jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (37 posts)

Why do most want Dreams Homes they can’t have?

  1. Castlepaloma profile image23
    Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago

    We know the rich own most of the good land;and the banks own much of the homes you live in. About 96% of the first time home buyers can’t really afford a house. About 80% of people have dissatisfied jobs, trying to keep up with their bills. When a person buys an average house within the house life span. It's more likely the house mortgage will be marked up 150% over the price the house and the running home cost will be more than the price of the house too.

    In the end, it’s most likely the house owns you and still North America, per capita, leaves the largest carbon foot print on the face of the earth. North Americains are approaching 90 millions baby boomers and immigrants are incoming fast. Most People struggle over rentals and our society is in for the longest monetary emergency ever...

    For at least for about 50% of us are single head of household. I can build a tiny House and its made mostly made out of paper Crete. They can have their homes paid for within 10 years, because there are no interest rates, or mortgage. and running cost are less is than 1/10. It’s cute and cozy homes have become much more profitable for the owner. Very low tax and insurance. With No Down payments It’s Organized well for tiny appliances and pull-out furniture.

    Not trying selling you one, just wondering, I have only one person who has bought one. The average single person can live in a 100 sq.ft. And move on up to 300 sq ft’ place. Then go beyond.

    With too many over size homes and credit cards that most people cannot afford. May I ask, do North Americans really prefer to suffer life and depend on the American dream they can’t afford than to keep it simple living in a tiny house?

    1. AnnCee profile image78
      AnnCeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I sold real estate and I can tell you that many people become willing slaves to image.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image23
        Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That's a good idea,

        I could make Tiny Houses more dazzling and baffling not so much all the healthy parts about it.

        That remind me of the potatoe commerical , where the father tells his daughter the potato is a vegetable, so she cries and leaves the dinner table and then he eats her potato

        1. Disturbia profile image61
          Disturbiaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I don't know where you live, but here in the USA, there is no profit in building smaller homes, or at least that was the case before the real estate bubble burst.  People want the biggest bang for the buck.  A modest home would be approximately 2,000 sq ft. with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths.  But the size of the home really depends on it's location.

          1. John Holden profile image60
            John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Gulp! My modest home is about an eighth of that, and I've lived in a lot smaller!
            I did, for about six months live in a fourteen feet by six six caravan with partner.  It was great, mind you we had almost unlimited out door space which we spent most of our waking hours in.

          2. Castlepaloma profile image23
            Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Disturbia

            It's sad that 2/3thirds of American can't afford a house. Yes, an average house is 2,200 square ft.

            Is a dream too far out of whack to think our gross national produce is happiness, health and natural environment, first, rather than the dollar first. I like to think we are environment organisms first rather than gold bar pretending to be sitting in the bank somewhere.

            I live parting in Belize where every citizen is granted free land. If we did that here, how many of us here would be homeless, we do have the land. Imagine changing the bylaws to smaller down size homes so most of us can afford one.

        2. AnnCee profile image78
          AnnCeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You have to stress the COOL GREEN factor, cp.  I myself don't buy it, but many people obviously do.  Take a look at advertising concepts used for  the Smart car.

          http://www.unusual-travel-destinations. … s-box.html

          http://www.unusual-travel-destinations.com/images/Moormanns_Shed.jpg

          http://mocoloco.com/upload/2009/11/walden_tool_she/walden_tool_shed_nils_holger_moorman.jpg

          http://www.unusual-travel-destinations.com/images/Walden_Garden_Shed.jpg

          Lars Holger Moorman's Shed.

    2. Mister Veritis profile image61
      Mister Veritisposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I think the federal government owns most of the good land. It is about time for the feds to give it up. Privatize the land and let's put it to good use.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image23
        Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        They may sell much of it, to pay off the dealt

        1. Mister Veritis profile image61
          Mister Veritisposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          That would be a good thing.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image23
            Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            it maybe the only thing, if there is no big turn around

  2. AnnCee profile image78
    AnnCeeposted 5 years ago

    I was hoping you had a Hub about your tiny houses.   I've seen some of those and I think it is a marvelous idea.

