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I Think I'll Incorporate and Go to Switzerland

  1. AnnCee profile image69
    AnnCeeposted 6 years ago

    #1 Once Japan's corporate tax rate goes down in April, the United States will have the the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world.


    #2 In the United States, the corporate tax rate is 35 percent.  In Ireland, it is only 12.5 percent.  Needless to say, hundreds of American companies have been moving at least some of their operations over to Ireland.


    #3 As corporations have become experts at gaming the system, their contribution to federal revenue has gone way down.  Back in the 1950s, corporate taxes accounted for about 30 percent of all federal revenue, but in 2009 corporate taxes accounted for just 6.6 percent.


    #4 Switzerland has become an extremely attractive tax haven for multinational corporations.  In fact, some cities in Switzerland do a booming business in setting up sham headquarters for foreign corporations.  For example: Zug, Switzerland is home to 26,000 people and 30,000 companies.


    #5 Transocean, the owner of the rig involved in the BP oil spill, has approximately 13,000 employees in Houston, Texas and about a dozen or so employees in Zug, Switzerland.  But by moving their "headquarters" to Zug for tax purposes, Transocean has saved about 2 billion dollars.


    #6 According to the New York Times, General Electric made a total of 14.2 billion dollars in profits last year.  So how much did they pay in taxes to the U.S. Treasury?  According to the New York Times, not one penny was paid.  However, General Electric disputes this.


    #7 Even though Boeing receives billions in federal subsidies every year and even though it has a bunch of juicy government contracts it did not pay a single penny in federal corporate income taxes from 2008 to 2010.


    #8 Exxon-Mobil paid $15 billion in taxes in 2009, but not a single penny went to the U.S. government.  Meanwhile, their CEO brought in over 29 million dollars in total compensation that year.


    #9 It is estimated that U.S. companies have approximately 1.2 trillion dollars "trapped" overseas, because they cannot bring that money back into the country without being subjected to the 35 percent corporate tax rate.  But that money certainly could go a long way towards stimulating the stagnating U.S. economy.


    #10 Sadly, the 1.2 trillion dollars that is "trapped" overseas is just the tip of the iceberg.  The largest corporations and the ultra-wealthy have turned tax avoidance into an art form.  The truth is that according to an article in Forbes magazine, there is somewhere between 15 and 20 trillion dollars in offshore bank accounts, brokerage accounts and hedge fund portfolios.  In fact, it has been estimated that a third of all the wealth in the world is held in "offshore" banks.

    http://endoftheamericandream.com/archiv … blood-boil

    1. rhamson profile image75
      rhamsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      What they couldn't hire a good tax attorney or buy a congressman like the rest?

      1. AnnCee profile image69
        AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Because it's cheaper to go offshore.  And there's a beautiful bell tower in Zug plus really good beer and schnitzel.

        And it's nice to have a vacation home abroad for entertaining pet politicians and actors.

        http://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2007/0711/zug_swtzrlnd.jpg

  2. Greek One profile image78
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    Are you going to stay in touch?

    smile

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Why break the habit of a lifetime?

  3. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    "In the United States, the corporate tax rate is 35 percent." To bad they don't pay it. Believe I saw that Japanese corps are forgoing their tax breaks due to the unfolding unmitigated disaster, that has occurred and is occurring in and around Fukushima.

    1. AnnCee profile image69
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The Japanese also have trillions offshore that could fund repairs.  Uncle Sappy will probably borrow money from the Chinese to repair Japan though.  big_smile

      1. profile image52
        ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        What do you mean?

        1. AnnCee profile image69
          AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I'm being facetious I think.

  4. profile image0
    ryankettposted 6 years ago

    I find it somewhat amusing that you would publish this tripe without verifying the fact. Here are a few of my own (not copied and pasted, straight from my actual knowledge base).

    - The EU are putting pressure on Ireland to increase their corporation tax rate, that is the cost to their country of the EU bailout. They are broke, because their tax revenues didn't meet their overheads. The EU rushed to help, but only because they want a level playing field.

    - Major US companies are NOT moving to Ireland. They simple base their European operations in Ireland. Seeing as they would probably want to base their European HQs in an English speaking country anyway, the only losers are the UK.

    - US federal tax rates actually range from 15%-35%.

    - The US has its own tax haven, Delaware, if you want the US to compete on a global level then you need to level your own playing field first.

    - Over half of US companies are incorporated in Delaware.

    - You could end up paying as little as 15% in Delaware, much LESS than most of the developed world.

    Am I the only one who sees the hypocrisy in your post? You note the tax avoidance of major corporations, and then state that you are moving to Switzerland?

    1. AnnCee profile image69
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Hey, go argue with Leslie Stahl.  http://images.zaazu.com/img/male16-male-mad-angry-smiley-emoticon-000099-medium.gif
      http://www.cbsnews/video/watch/?id=7360932n
      And where'd you get your facts from?

      I wish people with no sense of humor would avoid addressing me.  http://images.zaazu.com/img/Rain-animated-animation-rain-smiley-emoticon-000400-medium.gif

  5. Greek One profile image78
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    IF you do end up going, can you courier over some chocolates?

