image59
                      ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                      Thank you for your service, and helping America to become more exceptional.  cool

        2. Jim Hunter profile image61
          Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Maybe you should have "arrived" without your prejudices.

        3. lady_love158 profile image60
          lady_love158posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You undoubtedly came expecting free stuff... what makes America exceptional is our self governance, which has unfortunately been eroded since FDR. But America will right itself as we have already begun defeating the socialist democrats overwhelmingly in 2010 and continuing in 2012 with the defeat of the socialist in chief, Obama!

          1. Jeff Berndt profile image89
            Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            What makes America exceptional is its ideals, which it has never--never once--fully lived up to.

            Some people have the idea that we can stop trying, and in fact should stop trying, to live up to those ideals, and that in ceasing to try, we can still claim some chimaerical exceptionalism.

            It's a mirage. There have never been a "good old days." There has never been liberty and justice for all. But we're trying, and someday, we'll get there, in spite of those who want to keep liberty and justice only for themselves.

    5. skyfire profile image72
      skyfireposted 5 years ago

      Patriotism cells reaction perhaps ? You're yet to meet fanatics from islamic countries or from asian countries. They're much more extreme than brenda,TK on topic of patriotism.

    6. Ralph Deeds profile image69
      Ralph Deedsposted 5 years ago

      "The Fantasy of American Exceptionalism," by Fred Reed

      Talking head after talking head berated Moslems, urged support for our troops, and promoted American exceptionalism, meaning that the United States, like a Tennessee revival preacher in 1925, had God-given authority – specifically to meddle everywhere in the world in the name of virtue. I kept thinking: Do these people have the foggiest idea what they are talking about?


      http://www.lewrockwell.com/reed/reed197.html

      1. 70
        logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Apparently Freddy thinks he is the only one with God-given authority and it pisses him off when some uppity peasants think their country may be exceptional.

        1. Jim Hunter profile image61
          Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          lol

      2. skip55 profile image84
        skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Ralph, you said it beautifully. The wonder is that any one of us answers and wastes our time on these inanities.

    7. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Coming back into this thread I have to chuckle at the last couple of pages worth of posts.
      1. America is exceptional because we have the most geographic diversity.
      (Are we the only country with mountains, prairies and oceans white with foam???)
      2. America is exceptional because we have the most ethnic diversity.
      (Yet we are notoriously xenophobic, keep our Native Americans contained on reservations, and the current battle cry is "kick the illegals back to Mexico" So really, are we that proud of our ethnic diversity???)
      3. America is exceptional because more tourists visit America every year than any other country.
      (LOL. When the Euro or other world currency is strong against the dollar, you betcha those tourists want to come here!)

      Boy, we're really reaching here.
      Here's mine --
      4. America is exceptional because we have more states than any other country -- we have 57! Obama told me so lol

      1. Jim Hunter profile image61
        Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        "4. America is exceptional because we have more states than any other country -- we have 57! Obama told me so"

        America is less exceptional because so many of you believed him when he said it.

        Obamablessyou.

      2. habee profile image91
        habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Sorry, MM. I have to disagree with you here. I think our diversity is wonderful. Hubby and I have had friends from all over the globe, and they've all enriched our life with their unique cultures and traditions!

        1. John Holden profile image61
          John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Yes, but does that make you exceptional?
          We have wonderful diversity here in the UK too, why is US diversity any better?

    8. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Well I still believe it! If Obama says there are 57 states there are 57 states. And by the time he leaves office in 2016 we will probably have more like 63 or even 70 states! lol

      1. Jim Hunter profile image61
        Jim Hunterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If he and the thugs think they can get away with those electoral votes there just may be.

      2. 70
        logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        His math must be rubbing off on you!  ....When he leaves office in 2013! smile

    9. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Now John,
      No one has claimed Americans are exceptional at geography -- or math lol

      1. John Holden profile image61
        John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        smilesmilesmile

    10. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Then again, we do get to claim baseball, jazz, and the Kardashian sisters. lol lol lol

      1. John Holden profile image61
        John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I thought jazz had its roots in African music?

        1. 62
          C.J. Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Uhhh....technically doesn't everything....

          1. John Holden profile image61
            John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            smile

            1. 62
              C.J. Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I thought you would appreciate that.

        2. skip55 profile image84
          skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Jazz definitely has its roots in US slavery. But, we must remember, jazz is the child of blues. The US has made three great cultural contributions to the world. Blues, baseball and the US Constitution. After that? I can't think of much of anything, if anything.

    11. 70
      logic,commonsenseposted 5 years ago

      and no one has proclaimed our public school system as exceptional.  At least not with a straight face!

