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Is a healthy public school system critical to America's future?

  1. kashannkilson profile image59
    kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago

    Are public schools still important? Are charter schools and privatization the future?  Does it even affect the country's role in the world economy?

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      They're not only important, yes they are critical.  They are a great equalizer and balancer of our society. Privatization will separate and divide; and divisions of that magnitude affect everything, laws, morale, morality, jobs, economy, everything.

      1. John Holden profile image60
        John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Blimey, it had to happen one day I suppose.
        Something on which we are in agreement.

        1. profile image0
          Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          lol
          I'm just as shocked as you are!

      2. rebekahELLE profile image91
        rebekahELLEposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        +

        Having worked in both systems, I am in agreement with your thoughts.
        Private schools serve their purpose as do public school systems. Despite the press public school education receives, one can get a decent education in schools across the country. Schools must work together with their communities in order to excel.
        Parents and businesses need to collectively work together. I have seen this in both sectors.

        Margaret Wheatley wrote years ago about what we can do to make our schools better.
        She has books on the subject as well. Here is an article about how to bring schools back to life. http://margaretwheatley.com/articles/lifetoschools.html

        Schools work on budgets, and it affects everything from the quality of resources to the quality of teachers. Then you get these bozo governors and politicians in Congress who want to slash education funding.

  2. Evan G Rogers profile image82
    Evan G Rogersposted 5 years ago

    Public schools do not need to exist. They serve a function, but are still generally a waste of money.

    The private system could do a better job.

    1. kashannkilson profile image59
      kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for posting. I'm terribly curious about the draw of privatizing schools, and admittedly, I'm a bit in the dark to the arguments for making that move.

      Do you mean that privatizing schools would be cheaper or that the quality of education would be better or both?

      I get that with a voucher system, the government cuts checks to private schools and then subsequently doesn't have to worry about paying the day to day costs of X number of buildings, staff, insurance, services, etc

      But then don' t the private schools subsequently have to pay for all that and still have black ink on the books at the end of the year?

      I guess my question is what do the private schools do more efficiently (cheaper) than public schools?

    2. Repairguy47 profile image60
      Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      And does a better job.

      1. kashannkilson profile image59
        kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        But how? What exactly makes the privatized system better than public schools?

        1. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          To begin with they are not saddled with having to hire incompetent teachers because they happen to belong to a union. They can hire the best and the brightest available. They do not have to teach classes designed to indoctrinate instead of pass along knowledge. They do not have to accept students that have a history of troublesome behavior. The public school system is a mess and will be as long as the intent is to mold young minds into good little democrat cheerleaders.

          1. TMMason profile image72
            TMMasonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Exactly.

            Social engeneering.

    3. Paul Wingert profile image79
      Paul Wingertposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Okay Mr Rogers, if public schools don't need to exist, who's going to pay for private schools?

      1. Repairguy47 profile image60
        Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Those attending, who did you think?

        1. kashannkilson profile image59
          kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          So the families would to pay to send their kids to school?

          1. Repairguy47 profile image60
            Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Yes, that is what is meant by private as opposed to public.

            1. kashannkilson profile image59
              kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I understand the difference between private and public. What I don't understand is why  didn't you send your kids to private school if you are so in favor of it?

              1. Repairguy47 profile image60
                Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I wound up doing just that.

                1. kashannkilson profile image59
                  kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Fair enough. So it sounds like you found private school offered your kids the best path, and I can certainly respect that.

                  That being said, what about the people who aren't fortunate enough to have the ability to pay tuition and all that? Or the folks that have their kids in a private school and lose their jobs?

                  What happens to those kids if there are no public schools? Do you think there should be any kind of fail-safe for the good kids that want to learn but have families that can't cut the check?

                  1. Repairguy47 profile image60
                    Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Public schools can be good if they did away with the teachers unions, the NEA, and all those things that make them crappy. It doesn't have to be the way that it is.

  3. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 5 years ago

    Public schools are extremely important! As a retired public high school teacher, I saw the advantages of public education on a daily basis. It's not just about the core classes, either. It's also about all the other opportunities available to kids.

    Could public schools be improved? Certainly! But they don't need to be eliminated.

    1. kashannkilson profile image59
      kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for the response habee. So as someone with experience doing the job, what do you think needs to be improved? What would you change?