    1. AnnCee profile image69
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Absolut!

  6. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    "The Japanese also have trillions offshore that could fund repairs." Japan the 2nd largest holder of US dept. What happens if they stop buying US dept? What happens if the want to cash in their US dept, ie. bonds?

    1. AnnCee profile image69
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I guess Uncle Sappy will have to give them Utah and Nevada.

    2. canadawest99 profile image59
      canadawest99posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The EU is just as insolvent as the U.S.A is.  Its only a matter of time before taxes and interest rates rise there, or their currency collapses.  They have a huge unfunded entitlement system that will crumble too.   You are jumping from the frying pan into the fire.

      Come to Canada.  if you can stand a 6 month blast of winter, you will be safe and our corp taxes start at 15% I beleive and headin down.   No sovereign debt problem, solvent benefits programs, universal health care but maybe a real estate bubble though.

      1. profile image0
        ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Not every country in the EU shares a currency.

        There are 27 states in the EU, 17 which share a currency.

        Switzerland is neither an EU member state or a member of the Eurozone.

      2. Greek One profile image78
        Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        we're full

        1. profile image52
          ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Greece? Do you really think people are flocking to invest in Greece?

          1. Greek One profile image78
            Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Canada

            1. profile image52
              ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Wouldn't that make you 'Canada One'? (Sounds like a good name for a soft drink!)

              1. Greek One profile image78
                Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Hold on now.. If I have to be "Canada One", then judging by the number of your hubs, shouldn't you be 'NoStory"??  lol

                1. profile image52
                  ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  That's an excellent point.

            2. profile image52
              ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Wait a minute...Canada's full? I thought that 'mostly empty' was one of the defining characteristics of Canada.

              1. Greek One profile image78
                Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                we like our big backyards just the way there are... sans squatters

                1. profile image52
                  ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I thought the lack of plumbing up there made squatting essential.

                  1. Greek One profile image78
                    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    we just pee into the wind when it is blowing south smile

      3. AnnCee profile image69
        AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I'd move to White Rock, BC just to eat calamari at Cosmos.  Have spent quite a bit of time in Western Canada and would love to see Quebec and all the East coast.

        Your banks are more limited and more conservative in their practices than ours aren't they?  What kind of housing bubble?

        1. Greek One profile image78
          Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          got no bubble.. banks aren't allowed to do that subprime stuff like in the US

          some areas are overpriced and are due for a correction, but no bubble like in the US.

          In fact, I know of a few folks who have bought vacation property in the US to take advantage of the huge slump

          1. AnnCee profile image69
            AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I sold real estate in Washington state to lots of Canadians.  Lots of vacation cabins and homes.

            1. Greek One profile image78
              Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              with the dollar at par with the greenback and the housing crash lowing prices by so much, US vacation property is very attractive now

      4. profile image0
        ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        All of those problems listed would preceed a real estate bubble bursting. That is precisely why the US and much of Europe are having those problems.

        So what you are effectively saying is that you aren't in the sh*t yet, but it will probably be forthcoming.

  7. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    Love Canada. Meet a stranger and in 5 minutes have a friend for life. No neon, no garbage everywhere. No planes no helicopters. It is just that " 6 month blast of winter,".

  8. Cheeky Girl profile image81
    Cheeky Girlposted 6 years ago

    I noticed no one is mentioning the Caymans or the Carribean. Hooookaaay! smile

    1. AnnCee profile image69
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I get the Island crazies after about two weeks.  http://images.zaazu.com/img/crazy-crazy-mad-straight-jacket-smiley-emoticon-000187-medium.gif

    2. kephrira profile image58
      kephriraposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      That would be my choice. Why go to boring Switzerland (sorry Swiss people) when you can put your feet up somewhere warm and beautiful.

      1. profile image52
        ShortStoryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I dunno, Switzerland sounds pretty nice (if you could just clear all those europeans out of there...).

        1. AnnCee profile image69
          AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Can I get good tax breaks in Greece?   I'll go there.  Wish I was there now.

          http://www.prometheas.org/Images/greece_images/Mesohori_Karpathos_Dodecanese_Islands_Greece.jpg


          Greeks are a little surly thought.  mad

          1. Greek One profile image78
            Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Good tax breaks?

            lol.. up until a year or so ago, no one paid taxes at all

  9. lovemychris profile image81
    lovemychrisposted 6 years ago

    Gee, I don't know...you might not like living around a bunch of "anti-semites"....tsk tsk

    23/03/2011
    "GAZA, (PIC)– Swiss President Micheline Calmy-Rey has announced her country is developing a project to open up all crossings to the Gaza Strip, which has been suffocating for the last five years from an Israeli blockade.

    For his part, Lord Andrew Phillips, who headed the delegation, said world silence was to blame for Israel’s obstinacy, saying that Tel Aviv understands that silence over recent attacks has provided a green light for more attacks.

    Swiss MP Geri Müller emphasized the importance of Switzerland’s role in preserving the Geneva Convention brokered in the Swiss capital and stopping Israel from violating it."

    1. AnnCee profile image69
      AnnCeeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No way to avoid anti-Semites, lmc.  The devil spawns them everywhere, even here.

      1. lovemychris profile image81
        lovemychrisposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I agree. Even spoken of in the Bible:
        The Synagogue of Satan.

 
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