    12. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Well true enough, John. Jazz does have its roots in African music.
      But you see, the exceptional colonists who founded our exceptional country were so intrigued by the African culture that they sought to "import" it to America.
      These early Americans were actually quite prescient.
      They foresaw that not only would the imported African Americans (although they would not be considered "American citizens" for quite some time)invent jazz music, they would also become basketball players, football players, Olympic runners, civil rights activists and notorious (in a good way) rap musicians!

      1. skip55 profile image84
        skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That is good. Thank you for that.

    13. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Surely you know that 700 miles = 20 kilometres.
      Everyone knows that! lol

      1. Mark Knowles profile image61
        Mark Knowlesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Silly me. I forgot I was talking to some one who got their edumakashun from the bible. lol

        Peeps can swim 700 miles where I come from. wink

    14. megs11237 profile image76
      megs11237posted 5 years ago

      While there are many exceptional qualities that America still retains; I think "exceptionalism" has become a crutch to excuse us not moving into the  future and bettering ourselves.

      We are exceptional so we do not need to contribute to a cleaner greener planet.

      We are exceptional so we do not need to treat each other better or reform healthcare.

      So on and so forth. Exceptional is an American enabler.

    15. habee profile image91
      habeeposted 5 years ago

      I've never been to the UK, John. I just know that when some of my black students went to England, they said they saw a sea of white faces. lol. My town is 32% African American.

      1. John Holden profile image61
        John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Reminds me of Clinton's visit to London when he asked a black lad what it was like, being Afro-American living in London:)

        There are places in the UK where you would see a lot more than 38% black faces, nearer 100% but that hardly proves anything does it? Certainly doesn't demonstrate American exceptionalness.

        1. 62
          C.J. Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I think it's a matter of perspective. I tend to agree with you. However Marisa just infered that diversity was an attribute of exceptionalism.....

          1. John Holden profile image61
            John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Well yes but I was answering Habee.

          2. Marisa Wright profile image94
            Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            No, that's not what I meant at all. Habee was suggesting America was exceptional because of its diversity - I was just pointing out it's not exceptional or unique in that regard, giving Australia as an example.

        2. habee profile image91
          habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I never said America was exceptional - I said it was unique. I'm largely basing this on things friends from Belgium, Spain, Mexico, Colombia, Japan, and England have told me. For example, our Japanese friends loved all the "space" we have. They said golf in Japan is an expensive luxury and that houses/apartments are very small. Our pal from Belgium was a huge fishing fan, and he said the water in his country was too polluted for fishing. My friend from Colombia was always worried about the drug lords and being kidnapped. As it turned out, his fears were not unfounded - his father was kidnapped. The Englishman we knew really enjoyed our hunting opportunities. Our Mexican pals (we have several) love the US!

          America is not "better" than other countries - it's just different.

          1. John Holden profile image61
            John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Forgive me, I was still sort of stuck on the thread title:)

          2. Marisa Wright profile image94
            Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I agree 100% Habee, but so are many other countries. People from Germany and France may look very similar, but go to the countries and you'll find big differences between them. That's why they became separate countries in the first place!

            If you went to a European country, you'd find things that are better than America, and things that are worse than America.  Everywhere has its good and bad points.

    16. habee profile image91
      habeeposted 5 years ago

      This thread has made me curious. Which country has the most immigrants? Anyone know?

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_co … on_in_2005

        I think another interesting question is which country has the happiest people? smile

        1. habee profile image91
          habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Thanks for the link. So the US has the largest number of immigrants, but not the largest % of immigrants. See - I told you we were diverse! What's sad is that not all Americans enjoy our diversity.

          1. 0
            Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            @Habee, I lived in South Africa for most of my life. Diversity, there, meant intensely different cultures. Here people might be ethnically different but most Americans have the same culture. smile

            I think the word, diversity, has many different meanings. From where I stand, I see little diversity. When I lived in London, it was thronging with Australians, Nigerians, New Zealanders, Germans, Americans, Russians, pink men with purple ears. Whatever.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demography_of_London

            In America, I see a predominantly Christian, celebrity loving, money making culture. That's it. It doesn't matter about the color of a person's skin. That's not, in my book, that gives the diversity. What gives the diversity is the strong cultural differences...

            1. Marisa Wright profile image94
              Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Actually, Sophie, Bill Bryson commented on this in his book.  America IS unique in that respect. I'll try to find the quote.

              1. 0
                Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                @ Mirisa. I have a great love for Bryson, but I, personally, do not experience any diversity in America. I see people who all have a very similar culture. I'm not allowed to put up a hub here, but there's a hub on South Africa. I don't see Indians dancing in the streets here. I just don't see it. I see most people as just the same.

                Mostly, they all talk about whatever is on Dancing with the Stars, or American Idol, or what the lastest president has said, or which is better, Democrats or Republicans. It's the same conversation wherever I go.

                So, where is the diversity?