    Have you ever seen the little garden cottages at community gardens in Germany?  So very charming.

    I lived in a very tiny cabin for a time when I was young and found the experience to be wonderful.  You can make a small space into a little jewel box.


    I'm not having much luck finding photos of the garden cottages I'm talking about.  They are tiny, quaint and whimsically decorated in brilliant colors.  They are more or less garden sheds where the people come to work and picnic. 


    Found this one but it's not a prime example.

    http://www.dw-world.de/image/0,,994696_1,00.jpg

    Better one.

    http://www.paines.org/photos/travel/paris/germany-15.jpg

  3. AnnCee profile image78
    AnnCeeposted 5 years ago

    Wow found this, you'll love it, CP!  http://www.unusual-travel-destinations.com/pandoras-box.html

  4. AnnCee profile image78
    AnnCeeposted 5 years ago

    I've often thought when I see homeless people camped that it would be a good idea for a city to use public land and put up a camp of very small simple dwellings that could literally be hosed out.  They could be rented for a minimum amount of money to those who met certain requirements.  As it is I've seen homeless housed in empty stores that were donated for that purpose and in old motels.  Nothing is ever ideal.

    I lived also in a one room cabin in Alaska for a year.   Also a great experience.  It's wonderful to live simply.  It feels good.  Actually less stress.

  5. AnnCee profile image78
    AnnCeeposted 5 years ago

    I think I'll have to write a hub about allotment gardens.  This garden shed/house is from Sweden.

    http://www.visitedeurope.com/UserFiles/2009/4/6/Swedish%20Allotment%20Gardens.jpg

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Inspired by Neil Young's A Man Needs a Maid came
      "I was thinking that maybe I'd get a shed,
      find somewhere nearby for it to sit,
      just a place to keep my tools dry
      Keep my bike in and go away.

      A maaa aaan needs a shed"

      On from that developed the shed web site which never saw the light of day, but it was brilliant.

      You can only live in one room at a time.

      1. AnnCee profile image78
        AnnCeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Did you write that, John?  Brilliant.

    2. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I like that one

  6. AnnCee profile image78
    AnnCeeposted 5 years ago

    Hey John, have you been to the Chelsea Flower Show?   I'd love to go sometime.  Kind of a long trip for me.

    http://www.beloblog.com/ProJo_Blogs/garden/07/chelsea2.jpg

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      No, I've never been to the Chelsea Flower Show. Been to the Hampton Court Flower Show but really I like the smaller local shows best.
      They are far less pretentious and much more realistic.
      I did visit an open garden once and got into a long and intense conversation with somebody who I thought was probably a retired gent turned gardener.
      He kept pulling up bit of plant and stuffing them in my pockets.
      Eventually a posh bloke sidled up and said "excuse me your lordship. . ."

      1. AnnCee profile image78
        AnnCeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Blimey!!  Hyacinth Bucket would have been over the moon.  big_smile

        Look at this one

        http://worldhousedesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Viennas-Schafberg-Garden-House.jpg

        http://www.tangram3ds.com/projects/czart/

        http://www.efficient.ws/johann-schafber … 010/02/08/

        1. DannyMaio profile image60
          DannyMaioposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          That is absolutely Beautiful! Not small though

        2. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Love the way the pool is above ground level and the steps don't actually go down lol

          1. AnnCee profile image78
            AnnCeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            There are more shots at the link.   The pool shadows are strange in that photo.  Pool starts extremely shallow.

  7. AnnCee profile image78
    AnnCeeposted 5 years ago

    Did you take a look at that modern German shed with living quarters?  Link above, the one I said you'd love.   It is so-o-o cool!

    By the way, cp, thanks for this thread, very fun.  And I agree with you.  It would be wonderful if more people could own. 

    Think about all the storage companies there are though.  Even with big houses so many people need storage units for extra "stuff."

