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Man gets arrested at airport for wearing baggy pants

  1. Stevennix2001 profile image83
    Stevennix2001posted 5 years ago

    Okay, I understand that airport security had to get a lot more tougher since the horrific aftermath of 9/11, but this is just plain ridiculous.  Seriously, how is a guy that wears baggy pants a threat to national security?  That doesn't make any sense.  Oh well.  Anyways, here's the link for you guys to check out, as I thought it was interesting to read.  Kind of sad if you ask me. hmm

    http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/b … aaf-wp2673

    1. tony0724 profile image59
      tony0724posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Technically the guy did nothing wrong. However I am sure no passenger needs to be exposed to what boxers or briefs some self centered and quite frankly over coddled punk decides to wear. This is not an issue about law really, this is about common decency and for anybody to defend this kid indicates to me how far we have lowered the bar for acceptable and decent behavior in our society. I side with the personnel on the plane who decided to remove him.

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Not so.  The guy refused to comply with the airlines dress code, which is rather stupid in this case; pull up his pants and it's fixed.

        He then compounded the problem by refusing to leave the plane, as if he owned it.  When security showed up to remove him he resisted with force. 

        He was actually charged not with baggy pants but with trespassing, battery and resisting arrest.  All are wrong in the eyes of the law.

        1. pylos26 profile image75
          pylos26posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          that should heist his pants a bit.

  2. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    People seem unaware of the fact, but airlines often have dress codes.  Any business can have a dress code and ask people to comply or leave.  It seems he refused to do either and so got arrested. 

    Is it noble to be arrested to defend your right to wear your trousers at groin level? (not just a little low, but all the level of his junk).  Maybe, maybe not.

  3. profile image0
    nikashi_designsposted 5 years ago

    I see nothing wrong with this. People travel and have to put up with security, stress, business, and children. The airport acted accordingly. There is a time and place to walk around with your pants down and your underwear showing (I just can't think of when,butt...). You should act like a human being sometimes. As mentioned by psycheskinner, dress codes play a part. You don't know the whole story, yes, he was coming from a funeral or something...sorry about but, doesn't change the fact that he was not dressed properly.

    1. Evan G Rogers profile image82
      Evan G Rogersposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      since when the hell is there a dress code for "going somewhere on an airplane"

      This whole TSA crap is really getting out of hand.

      Demand freedom, not security.

      1. uncorrectedvision profile image61
        uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If I own the plane am I not entitled to determine who gets to fly on my plane and who does not or are my rights secondary?

        If someone boards my plane and I do not want to fly them, refund their ticket price and ask them to leave but they do not am I with in my rights to ask that they be removed by force?

        If someone breaks into my business are they violating my rights?  If someone is in my business I do not want there and refuses to leave are they violating my rights?

        This man was not wanted on a private aircraft and refused to leave when asked.  Sounds like he was violating the private property rights of the owner.  If one violates the rights of a property owner isn't that a crime?

        Perhaps we should return to those good old days of anarchy like Vegas in the 60s or Deadwood in the 1870s.  If a man violates your property he is in for a killing or a beating depends on the magnanimity of the property owner and whether the property was a horse.  Oh, boy anarchy would be awesome.

        1. Evan G Rogers profile image82
          Evan G Rogersposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Sorry, the TSA doesn't own the planes.

          NEXT!

          1. Greg Sage profile image61
            Greg Sageposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Since when?  Always has been.  I've seen this exact situation unfold at an airport before.  That individual stopped exposing his underwear to the 6 year old twins sitting in the seat next to him, and it was the end of the story.  I've also seen it many other places... The mall near my house has security guards who are instructed among other things to throw anyone exposing their underwear out of the mall.

            General decency an respect for your fellow man aside, perhaps you do not live in an area where gang violence is a problem.  in my high school, there were metal detectors at all the doors, and sagging pants, colored bandanas, the flashing of gang signs, or any other flags were terms for suspension.  During my first homecoming dance, I saw someone 10 feet in front of me get shot.  After one gang member was ejected, 6 of his baggy-pantsed friends came to a football game, and beat up the school officer.  From then on, we had 2 full-time cops assigned to the school.

            I grew up in the suburbs in one of the highest rated public school systems in America.

            You don't appear to have read the story.  You seem to be under the misconception that this is the TSA.  There is no indication they were even involved.

          2. psycheskinner profile image81
            psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            TSA wasn't involved in this story.

            NEXT.

            Also they requested that he raise his pants from a position that was described as 'below his buttocks and above his knees'.  Even taking into account fashion, I think one's pants should cover one's genitals.

            1. I am DB Cooper profile image67
              I am DB Cooperposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Exactly. An airline employee asked him to pull up his pants. He refused, so the airline contacted authorities. If you don't abide by a simple dress code and you refuse to leave a private business when asked, you can expect to be picked up by authorities for trespassing. This is not an "overreaching TSA story", although there are plenty of them out there.