                1. Doug Hughes profile image60
                  Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  My wife is Christian (Russian Orthodox). One of her friends, in the neighborhood, is Jewish - another is Moslem, also a neighbor. I hadn't noticed the diversity until I thought about it. Just seemed pretty normal.

    17. Cagsil profile image82
      Cagsilposted 5 years ago

      The only thing exceptional about America is the amount B.S. that comes from political offices, marketing ploys by business and the level of ignorance from the citizenship.

      Otherwise, there is nothing exceptional about America. hmm

    18. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      I don't disagree! I think our diversity is wonderful as well. My point was that I don't believe that when people (read: a small but vocal faction of the right wing) tout American "Exceptionalism" they are in any way, shape or form talking about our racial and ethnic diversity!
      The diversity discussion has arisen here on the forum.
      I think it's been fairly well proven that we (America) cannot use diversity as our claim to exceptionalism. So the search continues....

      BTW, I don't know what state you are living in, Sophia Angelique, but I take your comment about a homogenized American society seriously.

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @ Mighty Mom. I lived in California for 6 years and I've just moved to Houston, Texas. I would really like a definiation of what is meant by diversity, because I don't think it matters what color one's skin is. It's the culture that makes people diverse. smile

    19. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      I'm hoping someone else can provide a good definition of "diversity" for the purposes of this discussion.
      I agree that it is more about retaining cultural distinctiveness than about skin color.
      I live in Sacramento, which does have distinct ethnic populations that visibly maintain and celebrate their traditions.
      Chinese, Hmong, Japanese, Russian, Sikh, Korean, Vietnamese, and of course Mexican -- I'm probably missing a bunch.

      And come to think of it, I hear a lot of people complain about forms being printed in multiple languages to accommodate them or saying that everyone should learn English because they are now in America.

      So perhaps we are not as thrilled with/accepting of "diversity" as we say we are sad.

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @Mighy Mom. I loved the Chinese quarter in San Francisco. That was truly diverse! smile

    20. prettydarkhorse profile image62
      prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago

      the blending of cultures based on immigration is what makes the US diverse but not exceptional. In each country there are different ethnic culture which makes it diverse in its own sake.

      Here in America, there is a dominant culture among all the people, but there are emerging sub - cultures based on geographic differences and intermingling of immigrants and the people who are already here before they arrived.

      Mode of economy is shaping the blending of the culture which makes it a little bit homogenous. America is a top receiving country (in terms of international migration).

      Like here in Dallas, the culture is different from Memphis where I used to live. Food, accent and churches are a bit different, more Catholic churches here than there, and the food here are a both influenced by Mexican culture - Tex-mex foods. However there are all different fastfoods catering to all sorts of tastes - Chinese, taco bell, McDo, Asian store, Long john silver - fish and chips.

      The American culture in general is ACCOMODATING like AUS. It is diverse (geographic and the interactions of immigrants - local and international) yet homogenous in one sense brought about by the economic mode which shapes information technology and fashion.

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @pretty dark horse. I think that's spot on. smile

    21. habee profile image91
      habeeposted 5 years ago

      I live in a small South GA town, but even here there is cultural diversity. Maybe I see it more because I have friends from other nations. We have lots of festivals every year to celebrate this diversity. I've also attended numerous parties hosted by people from other countries, and at some, hubby and I were the only Americans in attendance. (We had to eat sashimi at a Japanese one.) I suppose I've been exposed more to other cultures than the average South Georgian because of my position as a teacher - I've taught students from all over. But it's not just diversity from people of other nations. The black culture in the South is also different, especially the Gullah-Geechee culture.

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @habee, I've met mlore people from other cultures since moving to Houston about four months ago than I did in my 6 1/2 years in California - which is strange. smile

    22. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Balzac? Shakespeare? Tolstoy? Beethoven?
      True. We don't have those dudes.
      But who else but American can claim these exceptional cultural icons:
      Paris Hilton
      The Kardashian sisters
      Snookie
      Lady GaGa
      Notorious BIG
      Snoop Dog
      OJ
      TO
      Kobe Bryant
      Michael Jordan
      Michael Jackson
      John Daly
      Joan Rivers
      Pee Wee Herman
      Tiger Woods
      Danielle Steele
      Sheldon Leonard
      Barney the Purple Dinosaur

      .... I could go on and on... and these are just the more "colorful" ones lol lol

      1. ediggity profile image59
        ediggityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thomas Edison
        Benjamin Franklin
        Thomas Jefferson
        Charles Lindbergh
        The Wright Brothers
        Ely Whitney
        Alan Shepard
        Niel Armstrong
        Edwin Hubble
        Albert Einstein
        Henry Ford

        The list goes on .......smile

        Oh yeah, you forgot Jerry smile

        1. Doug Hughes profile image60
          Doug Hughesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Snookie?

      2. megs11237 profile image76
        megs11237posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        oi vey

