Wedding Guests' Hotel Reservations: Be Careful or Pay!

Caution: When reserving rooms for wedding guests!
Caution: When reserving rooms for wedding guests!

Wedding Guests and Hotel Reservations: CAUTION!

Every considerate bride- and groom-to-be knows that they can book "blocks" of hotel rooms to guarantee better rates for their wedding guests. It's also wise to do this at different venues in different price ranges to give guests' options. Not everyone can afford the best place in town!

Here's the question: Who's responsible for payment? The person who booked the block of rooms or the wedding guests?

If you're not careful, it may just be you, the bride- and groom-to-be!


Who pays if wedding guests DON'T show?
Who pays if wedding guests DON'T show?

A Tale of Wedding Hotel Reservation Woe!

One of our AAWP members sent us this email:

(I recently acquired a client) who signed a room contract for her wedding which makes her responsible for 100% of the revenue from the rooms blocked. She blocked 44 rooms spread across 3 nights. The contract states that she has to compensate for the revenue lost if the rooms are not booked. She said she had to sign this contract to get a discounted room rate. And to make matters worse, she may have to change the wedding date.

What happens? If the rooms are $50 per night, she is responsible to pay $6600 in hotel fees, per the contract SHE signed.


Read the fine print, or pay the consequences! Better yet, run all contracts past your attorney.
Read the fine print, or pay the consequences! Better yet, run all contracts past your attorney.

The Solution: Wedding Guests and Hotel Reservations

If you are a bride- or groom-to-be who intends to reserve blocks of rooms for their wedding guests, the most important thing to do is to read the contract's fine print. If you are responsible for payment for rooms should the guests not show, don't sign! Your wedding guests are on their own!

NOTE: Should this happen, suggest hotels in all price ranges where your guests may stay, but let them do their own negotiating and make their own reservations.

WORD OF WARNING: When it comes to weddings and contracts, it's always wise to read the fine print before signing. And as a further safeguard, it's always smart to run any and all contracts past your attorney.

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