Simultaneous Evictions at Occupy Camps: Conspiracy, Yes. Theory, No.

Occupiers Are Evicted Everywhere Within Days

Doesn't it seem just a little too coincidental? In New York, Toronto, Dallas, Oakland, London, Portland, Berkeley, Nova Scotia, Salt Lake City, Saint Louis . . . dozens of Occupy camps all evicted or threatened with eviction within a shorter period of time than the duration of Kim Kardashian's first marriage. And that prompts people to ask: Why were all these groups being evicted right now? If there is coordination, who is doing the coordinating? And isn't it strange, that if it is not coordinated, the evictions all happened at the same time, but the camps were set up on different dates? There seems to be little doubt that somehow, these evictions are meant to distract us and divide us. But there is also one thing it proves: the Occupy protests are working, because some group of people, somewhere, is getting very uncomfortable.

Police Restraining Demonstrator During Anti-War Protests on Day of President Nixon's Inauguration
Police Restraining Demonstrator During Anti-War Protests on Day of President Nixon's Inauguration | Source

Did Local Police Receive Federal Help?

Could this near-simultaneous action have been coordinated in the United States on a federal level? One Justice official reportedly says so. And Oakland Mayor Jean Quan admits in a BBC interview to a conference call with eighteen other mayors of large cities about the Occupy protests. Conspiracy, yes. Theory, no. Here's a list of just some of the Occupy camps who have been evicted, or are currently facing eviction, as gathered from newspaper reports:

  • Salem, OR
  • Dallas, TX
  • Portland, OR
  • New York City, NY
  • Nova Scotia, Canada
  • London, England
  • Toronto, Canada
  • Salt Lake City, UT
  • Saint Louis, MO
  • Berkeley, CA
  • Oakland, CA
  • Zurich, Switzerland
  • Tulsa, OK
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • Denver, CO
  • Saskatoon, Canada
  • Adelaide, Australia
  • Regina, Canada
  • Burlington, VT
  • Vancouver, Canada
  • Chattanooga, TN
  • Charlottesville, VA
  • Eureka, CA
  • Calgary, Canada
  • Phoenix, AZ
  • Colorado Springs, CO
  • Mobile, AL
  • Los Angeles, CA


Over the Top

In almost all cases where Occupiers have been evicted, police have shown up in the middle of the night, using horses, motorcycles, S.W.A.T. teams, helicopters, and LRADs (sonic cannons) on people who were mostly just peacefully sleeping. Most people have trouble understanding why such an over-the-top show of force is necessary against people who are asleep. In all cases, the concern has been for "public health and safety." Yet the police do not show such force when breaking up much larger homeless camps, if they even bother to show up there at all.

The more recent, and horrifying incident of pepper-spraying protesters who were peacefully sitting on the sidewalk at the University of California Davis protest underlines the over-the-top tactics that are being used worldwide. There's something going on here behind the scenes that we, the general public, are not privy to . . . but it shows us how uncomfortable the powers that be are with the Occupy movement.

Why at That Time?

Several events occur to me as to why at that particular time: the Super Committee in the U.S. Congress had its recommendation due out in a few days, the Black Friday shopping spree was upon us, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi had just handed in his resignation, and the Arab League's condemnation of the Syrian government had ripples elsewhere. Someone, or a group of someones, was getting very worried about what might happen next. What or who is behind this coordinated crackdown is still partly uncertain, but keep your eyes on the news, and think about each event's relationship to the Occupy movement, and whether that event could figure into the timeline of the crackdown. For a while, only privileged insiders had the answer. With some luck, and continued releases of documents by Anonymous and Wikileaks, one day perhaps the rest of us will know the full answer, too.

Protest, by Fogstock LLC
Protest, by Fogstock LLC | Source

What's Next?

History teaches us that when you break up a protest, it starts to resurface again, almost immediately, and in a form that is harder to control. The Occupy camps were all located in convenient, easily contained places. If the mayors of the cities who have evicted Occupy protesters think that they have the situation under control, history tells us that they are likely to be disappointed. The causes of the anger that people feel have not gone away, and if the Occupy movement is driven underground, then one has only to look to the former Eastern Bloc countries to see how widespread it will become. People, instead of going to Occupy camps, are going to start meeting in living rooms and coffee shops around the country, and planning short-term protests that are going to be staged without cooperation extended to local authorities. The "flash mob" may be one form of protest that no-one will be able to control. Destabilizing a protest movement is always a very risky undertaking.

Some of the former supporters of the movement, such as Adbusters, have stated that it is time the protesters should "declare victory, and pack up and go home." I think that shows a devastating lack of understanding of what has awakened across the world, and if Adbusters or any organization thinks they are going to tell the Occupiers what to do, they have a very unpleasant surprise in store for them. The Occupiers, with their General Assemblies, are not going to sit back and follow orders--from either the left or the right.

United States President John F. Kennedy said it best: "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable." I suggest the city mayors think long and hard about this statement, and then look at the historical similarities between "Let them eat cake" (the wheat harvest failed and there was no flour) and "Get a job!" (there are hundreds of applicants for each opening).

The Next Steps

Rather than blindly subscribing to the talking points of either political party, it's time for people who are serious about change to do some in-depth research. While most of the Occupiers I met were informed far better than the average person about economics, balance of power, and government, we must take up the challenge to go far beyond that information into a deep understanding of how to effect change. The violent reaction to the peaceful Occupy movement showed that it was perceived as threatening (even regarded as domestic terrorism) to the status quo, and so it was effective. Now we must figure out how to be even more effective on a stealth and individual level. Wherever you choose to begin, whether by beginning an ethical business, growing some food in a food desert, boycotting a business, feeding the homeless, or some other method, we must find the most effective ways of doing so and begin there. While large-scale protests will continue to take place, we must also protest effectively but silently. The books that follow have been carefully chosen to provide just such an education into both what has worked historically, and what kinds of actions might be useful in the future.