    23. DTR0005 profile image86
      DTR0005posted 5 years ago

      America is indeed exceptional - not necessarily better than other nations, but exceptional nonetheless... at least in a few key areas. Forty-five years ago the country was still mired in racial unrest; Civil Rights had just came into its own and the nation, at least in the South, was in a state of social upheavel. And now we have a black president. Like him or hate him, it's still pretty damn incredible considering that when I was a child, most American blacks held nothing more than menial jobs and lived as basically "second-class citizens." So the "American Dream," the ability to come from nothing and make something of yourself is still alive and well. That being said, I have seen America's education system take a nose dive; the dumming down of America is a very real and scary phenomenon.
      Compared to places I have been in Europe, I find my fellow citizens to be a bit naive, certainly sheltered, and poorly-informed in regards to world history. But we live on a continent - our closest neighbors are they themselves former colonies of European powers. We have lived largely isolated lives up until the advent of the Internet and 24/7 news channels. But on the other hand, we have, arguably, some of the finest universities in the world and these universities have helped to educate some of the most brilliant minds the world has ever known. And yes, we have an arrogant streak - there's no denying it. But we are, at the heart of things, a well-meaning and extremely generous people. So exceptional? yes, in some ways certainly, in other ways not so much...

      1. Marisa Wright profile image94
        Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I agree, that's exactly the impression I got on my visits to the States.

      2. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @ DTR0005 Nicely said.

    24. prettydarkhorse profile image62
      prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago

      I think American culture is becoming a dominant culture and is fast influencing other cultures in different parts of the world because they own most of the dominant telecommunication facilities. Other major influences are Hollywood movies, music, and dances - by which through mass media can transmit and spread American culture. There is a cultural influence and transmission even to China, they so love basketball there plus lively energetic music. America is still the number one economy in the world that is why.

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @PrettyDarkHorse. True.

    25. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Snookie from Jersey Shore.
      There is also a male equivalent on the same show.
      His name is The Situation.
      I kid you not!

    26. Flightkeeper profile image78
      Flightkeeperposted 5 years ago

      The novels of John Updike and Toni Morrison come to mind

      1. skip55 profile image84
        skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Yes. Two outstanding authors. How about James Baldwin and Richard Wright?

    27. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      The last great novel written in the United States?
      That's a no brainer!
      Love Story by Erich Segal.
      Superb book made into an even superber movie lol

      1. 0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        @1969 or 1970. "Love means never having to say you're sorry." smile

      2. uncorrectedvision profile image60
        uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Really, how about No Country for Old Men or just about anything else by Cormack McCarthy.

      3. skip55 profile image84
        skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        LOVE STORY? You have got to be kidding. Trite.

    28. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      How about In Cold Blood by Truman Capote -- if we're judging our literature by its violence quotient smile

      1. skip55 profile image84
        skip55posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        But is that a novel? A good book. But not, I think, a novel. How about WISE BLOOD, by Flannery O'Connor? Short and great.

    29. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      I can't stand Faulkner's writing. I had trouble reading those oh-so-dense paragraphs back in the day when I actually had an attention span. Couldn't even imagine it now!

      Hawthorne is definitely considered American, at least I studied him in American Lit class.

      No one has mentioned Fitzgerald -- chronicler of the flapper age.
      What about Edgar Allen Poe?

      1. habee profile image91
        habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I did mention Fitzgerald - Gatsby. Poe was much more of a poet and short story writer than a novelist. In fact, I believe he finished only one novel.

    30. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Wow, Marisa!
      That doesn't sound like a very positive tourist experience?
      But I can understand that you can't just walk into any restaurant in America and expect great food.
      Coffee -- your comment reminds me of the scene in Elf when Buddy the Elf arrives in New York and walks into a diner with a sign on the window "World's Best Cup of Coffee." He later takes his date Jobie to the same diner, blindfolds her and has her taste the coffee. And she says, "It tastes like a crappy cup of coffee."

      1. Marisa Wright profile image94
        Marisa Wrightposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Actually I enjoyed my holiday, because (like I said) the whole point of going to a foreign country is to learn about it, good or bad. 

        I am a bit spoiled at home, because you can pretty much walk into any restaurant in Sydney and expect great food - the competition is pretty intense so they have to be!  And we had a lot of Italian immigrants after WWII so nobody drinks filter coffee - we all drink espressos, cappuccinos and lattes.  Starbucks is undrinkable - did you know they make their lattes completely back to front?  I didn't find a single decent cup of coffee anywhere in California. But that's OK, I can't get a decent cup of coffee in some European countries either, funnily enough.

    31. Mighty Mom profile image92
      Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

      Next time you come to California stop by my house. I'll make you a lovely French pressed Peet's Espresso Roast....

     
    working