      1. habee profile image91
        habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        1. more parental involvement
        2. more student responsibility
        3. more GOOD teachers
        4. get rid of cookie-cutter curriculum
        5. prepare students more for life - not just for college

        1. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          When my youngest child started kindergarten (her last time attending a public school) my wife and I were told that no parents could sit in with their kids. They don't want parent involvement until the child becomes a problem then all they want is permission to drug them.

        2. kashannkilson profile image59
          kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I think if we could solve your first point we'd be a long way towards success. When I was in school  parents seemed to be involved- I don't see a lot of that now.

          This standardized curriculum is weird to me. I'm not a teacher, but I do a lot of training, and people just don't all learn the same way. Some folks respond better to reading, some to verbal, and some textile. When I was in school, I had teachers that would factor that in to what they taught- I don't see that happening now.

  4. TMMason profile image72
    TMMasonposted 5 years ago

    Yes they are important and needed.

    But we have to get rid of the Teachers Unions, NEA, AAUP, etc... and the Liberal Progressive Secular Humanist agendas that saturate the entire span of education.

    Get rid of the Social Engineering agendas and put real education back in place.

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      And get those reds out from under your bed!

      1. TMMason profile image72
        TMMasonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Ah you're so funny...

      2. Repairguy47 profile image60
        Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Do you ever have any thing useful to say?

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Frequently, but I find the best response to nonsense is more nonsense.

          1. TMMason profile image72
            TMMasonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            If you do not know or think the schools are used for Social Engineering, then you nothing of the real world, John.

            It was your own Socialist kith and kin of the frankfurt School who first laid the theory out and engineered plans for the implimetantion, along with "critical theory" and many other destructive ideas.

            http://www.catholicinsight.com/online/f … _882.shtml

            Social Engineering has been embraced by the American left since the days of the ejection of thier ilk from hilter's germany. they were taken in by Columbia Univ. and they and thier scheming were injected like a poison into our education system. Since that time they have destroyed this country with their twisted agendas and desires to over-throw this country and our ways.

            Like a poison... what else do you expect from any Marxian ideologies or useful idiot followers.

            Sad.

            But we are taking our education system back, among all other things. Soon we will toss the bums out on thier ears.

            Stalin said it best... "America is like a healthy body and its resistance is threefold: its patriotism, its morality, and its spiritual life. If we can undermine these three areas, America will collapse from within."

            the frankfurt School knew this... and have done all they can to make sure they attack and weaken every one of the 3, plus all else in our society.

            Sad.

  5. rebekahELLE profile image91
    rebekahELLEposted 5 years ago

    .. you have taught in the public schools? You are an educator?  You have spent full days, 5 days a week in the classroom with public school children?

    1. Repairguy47 profile image60
      Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I have been the parent of 5 who went at one time or another through the public school system, I have been through the public school system. One does not have to be an educator (used loosely) to have knowledge about schools.

      1. rebekahELLE profile image91
        rebekahELLEposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I will agree that not all educators are 'educators', (which can be applied to any profession), but your statement is an opinion. If that's what you feel is the purpose of public education, that is what you choose to see, but it's certainly not factual. Maybe it's different in Texas. I know they like to play around with the textbooks to fit their political ideology. Public school children often bring their parents prejudices against educators into the classroom, making the job even more difficult. And then guess who gets blamed?

        1. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Where do you suppose those prejudices stem from? Could it possibly be first hand knowledge? Sadly my daughter in law is a teacher, her politics run way to the left. I think she chose the worst possible profession given her temperament and palpable dislike for children. Her parents are the two biggest influences in her life and they happen to be as dumb as stumps. I hear all the time on forums such as these how Texas is a backwards State with a poor educational system. Have you ever thought about who are being taught in our schools?

          1. rebekahELLE profile image91
            rebekahELLEposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Prejudices are often taught and ingrained into family structures and passed on through generations. It's quite sad that parents are afraid to allow their children to think for themselves and form their own opinions. Parents are not always right. I once remember seeing a grandfather bend down and tell his twin 5 year olds, (as he was dropping them off at the classroom), that Obama was going to take their money. This was on election day 2008. ?? Insane.

            Children are not something to mold. They should be taught how to discover and think and ask questions, reason, ponder, assess, on and on. That's a whole discussion in itself and I do have a few hubs about education.

            I currently work in a private school and while it's different in some aspects, it's not entirely. Bottom line, private schools are about profit and freedom to choose curriculum and less bureaucracy. It doesn't always guarantee a better educational experience.

            ?

