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Bin Laden Dead America Lives On

  1. theirishobserver. profile image61
    theirishobserver.posted 5 years ago

    President Barack Obama has announced that the mastermind of the September 11 attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people has been killed in Pakistan by U.S.-led forces.

    The following is the text of Mr Obama's statement to America:

    Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda, and a terrorist who's responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children.

    It was nearly 10 years ago that a bright September day was darkened by the worst attack on the American people in our history. The images of 9/11 are seared into our national memory. Hijacked planes cutting through a cloudless September sky.

    The Twin Towers collapsing to the ground. Black smoke billowing up from the Pentagon. The wreckage of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania where the actions of heroic citizens saved even more heartbreak and destruction.

    And yet we know that the worst images are those that were unseen to the world. The empty seat at the dinner table.

    Children who were forced to grow up without their mother or their father. Parents who would never know the feeling of their child's embrace.

    Nearly 3,000 citizens taken from us, leaving a gaping hole in our hearts.

    On September 11th, 2001, in our time of grief, the American people came together. We offered our neighbors a hand, and we offered the wounded our blood. We reaffirmed our ties to each other and our love of community and country.

    On that day, no matter where we came from, what god we prayed to or what race or ethnicity we were, we were united as one American family. We were also united in our resolve, to protect our nation and to -- to bring those who committed this vicious attack to justice.

    We quickly learned that the 9/11 attacks were carried out by al Qaeda, an organization headed by Osama bin Laden, which had openly declared war on the United States and was committed to killing innocents in our country and around the globe. And so we went to war against al Qaeda, to protect our citizens, our friends, and our allies.

    Over the last 10 years, thanks to the tireless and heroic work of our military and our counterterrorism professionals, we've made great strides in that effort. We've disrupted terrorist attacks and strengthened our homeland defense.

    In Afghanistan, we removed the Taliban government which had given bin Laden and al Qaeda safe haven and support. And around the globe, we worked with our friends and allies to capture or kill scores of al Qaeda terrorists including several who were a part of the 9/11 plot.

    Yet, Osama bin Laden avoided capture and escaped across the Afghan border into Pakistan. Meanwhile, al Qaeda continued to operate from along that border and operate through its affiliates across the world.

    And so shortly after taking office, I directed Leon Panetta, the director of the CIA, to make the killing or capture of bin Laden the top priority of our war against al Qaeda. Even as we continued our broader efforts to disrupt, dismantle and defeat his network.

    Then last August, after years of painstaking work by our intelligence community, I was briefed on a possible lead to bin Laden. It was far from certain. And it took many months to run this thread to ground.

    I met repeatedly with my national security team as we developed more information about the possibility that we had located bin Laden hiding within a compound deep inside Pakistan.

    And finally, last week, I determined that we had enough intelligence to take action and authorized an operation to get Osama bin Laden and bring him to justice.

    Today, at my direction, the United States launched a targeted operation against that compound in Abad Abad, Pakistan. A small team of Americans carried out the operation with extraordinary courage and capability. No Americans were harmed. They took care to avoid civilian casualties.

    After a firefight, they killed Osama bin Laden and took custody of his body.

    For over two decades, bin Laden has been al Qaeda's leader and symbol and has continued to plot attacks against our country and our friends and allies.

    The death of bin Laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation's effort to defeat al Qaeda.

    And his death does not mark the end of our effort. There's no doubt that al Qaeda will continue to pursue attacks against us. We must and we will remain vigilant at home and abroad.

    As we do, we must also reaffirm that the United States is not and never will be at war with Islam. I've made clear just as President Bush did shortly after 9/11 that our war is not against Islam. Bin laden was not a Muslim leader. He was a mass murderer of Muslims. Indeed, al Qaeda slaughtered scores of Muslims in many countries including our own.

    So his demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and human dignity. Over the years, I've repeatedly made clear that we would take action within Pakistan if we knew where bin Laden was. That is what we've done.

    But it's important to note that our counterterrorism cooperation with Pakistan helped lead us to bin Laden and the compound where he was hiding. Indeed, bin Laden had declared war against Pakistan as well and ordered attacks against the Pakistani people.

    Tonight I called President Zardari, and my team has also spoken with their Pakistani counterparts. They agree that this is a good and historic day for both of our nations. And going forward, it is essential that Pakistan continue to join us in the fight against al Qaeda and its affiliates.

    The American people did not choose this fight. It came to our shores and started with the senseless slaughter of our citizens. After nearly 10 years of service, struggle and sacrifice, we know well the costs of war.

    These efforts weigh on me every time I, as commander in chief, have to sign a letter to a family that has lost a loved one or look into the eyes of a service member who's been gravely wounded.

    So Americans understand the costs of war. Yet as a country, we will never tolerate our security being threatened, nor stand idly by when our people have been killed. We will be relentless in defense of our citizens and our friends and allies. We will be true to the values that make us who we are.

    And on nights like this one, we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al Qaeda's terror, justice has been done.

