Wedding Invitation Wording: "The Honour of Your Presence"???

"request the honour of your presence" ??
"request the honour of your presence" ??

"The Honour of Your Presence" ??

If you're getting married, you know that classic invitation wording is the one most found on a bride-to-be's wedding invitation... It goes like this:

Mr. and Mrs. Charles James Jones

request the honour of your presence

at the marriage of their daughter

Cynthia Marie

to... etc. etc. etc.

But did you know that it's not always proper to use the wording... "request the honour of your presence" ??? In fact, in some cases, it could be downright wrong!

NOTE: Honour may also be spelled "honor" but many brides prefer the English spelling of the word for their wedding invitations.

Yes... "request the honour of your presence..." !f the wedding takes place on hallowed ground.
Yes... "request the honour of your presence..." !f the wedding takes place on hallowed ground.

"request the honour of your presence" How It's Used...

Crane's is known for their fine stationary and the quality of their wedding invitations. They are premium and elegant and a bride-to-be would be hard-pressed to find invitations that surpass Crane's.

The company also published their Wedding Blue Book, by Steven Feinberg, which is the ultimate resource when it comes to wedding invitations and their wording.

According to Crane's book, "The wording varies according to where the wedding is being held. The correct wording for a wedding held in a church, temple, synagogue, or any house of worship is, 'request the honour of your presence.'"

In this case it's, "request the pleasure of your company.."
In this case it's, "request the pleasure of your company.."

What If You're Not Married in Church, Temple, etc.?

If you're not being married in a church, temple, etc. or in any house of worship, then the correct wording is, "request the pleasure of your company."

The two phrases, therefore, are not interchangeable and should be properly used.



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