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      When see the size of these storage companies and the people handleing their stuff more than four times without using it, you can feel a sense of  waste. That's not all Canada per capita has the largest landfill sites in the world too.

      An adverage house is ten times more toxic inside than being outside.  There are 30 cars for every bike in Vancouver, in Denmark there are 30 bikes for every car. Vancouver mayor wants to make our city the greenest city in the world. I would love to see that manifested,maybe he is not counting the eco gettos in the third world.

  8. kafsoa profile image77
    kafsoaposted 5 years ago

    It's human nature, People always are looking for what they don't have. May be it's the target theory:)

  9. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 5 years ago

    The thoughts of a Dream Home is hope. It only becomes hopeless when the person chooses to not put any effort toward getting it. smile

    1. Disturbia profile image61
      Disturbiaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That's very profound Cags, but you always do say the most interesting things in the most articulate ways.

  10. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 5 years ago

    usually people want they they cannot have...and when they finally do get it, they are still unhappy.
    i wrote about downsizing. One can live happily with less if they have the right mindset.wink

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Be careful what you wish for and how you approuch your dreams.Make a dream big enough that is matters and small enough to handle it.

      The wish fish story, is interesting. A fish gave her all the wishes she wanted and she took a trip and made many outstanding wishes come true.

      Then She was not happy, so for her last wish, she wished to turn herself back to A poor fishman's wife,

      The end

  11. Corrie Lamprecht profile image79
    Corrie Lamprechtposted 5 years ago

    I am so happy with my small house in Thailand.  Have more land left for garden; our collection of fish ponds, orchids and ferns.  Most important of all is that I do not owe anybody.  No rent, no bank loans and no stress on those days income is small.  I tis not fancy nor big.  Have one room with bathroom and another room as office/shop and business.  I sleep peacfully and are happy for my small home when I hear other people stressing about mortage payments.  After all - this is so easy and quick to clean out too - giving us more time to LIVE!  It is not because I can't afford a bigger 'better' place; but I have been there!

    Those big houses and expensive properties; low experience in life, rush and push through everyday full of stress . . . others are welcome to it.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Corrie Lamprecht

      I love to hear success stories about people who are happy for what they have, rather than what they don't have. Wow, No stress over rent, banks unwanted junk. And mortgage payments. 

      Best thing of all, it's giving you more time to live it up and go after many of your other dreams rather than making your home a hassle, I mean a Castle.

      1. Disturbia profile image61
        Disturbiaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Well I'm happy with my dream home and I plan to live in it for the rest of my life and the only way I will ever leave it is in a body bag.

        1. Castlepaloma profile image23
          Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I would give up my kingdom for my life. I could always build another small Castle more beautiful and better than the one before.

          I often do build sandcastle for a living, some of them I actually move in and live in them, by adding some cement.

          1. Disturbia profile image61
            Disturbiaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            My castle is not made of sand, it's a 150 year old farm house that has had several renovations over the years and according to my girls it's own ghost... lol, which I don't believe but if it makes them happy to believe, who am I to burst their BOO bubble?   The house when I bought it stood on 3 acres, but I have since been able to aquire the surround 4 lots which equal a total of 50 acres because of the terrible real estate situation here now.  This was all land which originally belonged to the farm but was sold off over the years by the family.  Both my girls like to ride so I plan to build a new stable this summer, and maybe even an indoor arena.  I love my home.  I have my sunroom, my pool, my gardens, it's my own little world and I feel like I'm in heaven here.  That's why people want the "dream home" so they can have that feeling of being in their special place where the outside world can't intrude.

            1. Castlepaloma profile image23
              Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I rented an old haunted house like that in the 80s, did not know until I moved in it was owned by my great great grand uncle. I did not surly believed in ghost until I saw a 10 year boy ghost walking the halls.

              Many American houses have dropped sadly in prices and in Canada it’s more about the credit card dealt. I know of other people who managed to get back their original land like in your situation in court too. Lucky you that you love your place and own it, in which many do not

 
working