    Tonight we give thanks to the countless intelligence and counterterrorism professionals who've worked tirelessly to achieve this outcome. The American people do not see their work nor know their names, but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice.

    We give thanks for the men who carried out this operation, for they exemplify the professionalism, patriotism and unparalleled courage of those who serve our country. And they are part of a generation that has borne the heaviest share of the burden since that September day.

    Finally, let me say to the families who lost loved ones on 9/11, that we have never forgotten your loss, nor wavered in our commitment to see that we do whatever it takes to prevent another attack on our shores.

    And tonight, let us think back to the sense of unity that prevailed on 9/11. I know that it has, at times, frayed. Yet today's achievement is a testament to the greatness of our country and the determination of the American people.

    The cause of securing our country is not complete, but tonight we are once again reminded that America can do whatever we set our mind to. That is the story of our history. Whether it's the pursuit of prosperity for our people or the struggle for equality for all our citizens, our commitment to stand up for our values abroad, and our sacrifices to make the world a safer place.

    Let us remember that we can do these things not just because of wealth or power, but because of who we are, one nation under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

    Thank you. May God bless you. And may God bless the United States of America.

    1. Miss Paula profile image60
      Miss Paulaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks to are armed forces! God Bless them and there family's!!!

  2. habee profile image92
    habeeposted 5 years ago

    Good for the Obama administration!

  3. micadeolu profile image69
    micadeoluposted 5 years ago

    Hmmn, I like this soo much. At last justice has caught up with the infidel. I hope USA security is doubled. I can bet there are some hoodlums out there cursing and swearing to settle scores. What do you think?

  4. Darknlovely3436 profile image40
    Darknlovely3436posted 5 years ago

    God bless America,I am waiting to see some photo to satify my mind. However, if it cannot be done....thumbs up Mr. President.

  5. John Holden profile image60
    John Holdenposted 5 years ago

    It'll probably get me lynched but . . . pure jingoism.

    1. Karanda profile image85
      Karandaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Jingoism? I had to google it to know what you were saying. I have to agree so at least you'll have someone to hold hands with at the lynching party.

      1. John Holden profile image60
        John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Phew, thanks smile

  6. jessicab profile image61
    jessicabposted 5 years ago

    I am glad he is history.

  7. BillyDRitchie profile image60
    BillyDRitchieposted 5 years ago

    My kudos to the President for giving the authorization to take him out......but foremost to our incredible military for actually taking care of business....

    1. DTR0005 profile image85
      DTR0005posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I agree Billy - that means a lot coming from you.

  8. cheaptrick profile image75
    cheaptrickposted 5 years ago

    I'll bet within 30 minutes after that speech,some folks started writing about how Bullsh#t it was.Just the first major move toward reelection.Osama was buried at sea-hope they got a verifiable photo of that.I want to believe,I really do.But after the BS that's been floating around,I gotta with hold my enthusiasm.BTW,that speech could have come right from the pages of Mien Kampf.Read it closely...I am not affiliated with any party nor am I a conspiracy nut.I just don't like the big picture here.

    1. Disturbia profile image61
      Disturbiaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I think the president's speech was all find and good, but I hate to say it... the buried at sea thing just stinks to me.  I'm afraid I will always be saying "show me the body."  Bin Laden seems to me like the type of scum who's body you'd want to see dragged through the streets and hung up on public display for several weeks.

  9. Greek One profile image79
    Greek Oneposted 5 years ago

    Thankfully, you are free to say what you want without getting lynched.

    ..and the thanks for that, in no small part, goes to the brave people who risk their lives to take out folks like Bin Laden

    1. canadawest99 profile image59
      canadawest99posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Great, now they can focus their efforts on the wall street terrorists who did more damage to the world than bin laden ever could do.

      1. Greek One profile image79
        Greek Oneposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If crimes were committed, then the criminals should be brought to justice... but I wouldn't equate the financial activities of wall street executives to the mass murder of thousands of innocent people

        1. canadawest99 profile image59
          canadawest99posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I would argue that financial terrorism is worse.  It affect everyone and has life and death consequences as well. The riots in egypt and libya are about food prices and jobs, not democracy.

  10. Stevennix2001 profile image83
    Stevennix2001posted 5 years ago

    Although I think for the short term this is a great victory, as it can finally put the minds of those effected by 9/11 to rest knowing that the man responsible has been brought to some form of justice.  However, I think the bigger question that I have, and I think everyone else should be asking as well, what does this mean long term wise?  does this mean that the war on terror is over?  If so, are we going to start pulling troops out of Afghanistan and Pakistan now?  I know we can't for Iraq for obvious reasons, but what about the other two places I just mentioned?  What's going to happen now?  Now, those are the questions I really want to know, as I think the events that the O'Bama administrations makes after this bit of news will have even bigger impact on this country.

  11. theirishobserver. profile image61
    theirishobserver.posted 5 years ago

    Has the truth been buried with Bin Laden at Sea smile

  12. McLaren 83 profile image59
    McLaren 83posted 5 years ago

    He should have been taken alive and made to pay for what he did! Killing him was too kind.