          3. uncorrectedvision profile image61
            uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            This was not a case of government intrusion.
            next?

  4. Stevennix2001 profile image83
    Stevennix2001posted 5 years ago

    Yeah, you guys do bring up a valid point there.  I just thought the news was interesting to read, as you don't hear about too many cases like this happening.

  5. My Stories profile image60
    My Storiesposted 5 years ago

    I think arresting him went too far. I heard about it on tv. How many of us look put together when we travel?  I think it is not right. If you don't look "the standard" look you could get arrested? What if a muslim woman wears a burka, will they arrest her because she doesn't fit the standard look? Will they arrest a girl because her pants are too tight? It's crazy. Unless people are doing something crazy and causing problems at the airport, let them travel.

    1. I am DB Cooper profile image67
      I am DB Cooperposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      He was given multiple opportunities to comply with a dress code that can only be described as very lenient. Basically, just don't expose all of your boxers and you're good. It's not like they were asking him to put on a dress shirt and tie, which happens to be how men used to travel in airplanes, as it was seen as a special occasion worthy of one's "Sunday best clothes".

  6. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    I agree with My Stories.

    I abhor the baggy pants trend, but if that was the guy's only offense, I don't see how it was arrest worthy.

    1. dutchman1951 profile image61
      dutchman1951posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      sounds like a cultural gap comming to life, on both sides. He did not deserve to be arested at all, no basis for the actions.

    2. jponiato profile image83
      jponiatoposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      He wasn't arrested for baggy pants.  The airline's dress code gives them the right to insist passengers pull up their pants or get off their plane.  He was arrested for not getting off the plane, and for physically resisting the airline personnel who tried to insist.  I think on that basis the actions were merited.

  7. platinumOwl4 profile image42
    platinumOwl4posted 5 years ago

    This is exactly how it started once before. The so called freedoms we once enjoyed are eroding by the day while we stare in awe of mindless nothingness. Look!! how many government officials have exposed themselves yet no arrest. Congressman Wiener is just a recent case he will retire with a million dollars of the tax payers money, no arrest.

  8. Greg Sage profile image61
    Greg Sageposted 5 years ago

    Am I the only one that just can't help but hear the "pants on the ground song?"

  9. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    A private company has rights too, including the right to refuse a person service if they don't comply with the dress code.

    Dude was arrested because he did not respect the right of the company to refuse him service, he wouldn't leave the plane.

    1. Greg Sage profile image61
      Greg Sageposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Well, let's see.  I've been kicked out of a restaurant for having flip-flops.  My other half has been barred for having on a bikini top on our way back from the beach.  My brother was once kicked out of somewhere or other for having a provocative T-shirt.

      Difference between those stories and this one: 

      1  None of us had the ability to just fix it and move on.  He did

      2  None of us refused to comply or disrespected the company.

      3  Battery.  'Nuff said.

      4  Inevitable race card

      Pretty much the only differences from our experiences and his are HIS behavior... and his mother's insistence on blaming racism rather than recognizing all of the above.   I can see teaching him responsibility for his actions didn't come from her.

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Well said.  The problem is not the airport, the airline or security.  It is a young punk with a chip on his shoulder that insists he can do whatever he wants whenever and wherever he wants.  And Mom certainly didn't help, either now or during his upbringing.

  10. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    And the entire incident, from beginning to end, in no way whatsoever involved the TSA.

    I have also been turned away by companies for dress (bar/jeans, supermarket/bare feet).  It doesn't need to be a big deal.

  11. My Stories profile image60
    My Storiesposted 5 years ago

    Greg..lol Now that song is in my head.

  12. Greg Sage profile image61
    Greg Sageposted 5 years ago

    Perhaps the greatest irony is that this ridiculous "fashion trend" that caught on nationwide as the result of a few popular rap videos back in the day actually has it's roots in prison.

    A partial result the prohibition of belts in prison, the often ill-fitting clothes tended to sag.  For those who only understand this part of their fashion choice's history, the stated intent is to either identify one's self as a gang member once outside, or at least to give the impression one has been to prison.  It is specifically those who have spent time on the inside wishing to make that known on the outside who have pioneered this trend.

    Many of today's criminal wannabe's, however, seem quite ignorant of the other part of the history lesson.  While the baggy pants and general sag of the attire are gang hallmarks, the wearing of the pants down to the point of exposing one's boxers is NOT simply the implication of a prison affiliation.  This trend is well documented as an advertisement within the prison community of homosexual "availability."

    It looks like our modern-day freedom fighter might just get a crash course in this history lesson.  Pretty sure he'll pull them up then.

    1. platinumOwl4 profile image42
      platinumOwl4posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      One other fact about this style, the clothing have deliberately mis-marked  the labels on their clothing to cause people to purchase the wrong size. One other unknown in this style from prison showing the but crack is the new cleavage.

 
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