            1. Repairguy47 profile image60
              Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I am asking if you know who a lot of the students are that are being enrolled into Texas schools? Many of them are children of illegal immigrants who do not speak English, many of these kids do not want to learn English or even attend school. They still take the exams that show how well a school is doing and when they fail it reflects on the system as a whole.

              1. rebekahELLE profile image91
                rebekahELLEposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                ok, thanks for the clarification. I wasn't sure what you meant.
                I can understand that, as Florida also has many migrant children. I'm sure it varies with families, but I found the parents of those children extremely interested in their children's education. They wanted them to do well, and the kids were eager to learn. Perhaps what may be lacking is respect. It will go a long way in enabling schools to thrive, when there is respect for all involved, regardless of where children are from.

            2. kashannkilson profile image59
              kashannkilsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Do the private schools take part in the standardized testing that "No Child Left Behind" put in place?

  6. MelissaBarrett profile image60
    MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago

    Just dropping in to state my normal "If you don't agree with how the public schools are raising your children, feel free to actually raise them yourself"

    And, if you don't like what teachers teach, feel free to spend a large chunk of your life and put yourself thousands of dollars in debt to learn how to teach effectively.  Then spend the rest of your life earning pay that is disproportionate to the amount of time you spend doing your job while every parent who feels that you are not doing THEIR job to THEIR liking cops an attitude with you.  And amazingly all the parents are saying different things.

    1. Repairguy47 profile image60
      Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      You are bright and shining example of what I am talking about.

      1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
        MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        A parent who thinks that the responsibility of educating my children is on my head?  Yep, that's me. 

        Like I said, if you didn't like the way the school system was raising your children, why on Earth would you continue to put them in such a horrible situation?  You chose to send them.

        1. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You should really catch up, you have fallen behind.

          1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
            MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            All caught up now.  Sorry I can't read posts while typing one. 

            Has it occurred to you that the reason the teachers don't want parents "sitting in" is because they are distractions.  A room full of kindergartners and their parents could be in upwards of 60 people.  Good luck teaching with that.

            So you sent your kids to private school.  Probably a good choice for you.  So problem solved... what are you complaining about again?

            1. Repairguy47 profile image60
              Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I am complaining about the fact public schools suck. I thought that was clear, I can complain because I still pay a tax so those crappy schools can exist even though I do not have any children attending.

              1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
                MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Yeah, I pay those taxes too.  I like the idea of Unions.  I love the NEA. I'm a homeschooling parent, so my daughter will likewise not be benefiting from a public education.

                You say they suck, I say they might, but not for the reasons you think. 

                *shrugs*

                1. Repairguy47 profile image60
                  Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Then what are your reasons?

                  1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
                    MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    I don't think there is enough separation of church and state.  I also feel that bullying against minorities (including gays) is unacceptable, but that the religious right has blocked any real efforts to incorporate education on sexism, homophobia, and cultural awareness. 

                    I think teachers have their hands too tied in freedom to truly teach and that the schools are too underfunded to teach effectively.  I think cuts to the fine arts programs are limiting to children who are more inclined to creativity than logical thinking.

                    In my personal case, my daughter is special needs and the funding just doesn't exist to address her needs within the public school setting.

                    The problem isn't with the teachers union or the NEA.

  7. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 5 years ago

    What you guys need to understand is that all public schools, all public school systems, and all public school teachers are "not created equal." From my years of experience, I honestly think public schools represent the best and the worst of education. We have a private school nearby, and when I've received trasfer students from there, these students are behind our public school students about 75% of the time. "Private" doesn't necessarily mean better.

    I know that much of the rest of the U.S. considers South GA to be full of ignorant rednecks, but I was always proud of where I taught. It was an ultra-modern school, with outdoor laboratories, livestock, vegetable gardens, flower gardens, and even aquaculture pools. There were special programs and classes for students who wanted to enter the medical field, education, childcare, auto repair, welding, construction, cosmetology, business, farming, animal husbandry, forestry, marketing, veterinary medicine, journalism, the performing arts, and more. We had a good mix of whites, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and even a few Muslims, and we all got along fine.

    We also had (and still have) a great sports program, with football, basketball, soccer, tennis, golf, track, softball, swim team, and even a rodeo team. Many of our students have received college scholarships for sports, and we've had several students go on to play professionally.

    Oftentimes, students have a lot more options in public schools than they do in private schools. They also have to learn to get along with those from different socio-economic groups, just as they will in real life.

 
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