Rick Perry's Political Views

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Brief Biography

Rick Perry was the 47th Governor of Texas, serving from 2000-2015 and is one of many politicians currently running for the 2016 GOP Presidential nomination. Perry came to the national spotlight in 2011 and was, for a time, a frontrunner for the Republican nomination before a number of key missteps in early debates left Perry struggling to catch up to competitors like Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum. After poor showings in the Iowa Caucus and the New Hampshire primary, Perry decided to drop out of the race for the nomination in January 2012, with the Republican nomination eventually going to former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney. Perry is taking another run at the White House this time around, but faces stiff competition from the likes of Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, and Scott Walker, among others. This hub will take an unbiased look at Governor Perry's political views to determine where he stands on the key issues that may impact the upcoming election.

Political Views

1. Unemployment/Economic Growth: Governor Perry has repeatedly cited his ability to champion economic growth, pointing out that, under his watch, Texas was responsible for over 40% of new jobs created in the United States since 2009. Furthermore, Perry has pointed out that Texas's unemployment rate of 8.2% (as of August 2011) is lower than the nation's rate of 9.1%. Perry has cited his ability to keep taxes low and regulations "reasonable," as well as a successful incentive program to lure businesses into the state as an explanation for this success, and has vowed to enact similar programs if elected president to spur job creation. However, many independent economists have pointed out the logical impossibility of using incentive programs at a national level, since Texas's programs were largely responsible for taking jobs away from other states, not resulting in a net national gain in employment. Furthermore, over the course of Perry's entire term as governor of Texas, his economic record is mixed, as, since 2000, the US has averaged 0.6 percent annual GDP growth, while Texas has only averaged 0.5: a statistically insignificant difference (article link here for support).

2. Budget Deficit: Perry has generally championed lower tax rates on individuals and corporations alike while governor as Texas. He has come out as a strong opponent of the stimulus bill passed by Congress and signed by President Obama in 2009, recently stating "Washington's insatiable desire to spend our children's inheritance on failed stimulus plans and other misguided theories have give nus record debt and left us with far too many unemployed." If elected, Perry has vowed to try to close the budget deficit through spending cuts alone, and Perry is a signee to Grover Norquist's anti-tax pledge.

3. Social Security: Perry has pointed to social security as one possibility for closing the deficit, calling the program a "crumbilng monument to the failure of the New Deal" and stated his preference for a system that would "allow individuals to own and control their own retirement." Perry has not offered specifics about what such a system should look like.

4. Health Care Reform: Perry is an opponent of the Health Care Reform bill passed by Congress and signed by President Obama in 2010, calling it a "trainwreck" in February 2011 and demanding its immediate repeal. Perry has not offered any specifics for an alternative to the Health Care Reform bill beyond a generic call to "stimulate job creation so more Americans are covered by employer-sponsored health plans."

5. Global Warming/Environment: In Fed up, a book published, in 2010, Perry declared global warming to be a contrived phony mess" and later stated that he thinks there are "a substantial number of scientists who have manipulated data so that they will have dollars rolling in to their projects." This goes against independent analysis of climate change research, which suggest that 97% of climate scientists believe that global warming is in fact occurring and is being exacerbated by human behavior. Perr

6. Social issues: Perry has generally been pro-life and has expressed his opinion that abortion should only be permissible in a case of rape, incest, or if a mother's health is threatened. Perry is also a strong opponent of gay marriage, having signed a pledge in August 2011 which "commits a candidate to support a federal constitutional amendment defining marriage as between one man and one woman, defend the Defense of Marriage Act in court, appoint judicial nominees and an attorney general who would reject a constitutional right to gay marriage, and establish a commission to investigate harassment of anti-gay marriage donors or organizers..." Perry has also come out strongly against gays serving in the military, releasing a controversial advertisement in December 2011.

Please feel free to comment if anything in here is erroneous or factually incorrect and I'll look into it, and please check out my other Hubs if you enjoyed this one!

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Comments 5 comments

jonathannatural2 profile image

jonathannatural2 5 years ago

Do you think he or Mitt Romney is going to be the republican nominee? I am really rooting for Ronmey.


Steven lynch 5 years ago

Perry is not a better choice then Ron Paul.


Levellandmike profile image

Levellandmike 4 years ago from Levelland, Texas

First: this is a good article, well done.

Second: I'm not particularly taking issue with you, but your comparison of GDP growth, although fairly accurate is a bit skewed. It fails to mention that the 0.5% number cited is largely due to the oilfield crash of 2009. Believe me, it crashed hard: I was in oilfield construction at the time, my small company went from 375 drilling locations to build on Wednesday to 5 on Thursday. Within 30 days, we were out of business. So were many other small and medium-sized companies.

One large company, Patterson-UTI, not only locked the doors to it's facility here in Levelland, Tx., it WELDED them shut. That one alone translated into 50 lost jobs right here where I live. Overall, my area lost over 300 jobs. Now spread that over the whole Texas oil and gas industry, and see what you get.

While drilling has resumed, it is a far cry from what it was, and many oilfield workers are still not back at work.

Energy production is such a large part of the Texas economy that any time it goes down it is a huge and widespread blow to the state's economy. Absent that blow, Texas' economy is head and shoulders above the national average.


ajherrma profile image

ajherrma 4 years ago from United States Author

Thanks for the comment Levellandmike. I recognize your critique on GDP growth, and would like to direct you and others to a recent article in Business Week that takes a detailed look at Governor Perry's economic record: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/rick-perry-ne...


tishightime profile image

tishightime 4 years ago from Central Florida

As a Governor, knowing that promiscuity is king, was it a wise idea for Perry to suggest that all young women receive a series of anti-cancer injections? How much does it cost a state when they don't require such a measure? Just curious as to your thoughts on said issue.

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