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Bahrain - this is a worrying development

  1. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 6 years ago

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12729786

    Too early to say what will happen, but even under the umbrella of the GCC, (Gulf Cooperative Council), 'peace-keepers' from Saudi won't be welcome on the streets of Bahrain.

    1. pisean282311 profile image58
      pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      well it is match between iran and sauid played in bahrain..this was expected event...let us see what happens...

      1. Paraglider profile image90
        Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes and no. It's being emphasised that this is GCC, and by invitation. UAE has also sent 500 police into Bahrain. But Iran is inevitably making political capital out of it and styling it as an invasion, while the protesters themselves are calling it an occupation. time will tell.

        1. pisean282311 profile image58
          pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          well ofcourse Iran sees opportunity and it is an oppurtunity for Iran...

  2. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 6 years ago

    As an aside, every Thursday night, thousands of Saudis pour across the causeway into Bahrain where there is easy access to bars with alcohol and bar girls, both of which are banned in Saudi. But they don't come in troop transporters, just Landcruisers!

    1. pisean282311 profile image58
      pisean282311posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      lol

  3. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 6 years ago

    It's turning really ugly today. Tanks, tear gas, a few deaths and several injuries. Medical services denied to injured protesters.

    1. recommend1 profile image71
      recommend1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I guess this should be expected with such a vast wealth gap as the status quo ?

      I see in Egypt the 'revolution' appears to be in the process of being sold out as the US 'backs' a General to take over so that the pro-Amrican stance is contued.  Any news on that where you are ?

      1. Paraglider profile image90
        Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        The wealth gap or perhaps even more the opportunity gap triggers the protest. But when that is coupled with a sectarian divide (sunni/shia) between rich ruling minority and the disadvantaged majority, it's a bad formula.
        Sectarianism and tribalism are maybe the commonest excuses for barbarism. The protesters in Bahrain initially wanted political reform but were not unduly hostile to the monarchy. But this last is changing fast thanks to the disproportionate response.

        1. tonymac04 profile image87
          tonymac04posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Ruling elites seem to specialise in "disproportionate" responses. Saw some of this on our news this evening, and it is worrying. Especially appreciated the irony of Iran Deploring the "disproportionate" response - like they don't do similar things to anti-government protesters!
          Eventually the voice of the people will be heard - the question is how expensive with the ruling elites - Sunni or Shia in these cases - make it?
          Sectarianism is always bad news. Imagine a world without religion!
          Could this develop into open conflict between Saudi Arabia and Iran? That would be really bad news.

          1. Paraglider profile image90
            Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            The Saudi/Iran escalation is what everyone in the region dreads. It could engulf and/or marginalise all those states caught in between, like UAE, Oman and Qatar.

            There is something fundamentally flawed in the psyche of any person or group that wants to rule by force.

      2. weholdthesetruths profile image60
        weholdthesetruthsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        So, you're backing the Muslim Brotherhood?

        1. recommend1 profile image71
          recommend1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I back freedom of everything - including the freedom of the Egyptian people to choose what they want.  The US setting up another dictator just puts the people back where they were with the last one - Mubarak.

  4. Evan G Rogers profile image83
    Evan G Rogersposted 6 years ago

    Everything I'm hearing in the media from the locals says "we don't want foreign help".

    So... US! Stay out!

  5. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 6 years ago

    http://blogs.aljazeera.net/live/middle- … -crackdown

    This is being updated regularly. It doesn't make happy reading.

  6. prettydarkhorse profile image64
    prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago

    This is really sad news Dave. Moneyed class vs. the poor with a tinge of ethnic divide/conflict.

    1. Paraglider profile image90
      Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sadly. more than a tinge, Maita. Rather like the Catholic/Protestant divide in Ireland, it can be stirred up into real hatred by people with agendas. That is the trouble with irrational beliefs the world over. Simply because the belief is irrational, there is no way to defend it under duress, except through violence.

  7. Ralph Deeds profile image71
    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago

    Thanks for the informed comments and the aljazeera link. You should be reporting for the BBC or PBS.

  8. Ralph Deeds profile image71
    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago

    Here's another "worrying development":

    UK, France, US line up for air strikes against Gaddafi:

    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/03/17-5

    1. Paraglider profile image90
      Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      At least it would be UN sponsored with some Arab support. But the trouble with air strikes is that they rarely achieve much without a ground offensive in their wake.

      (p.s. as for reporting for BBC - they had 22 years of technical support from me, and now I'm doing something similar for Jazeera, but I'll leave the writing to the writers wink

      1. Ralph Deeds profile image71
        Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        My understanding is that the UN Security Council resolution authorized what ever is necessary to protect the rebel citizens. That presumably includes action on the ground.

        Apparently as a result of the UN action, Khadaffi called a cease fire this morning.

        "Libya's foreign minister announced an immediate cease-fire Friday, less than a day after the U.N. Security Council adopted a resolution authorizing "all necessary measures" to protect the Libyan people.

        "Foreign Minister Musa Kusa said his country is committed to accepting the terms of the U.N. resolution, a reversal from the initial defiance displayed by Moammar Gadhafi's regime."

        NPR

        1. Paraglider profile image90
          Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          He may well be trying to wrong-foot the UN by announcing this cease fire while simultaneously planning his next move. One thing is certain - he has not forgiven the protesters and if he remains in power he will take terrible revenge when he can, directly or indirectly.

          1. Paraglider profile image90
            Paragliderposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            And that proved to be the truth.

            So Libya is now an out and out war zone. Yemen carried out a massacre of protesters yesterday, and Bahrain is occupied by Saudi troops.

            This last is ironic. Notionally 'peace-keepers', they were invited in by the rulers, the very ones who had destroyed the peace by assassinating peaceful protesters. The GCC made a very wrong call there.

            The only good news from the Middle East is that Egypt's referendum on political reforms had a huge and enthusiastic turn-out.

  9. Ralph Deeds profile image71
    Ralph Deedsposted 6 years ago

    Between the Middle East, Japan's tragedy and the uncertain world economic outlook the situation looks pretty bleak from here (Michigan USA).

  10. Stacie L profile image86
    Stacie Lposted 6 years ago

    the news is very bleak lately...
    The Japanese people will have to rethink their nuclear power alternatives and perhaps not rebuild the destroyed cities..
    when are we getting out of the middle east or will this latest involvement get us into a third war?

    I'm wondering who will be in charge when Gadaffi is removed?
    will this reduce the gas prices?

 
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