The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy
The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy

This book predicts that change to the capitalist system is inevitable, and shows how small-scale (even for companies as small as one person) efforts for reform can drive large changes.

 
The Tao of Democracy: Using Co-Intelligence to Create a World that Works for All
The Tao of Democracy: Using Co-Intelligence to Create a World that Works for All

While still working in stealth, it's important to work together and co-ordinate our efforts. In addition, we can all learn from each other, so we can work more effectively. This book shows us how we can, together, start to implement change on every level.

 
A Power Governments Cannot Suppress
A Power Governments Cannot Suppress

An inspiring and informative look at the history of social change, with examples to follow for ourselves in bringing about change on a small scale that grows into a larger movement.

 
The Manufacture Of Evil: Ethics, Evolution, and the Industrial System
The Manufacture Of Evil: Ethics, Evolution, and the Industrial System

Presents the conflict between our natural social bonds, and those that are imposed on us by industrialization. Incredible insight into the conflict, which may lead readers to devise creative solutions.

 
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

An insider's tale of economic imperialism, similar to Naomi Klein's groundbreaking Shock Doctrine. The book proposes specific actions to take to counter such power grabs.

 
The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom
The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom

With collaborative sites such as blogs, forums, social media, and Wikipedia, individuals all over the world are transforming our society. This is a look into how such change is occurring, why it occurs, and how this change can benefit people who wish to fight back against the plutocracy.

 

© 2011 progressivist

Why Now? 8 comments

SanXuary 5 years ago

Excellent observation and yes the revolution is only beginning. The next targets will be political campaigns and confrontation will be even more likely. The next moves to occupy will be met with force and protesters will be forced to be even bolder and force will insure that it will become worst. People complained about the homeless who joined uninvited but the next uninvited guests will be those who simply have a desire for civil unrest. Force will cause riots and those uninvited guest will insure that it gets ugly. Sometimes you have to give a little to prevent a lot. When you gamble on the idea of giving nothing and that force will rule in your favour. You better hope that it does not backfire. It does not take long or much to create a group of martyrs and change public opinion so gamble if you so desire. With all this anger seething within the population going unnoticed I hope they think before they act next.


Xenonlit profile image

Xenonlit 5 years ago

Brilliant article. I appreciate the work that you have done to identify all of the cities where this is going on. This gives much more power to the accusations that some collusion and premeditation is going on.

The mayors were meeting when Oakland blew up with police malfeasance, so they have probably been working with FEMA or Homeland Security to suppress the protests.

I do wish that people would quit getting arrested, though. All they are doing is adding themselves to databases that will be used for harassment and suppression in the courts and elsewhere.

Again, Well done!I will refer to this article and share it!


progressivist profile image

progressivist 5 years ago Author

SanXuary, you are right. Infiltration is an old tactic and one of which we are very aware. I guarantee you are going to see the 21st-century version of samizdat, and probably some other tactics that will develop with new (or revived old) technology.

Xenonlit, remember it was those brave souls like the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., whose repeated arrests outraged people enough to make people sit up and take notice (I remember those days quite well). Someday, perhaps, arrested for protesting will turn out to be a badge of honor, just as it was for the Founding Fathers, none of whom were particularly peaceful! :)


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 5 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY

Excellent points. This very thing was being disucssed on "Countdown with Keith Olberman" last night, suggesting a federal government central control of the anti-occupy objective. The occupy movement may not have an MLK or a Gandhi to rally around but I believe these coordinated aggressions are going to backfire and reignite a movement that was starting to lose some of the media limelight until this happened.

Rob


progressivist profile image

progressivist 5 years ago Author

Rob, I think you are right. The out-of-control use of police resources was the clue that was needed to make people realize that something here is just not right with the way these camps were treated. Nobody needs to use helicopters and SWAT teams to subdue people who are asleep in the middle of the night; and if we look at history, which governments did use such tactics, and what happened to them within a generation?


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 5 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY

Mayor Bloomberg's plan in NY backfired. He tried throwing the protesters out of Zuccitti Park yesterday, but today (Thursday) on the 2 month annivesary of the movement, 30,000 people gathered, marching from Union Square and across the Brooklyn Bridge. It's the biggest crowd yet.

Bad move, Mr. Mayor.

Rob


SanXuary 5 years ago

I was studying the history of the protest movement and they were far uglier when the first ones occurred in the early 1960"s Basically they beat them and jailed them and no one cared so actually we have come a long ways. Oddly enough their our a lot of protesters everywhere but they are not organized and do not have one that they can join locally. Still I believe that putting together petitions and getting signatures would be far more productive. You would have a known agenda, you would recruit millions behind them and when the Government tells the people to go to hell we can finally have a real protest.


progressivist profile image

progressivist 5 years ago Author

Sanxuary, petitions and signatures would be great if our elected representatives actually represented the people who vote for them, but they don't, by and large. And we won't even mention the rigged voting machines (I know this for a fact as I have had personal experience with seriously flawed voting machines). As for local Occupy groups, www.occupytogether.org lists thousands of groups all over the world (and more starting all the time).

The Powers That Be love leaders and agenda. Once they have those they can pick apart the agenda and smear the leaders. Occupiers have learnt from the past and choose to be leaderless and amorphous. (You can read more of my hubs for my particular views on why this strategy is so darned valuable.)

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working