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The Real Employment Message

  1. profile image0
    JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6122377_f248.jpg

    Here's some interesting information. This is the total number of non-farm payroll jobs, averaged for each quarter, for each year of Obama's presidency. The first line(blue) of each Quarter is the year before Obama took office.

    Another interesting aspect. In 2000, there were:

    174,136,341 workforce age
    128,763,000 employed
    45,373,341 non-working adults
    26% non-working adults

    In 2010, there were:

    194,296,087 workforce age
    127,309,000 employed
    66,987,087 non-working adults
    34% non-working adults

    The percentage of workforce-age adults who aren't working has increased by 30%. This is what people talk about when they say unemployment doesn't reflect the true message. As a percentage of the population, we have 21% more unemployed people than we did under Bush(using the following figures.

    In 2008, there were
    190,000,000 workforce age(estimate extrapolated from 2000-2010 trend)
    135,840,000 employed
    54,160,000 non-working adults
    28% non-working adults


    So, let's look at employment as a percentage of the workforce-age adults from year to year:

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/6122451_f248.jpg

    Those who are touting the recent employment numbers should reconsider their opinions.


    All the information came from the following sites:

    http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/brie … 0br-03.pdf
    http://www.bls.gov/webapps/legacy/cesbtab1.htm
    http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000

    1. uncorrectedvision profile image59
      uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Nice bit of research.  The 67% of working age actually in the labor force is the lowest that number has been for at least a decade.

      1. profile image0
        JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks.

  2. Sapphireid profile image65
    Sapphireidposted 5 years ago

    Hello JaxsonRaine,

    The job employment scene is very daunting, good job posting a forum post regarding this. I think you did a good job with the information you provided. I listened to, saw and read material describing similar information that you have here a few weeks back.

    Take care,

    Sapphireid

    1. profile image0
      JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks. I had a wonderful debate on Romney's work at Bain on a debate website. My opponent approached me after the debate and said that he changed his mind about his stance in the middle of the debate due to what I said, and had basically given it up from there. I wish we could all be like that, be willing to consider something objectively instead of always being entrenched.

      I posted a forum topic on his work at Bain in the forums of that website and the forums here, but not a single Anti-Bain person has responded to either one. Sadly, information like this usually falls on deaf ears, or only the choir hears it.

      I guess I'll just have to build up my own news outlet, get syndicated on TV and the radio, and become another talking head.

  3. Shadesbreath profile image87
    Shadesbreathposted 5 years ago

    The problem with statistics is that any argument using them always omits all the other statistics but the ones that serve the point that is attempting to be made.

    They are fun though.

    1. uncorrectedvision profile image59
      uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It is like my old statistics instructor would say - figures don't lie but liars can figure.  Statistics can be useful as a part of the evidence for a position - it is best that they do not become the whole position.

    2. profile image0
      JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      There is nothing inherently wrong with statistics, but they can be used improperly. I figured out these to show the ridiculous problem with using Seasonally Adjusted NFP figures and a clearly incorrect unemployment figure to say things are better than they are.

      1. Shadesbreath profile image87
        Shadesbreathposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Well, you know what they say, "Liars figure, and figures lie."  lol.

        1. profile image0
          JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Yes, we can always fall back on cliche sayings for truth.

          If there is a problem with my statistics, please, feel free to point it out.

          1. Shadesbreath profile image87
            Shadesbreathposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I was agreeing with you.

            1. profile image0
              JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Oh, lol. Sorry. I get paranoid when I'm tired big_smile

      2. Will Apse profile image88
        Will Apseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Germany has its lowest unemployment rate for nearly twenty years at present.

        It stands at 6.7 percent. http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/ … RF20120131

        Germany does not export jobs, of course.The culture, generally, is to develop skills and short-termism is frowned upon.

        In countries where capital is king, the opposite is true. You can get a quick return outsourcing even if the longer term consequence is a hollowing out of the economy as well paid jobs get scarcer and scarcer.

        1. profile image0
          JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Companies wouldn't outsource as much if we didn't make it so expensive to do business in the US. One of the highest corporate tax rates in the world, it's not the company's fault.

          Nor is outsourcing necessarily bad. It allows a company to deliver products for less, and it allows companies that couldn't survive at all without it to survive.

          Beside, our lowest unemployment rate in 20 years is 4%, so why is Germany's business plan better than ours?

          1. Will Apse profile image88
            Will Apseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            The unemployment rate in the US according to the latest figures is 8.7%. If you don't understand how to find and use stats, I would avoid them.

            http://www.google.co.th/publicdata/expl … yment+rate

            1. habee profile image89
              habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              According to CNBC, that figure doesn't include the 1.2 million who have stopped looking for jobs. I posted the link on another forum, if you'd like to check it out.

            2. profile image0
              JaxsonRaineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I was comparing our lowest in 20 years to Germany's lowest in 20 years. I didn't say it is 4% right now, in case you haven't noticed, it fluctuates.

              The entire point of this thread was to point out some of the problems with the official unemployment figure. It only tells us about unemployment, not how many are unemployed. There is a difference between the two.

            3. uncorrectedvision profile image59
              uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              That is only the U-3 unemployment number.  It describes a specific number based on a proscribed set of parameters.  The U-6 number is, and has been since the Obama Depression started, nearly twice that high.  Check the Bureau of Labor Statistics - one should know where to look for these sorts of things if one is to deal in facts.

        2. uncorrectedvision profile image59
          uncorrectedvisionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          The Germans don't export jobs?  That will be a surprise to:

          1 - Siemens USA Holdings-  23,200 Jobs
          2 - Volkswagen of America- 2,500 Jobs
          3 - T-Mobile USA-   29,000 Jobs
          4 - Allianz North America-   9,000 Jobs
          5 BMW of North America-   1,302 Jobs

          (http://www.olafbohlke.com/public/Top50G … iesUSA.pdf)

          That is 5 of 50, the jobs listed are from 2006, that number may now be fewer.  The point is that the Germans, like all smart economies put jobs where ever they are profitable.

          The reason Germany is creating so many domestic jobs is that they refused to do massive bailouts for their own banks and businesses.  Angela Merkel was rather critical of the idea.  The result is that they have concluded their internal recession and now are the only ones capable of sustaining the EURO.  The next three largest economies in the Eurozone - France, Italy, Spain - are in varying degrees of financial trouble.

          Ironically, it appears that Europe will be a German Empire after all.

          The best way to keep jobs here is unwind the massive administrative state and its ridiculous cancer of regulations from the economy.

 
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