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neglect

  1. mr. daydream profile image60
    mr. daydreamposted 7 years ago

    There are two types of mistakes in my book...

    (1) Accidental honest mistakes, and

    (2) Neglectful, careless errors that (PERHAPS) the person may lukewarmly regret but yet in still keep repeating.

    Are you patient enough to keep forgiving this person. Do you keep turning the other cheek (you only have two) and being the bigger person til' you feel like you're 50 feet tall (lol). Opinions please!

    1. Buck Steiner profile image59
      Buck Steinerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Technically you have four cheeks!

      1. mr. daydream profile image60
        mr. daydreamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I thought about it, but booty cheeks don't count, lol.

    2. Sally's Trove profile image99
      Sally's Troveposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I have a slightly different outlook, which I call "three strikes", and this view is not based on the other's intentions but on my own perceptions.

      If someone does "wrong" by me the first time, then I see it as a mistake. The second time, I begin to wonder. The third time, I know there is a pattern in this person which will not mesh with me.  Then it's time to say good-bye.

      Forgiveness is another question. You and I can forgive all we want to, and feel good about it, but when the behavior from the other person begins to negatively affect our lives, then we need to look at staying around this person or not.

      Great topic.

      1. mr. daydream profile image60
        mr. daydreamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        good response

      2. angela_michelle profile image90
        angela_michelleposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I agree with your outlook. I have forgiven a friend who has a mental illness repeatedly, but then it occurred to me that her repeated behavior was harming me severely. I realized I can love her, forgive her, but protect myself from being hurt by her, by keeping distant. I am nice to her, I am respectful to her, but I keep her at arms length.

        1. mr. daydream profile image60
          mr. daydreamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Sometimes you gotta let em' go.

        2. profile image59
          taranovaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I too have a friend with a mental illness, and I agree with you.  The best thing to do is to give love and respect, but don't get too close or expect a two-way friendship.  These people are incapable of a give and take relationship.

    3. MoragCampbell profile image82
      MoragCampbellposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I think the answer to this depends ENTIRELY on not only your age, but this fictional other person's age.
      If you are past 50, well there are memory issues to be dealt with, plus the 50 pluses just don't give a damn the way the younger people do.
      If less than 50, however, then yes you have an issue. Deal with it. Either make it clear to the other person that their behaviour is not acceptable, accept their behaviour, or end the relationship. It all depends on how important it is to you (whatever it is that happened).

  2. tantrum profile image61
    tantrumposted 7 years ago

    I never turn the other cheek. Being hurt in one cheek it's enough for me LOL

    1. profile image59
      taranovaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I have time and time again turned the other cheek.  I've only hurt myself by doing it.  If you keep on giving and giving and giving, then eventually you lose respect of yourself,  and others will take advantage of your good nature and soft heartedness.

  3. DevLin profile image60
    DevLinposted 7 years ago

    tough love. Three strikes rule applies.

 
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