Wedding Corsage VS Tussie Mussie Flowers

Dainty little tussie mussie with yellow violas added at the last minute, for mother of the bride.
Dainty little tussie mussie with yellow violas added at the last minute, for mother of the bride. | Source
In the planning stages a tussie mussie of roses and white phlox.
In the planning stages a tussie mussie of roses and white phlox.
Surrounding the roses with Queen Anne's Lace gives this nosegay a Victorian quality.
Surrounding the roses with Queen Anne's Lace gives this nosegay a Victorian quality. | Source
Xtra special tussie with orchids, roses and ranunculus.
Xtra special tussie with orchids, roses and ranunculus.

Wedding Corsage VS Tussie Mussie Flowers

In my shop more and more brides are requesting pretty little Tussie Mussies rather than corsages for moms and grandmothers. Fabrics are often too fragile to support pins and it's just nice to give a tiny delicate little bouquet to the family members. It's best just to ask them.

The tussie mussie originated in the Victorian era and traditionally was composed of fragrant herbs. It was carried under the nose to mitigate the stench of the streets, or to ward of disease in crowded areas. Herbs such as rosemary and thyme were often selected for their fragrance.

Today tussie mussies or nosegays are constructed from all sorts of flowers with one or two focal point flowers such as ranunculus or roses, then smaller filler flowers and delicate leaves surrounding it. In our shop we wrap the stems just like a bridal bouquet or tie it with a pretty bow in chiffon ribbon. On occasion a delicate lace hanky is arranged around the flowers.

Tussie mussies can be constructed from dried flowers also and one of my favorites is dried lavender. It is fragrant and a soft pastel purple. Its long stem creates an interesting accent to the other rounder flowers.

For weddings we use flowers from the bridal bouquet but add something extra to make them individual and special like viola blossoms or a spray of seed pearls.

I started making tussie mussies, or nosegays when I was very young. Usually they were red and pink my favorite colors and ended up in my bedroom in a vase of water. My dad's garden was an amazing collection of just about every variety of flower so I had a lot from which to choose.

To make your own tussie mussie gather things from your garden, including pretty foilage. (In the picture of the orange tussie mussie you can see the delicate green foilage from an azalea bush) I often pick things from my garden when I'm constructing wedding flowers such as the tiny yellow violas I added to this same tussie mussie.

Wash them carefully as they may have critters, especially on the backs of the leaves. Strip the stems so that they are clean, then begin laying the stems across your palm, turning the bouquet as you work. You can insert stems later to get a good balance. Then tie with string. Cover the string with a ribbon and hold in place with a pin which you can cover with a bow.

When I'm using a flower or foliage of which I'm not acquainted I start this process the day before, and put them in water to see how they hold up. It's not pretty to have a blossom drop dead in the middle of your bouquet. If a flower or foilage will hold up overnight in a glass of water then chances are it will hold up for several hours out of water. Also this hydrating process will make all your flowers last longer.

Tussie Mussies make lovely little gifts when you go visiting too. Be sure to leave an inch of exposed stem on the bottom so they can go into a little vase.

 

Comments 5 comments

cardelean profile image

cardelean 5 years ago from Michigan

I've never seen or heard of that done, interesting.


Irene C 5 years ago

I like the little Tussie Mussies. Very beautiful.

Irene from http://www.corsagesforprom.org


mslizzee profile image

mslizzee 5 years ago from Buncombe County, NC Author

Thank you Irene and Cardelean. I am new at hubbing so receiving a compliment on anything is encouraging.

Lizzee


Irene C 5 years ago

Thank for sharing these interesting information and tips.

Irene of http://corsagesforprom.org/


mslizzee profile image

mslizzee 5 years ago from Buncombe County, NC Author

Thank you Irene for your comments. I appreciate them.

Lizzee

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