Sex and Carrots

Carrots are considered one of the most staple foods in modern cooking. The truth about these brightly colored veggies is that they have been a popular aphrodisiac since ancient times. The Greeks called the carrot "Philtron" and used it as a love medicine to make men more ardent and women more yielding.

Carrots were used extensively by early Middle Eastern royalty to aid seduction. The Roman emperor Caligula forced the whole Roman Senate to eat carrots so he could see them "Rut like wild beasts". They were recognized as one of the plants in the garden of the Egyptian king Merodach-Baladan in the eighth century B.C. He only used the leaves and flowers of the carrot for cooking, too bad he missed out on the best parts!

The root of the carrot is the most widely used and highly beneficial part of the carrot. It's mentioned in Shakespeare's work, worn as adornments on hats, and used as subjects in Renaissance paintings. They were referred to as the “honey underground" by the early Celtics, and in the 1870s Iranian men used to drink carrots stewed in sugar to increase the quality and quantity of their sperm.

Carrots show up in every form of eatery from cakes and candies to stews, salads, and side dishes. They are rich in vitamins and beta-carotene and are part of the reason why the carrot is thought to increase sperm counts. Some would mention the phallic shape of them as a stimulating visual as well, but that’s a matter of opinion.

Try carrots out for yourself in your own passionate pursuits. Along with the obvious salads, or cold and raw with dip, experiment with different ways of serving carrots. Carrots Glazed in Brown Sugar is a delectable and sensuous way to eat carrots. This dish goes great with beef, pork, chicken or seafood as the main entree.

Carrots Glazed in Brown Sugar

Ingredients:
1 Pound Baby Carrots
1 Cup Water
1/3 Cup Packed Brown Sugar
2 Tablespoons Butter
Pepper to taste

Instructions:
Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan and stir while bringing to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for about 25 minutes, or until carrots are tender and the liquid has evaporated. Leave the pan uncovered and stir periodically for best results.

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