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Kids Shun Healthy School Lunches

  1. lady_love158 profile image60
    lady_love158posted 6 years ago

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct … 0768.story

    Sooo what's next send the government food police to force the food down their throats? Maybe the kids are just pining for some of those ribs Michelle eats! Lol

    1. AnnCee profile image71
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Wow, 1575 calories.   Hope she hit the slopes real hard.

      School lunch:http://www.healthyreader.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/ideal-lunch.jpg

      http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_LxZspW4dcfQ/SmOBbtD7BDI/AAAAAAAADYE/CSci2DV7vUg/s400/sick+emoticon.png

      Dude, pass the ribs.

      1. lady_love158 profile image60
        lady_love158posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Lol! And more than 140 grams of fat!
        http://www.food.com/recipe/coffee-brais … ile-102536

      2. kerryg profile image86
        kerrygposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Uh huh. 'Cause these look sooooo much better...

        http://i54.tinypic.com/34hzwy0.jpg

        http://i56.tinypic.com/299y8j.jpg

  2. AnnCee profile image71
    AnnCeeposted 6 years ago

    I get sick and tired of all this bs about poor  people not being able to eat nutritionally.

    I made a stir fry out of frozen mixed veg, celery, kale, three chicken thighs, soy sauce and fettucini today.  It's a whole large skillet full which will easily feed six people.  Must have cost me a total of five or six bucks.  I did add toasted sesame oil, that might be expensive, I can't remember.   I'm not poor but I get by spending very little on food.  I don't blow my food budget on prepared things like the salty frozen burritos I see in so many baskets.

    People eat poorly because they want to.  I think it has something to do with laziness in many cases.

    1. kerryg profile image86
      kerrygposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with you in essence, actually, since my cooking habits are similar to yours and I make a game of seeing which of the other people standing in line with me at the grocery store have the un-healthiest cartloads. This being one of the fattest states in the union, the winner's cart usually makes me want to vomit.

      BUT I also recognize that I live a 10 minute walk from 1 crappy grocery store and a 5-10 minute drive from 6 or 7 good ones. Not everybody is so lucky. Are you familiar with the concept of food deserts?

    2. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Perhaps with a lack of education thrown in, it's easy to think that because we can cobble a meal together from three match sticks, a lettuce leaf and a banana, every body can.
      I left home with a picture of food as something my mother prepared so I too prepared my own food, might not somebody from a home where all that is eaten are ready meals just carry on the tradition, thinking that is how food is prepared?

      1. Pandoras Box profile image68
        Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes. Sometimes people have a very narrow view of reality. Add in a touch of willing self-righteousness and it makes things difficult for them to understand.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Oh! And I thought it was just a lack of education!

      2. AnnCee profile image71
        AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        That's true.  And sad. 

        Actually my mother worked and we ate very simply.  I imitated Donna Reed, Mrs. Cleaver and some of my friends' moms to become a good housewife.  Glad to do it.   Glad to be one.  Education need not be formal.  Desire is everything.  We choose our own role models.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Oh most definitely, I was using education rather than Education to separate it from formal education.

  3. AnnCee profile image71
    AnnCeeposted 6 years ago

    I am.  They exist because companies don't want to locate in crime ridden areas.

    Another aspect of that is what some grocery companies do in terms of unloading second grade and out of date groceries in crime ridden neighborhoods.

    I feel very sorry for women and children who have to live in dangerous areas.

    One of the Fox Business network journalists, Charles Payne, a black man, has related how his early years were spent with his mother and father, a military man, living in different parts of the country and in Europe.  He had a wonderful time.   Then his parents divorced and his mother moved her kids to an poor urban area.  He was harassed and even beaten up because he didn't talk black and because he tried to get good grades.  I'm very glad that he persevered to become a successful and happy man.

    1. kerryg profile image86
      kerrygposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Just unprofitable areas, I think. Ironically enough, food deserts are also a major problem in a lot of rural areas, which don't tend to have much crime. (Other than meth, anyway.) You'd be amazed by the number of farmers who can't grow a tomato to save their lives...

      1. AnnCee profile image71
        AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        People make what they want of life.   

        I know too many people who have come out of difficult childhoods and become healthy, prosperous, intelligent, giving, successful people to believe otherwise.

        Conversely I know many people I grew up with who came from very fine families and have used all their opportunities to send themselves straight to hell the hard way.

        No government or any other entity can help people who want to fail.

        Drug and alcohol use probably has more to do with child poverty, neglect, and poor diet than we know.

  4. Dolores Monet profile image88
    Dolores Monetposted 6 years ago

    I find it odd that people want to keep the government out of school lunches. Isn't it the government that runs the schools? And as far as the food choices that children make - adults should make food choices for kids. I chose what food was on hand for my children to eat. Schools exist to educate children. Why exempt the cafeteria from the educational process?

    1. AnnCee profile image71
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Up until the Great Society took hold in the 1960's school lunches were a local issue.  Personally I had wonderful school lunches when I was a child prepared by a Hungarian grandmother who was just awesome.  I believe the schools got government "commodities" like cheese and butter.  Not sure what else.  But the preparation and menus were strictly local.

      When I was in high school things changed.  Powdered egg omelets filled with cheese product, oatmeal hamburgers, mystery tacos, rubber pizza . . .  blecchhh.

      The school kitchens went Commie. big_smile


      As far as the government running the schools, that is the real problem.  The federal government should not run the schools and the unions shouldn't be able to buy the federal government.  The schools no longer exist to educate children.   They exist as a giant trough for unions to suck off of.

      Schools used to be LOCAL.

  5. Dolores Monet profile image88
    Dolores Monetposted 6 years ago

    Preparation may have been local but the government paid for it. I don't think the nice Hungarian grandmother did it for free. And even if was local, local government is still government.

    I remember when President Reagan decreed that katsup was a vegetable.

    1. AnnCee profile image71
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Local government is not federal government.

      I remember when Bill Clinton got a bj in the oval office.

  6. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Finally, something we agree on.

    1. AnnCee profile image71
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I don't suppose there's one of us who hasn't seen this with out own eyes.

  7. Iontach profile image85
    Iontachposted 6 years ago

    I think healthy school lunches are a great idea! I know if I was still in school I'd deffo rather healthy lunches than fatty/unhealthy ones...They brought healthy lunches in the school I went to and the students are happy with that.

  8. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Yes, I agree. Given the prevalence of chemical dependency I think it would be difficult to find someone who has NOT seen it firsthand.
    You don't have to be monetarily poor to suffer the effects of parental neglect.

  9. AnnCee profile image71
    AnnCeeposted 6 years ago

    My husband and I had lunch at an elementary school recently.  Pretty sad experience.  Kids get a choice of the main menu item or a sandwich or a container of fruit yoghurt.  I think twice a week they can choose chocolate milk.  Many children choose fruit yoghurt.

    The main menu item that day was salty ham, phony potatoes au gratin, gray green beans, and really good fresh apple crisp that none of the kids at our table would touch until we encouraged them.

    Nobody tells the kids to eat and they mostly don't.

     
    The main problem we saw though was that they have very little time to eat.  The last ones in line barely sit down before the bell rings and the next group starts coming through.

 
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