A - Z of Mythological Creatures (Just 'C')

Zeus
Zeus

Hey guys, I’m back with another collection of awesome mythological creatures, exclusive only to the letter C. I hope you’ve enjoyed ‘A’ and ‘B’ so far. If you haven’t seen those, check the link below.

Okay, so I’m really having a ball with this hub series on Mythological Creatures, you have no idea. Whenever my fingers start tapping away at my laptop, I’m completely gone! No kidding, the world around me disappears – I’m in fairytopia, I’m on Asgarde sipping beer with the Norse gods, I’m on top of friggin’ Mount Olympus, for pete’s sake! You know what, forgetaboutit, I didn’t say nothin’; I’m a madman – let’s just focus on the business at hand; I’ll stick to writing this stuff, and you stick to reading the damn thing, agreed?

Cailleach Bheur

See Blue Hag subheading in A-Z of Mythological Creatures (Just ‘B’ concluded) hub.

Caladrius

This creature comes from Medieval Europe; a large bird with all pure white feathers. This magical bird has the ability to cure any sickness by sucking it right out of the person who’s infected. This here, Caladrius is a pretty cool bird, ain’t it!

And there’s this really cool stuff the Caladrius does; after it sucks the sickness out of you and everything, it lifts its head right up and spits your sickness right into the sky. Doesn’t that stuff just kill you? And another thing is; if the Caladrius thinks you’re unworthy of being cured and all, it won’t even look at you, not even a side glance, no kidding.

Don’t you just love the bird; beats having a talkative parrot as a pet any day, don’t it?

Caladrius
Caladrius

Catoblepas

This creature lives in the mud flats of Ethiopia (That’s in Eastern Africa, in case you’re wondering). It looks pretty much like a Bufallo...except of course for the scaly skin...and boar tusks...and ah hah, the wings. The creature has friggin’ wings. And more so, deadly as well. It’s glance can kill anything, pretty much like the Basilisk (See Basilisk subheading in A-Z of Mythological Creatures (Just ‘B’) hub.

But the thing about the Catoplebas is that it’s slow as hell, and it holds its head down real low, and has pretty lousy motion. That’s what makes it pretty weak, I suppose. If a creature is got hard scaly skin, and big ol’ tusks, and wings and all...and then hasn’t got the speed to back it all up, then that creature basically sucks, and ordinary mortals like us who ain’t got none of those special attributes has a pretty good chance with them...if you gonna stick around to fight it, that is.

Catoplebas from the Final Fantasy Game
Catoplebas from the Final Fantasy Game

Centaurs

These ones are pretty popular – a race of creatures in Greek Mythology part human, part horse. They are known to be a very uncivilized and hostile race of people. Their origins are pretty interesting, so I’m gonna talk about that briefly.

Ixion who is the son of Ares (god of war) had murdered his father-in-law; he couldn’t find any purification from any of the gods, who already had long harboured beef with him, and his Pops. But eventually, Zeus purified him, and even admitted him as a guest in Mount Olympus – which is really like a big deal, of course. So now Ixionis having a ball, he’s wining and dining with the top gods in Mount Olympus; but what does he do? Instead of being grateful as hell to Zeus for his royal kindness and all, he tries to seduce Zeus’ wife Hera. And he almost succeeded too, but Zeus’ is a tricky son-of-a-gun (he ain’t the king of the gods for nothin’ I say), just before Ixion is about to close the deal on Hera, Zeus substitutes Hera for a cloud (bet you wish you could do that every time someone tries to sleep with your wife). So what Ixion does is - he fornicates with a cloud, gets a cloud to conceive...the cloud gives birth to centaurs, for pete’s sake! I know, I know...I don’t get it too. But that’s the thing with these gods, they do things you don’t get.

But Zeus wouldn’t let Ixion go scot free; but he’s still family and all. So what he does is, he binds him a fiery wheel and sends him tumbling in the underworld...forever. Ain’t that cold...or hot, as the case may be.

Centaurs later on grew on numbers and in might. They also grew to be a royal pain the ass for the rest of gods, and demi-gods, as well. They were known to have had serious beef with the Lapiths (a northern mountain tribe, who the Centaurs’ father Ixion was king to). This beef started when Pirithous who was a companion of the great Greek hero, Theseus, as well as the son and successor of Ixion was getting married to this chick named Hippodamia (daughter of Butes, the bee-master). The centaurs, drunk as mad, crashed the wedding and tried to rape the bride and her bride’s maids, so of course the Lapiths intervened, and drove them - the centaurs off from their habitation in Mount Pelion, and this here is how they became sworn enemies. This enmity is a very popular subject in Greek art (as depicted below in this 5th century sculpture).

There are some pretty renown Centaurs in Greek Mythology, like Chiron. Unlike most Centaurs, Chiron is a pretty decent one. Full of wisdom and everything. In fact, he instructed many great Greek heroes such as Heracles (i.e. Hercules), Achilles, Jason, and Asclepius. It is quite interesting to note that it was Heracles who accidently killed him with one of his poisonous arrow thingies. Chiron had renounced his immortality! When he died he was placed among the stars as the constellation Sagittarius. (See picture below).

Also another Centaur is this Nessus. This dude was pretty much like your average Centaur – evil and horny as hell. After Heracles had completed his 12 labours (I’ll be dedicating an entire hub to this), he had embarked on a war mission with the river god Archelaus – you know, after accomplishing those 12 great feats, he was feeling pretty confident with himself. I mean, who wouldn’t! So he fights this Archelaus for the hand of Deianeira, who’s supposed to be this really foxy goddess daughter of one Oeneus. I know the names are piling up a bit, but bear with me here...Heracles wins, and as he’s taking his new bride home, Nessus tries to rape her and all (Centaurs are really into this whole rape thing, no kidding); but Heracles, the badass he is, shoots him straight through with his poisonous arrow thingy. But the Centaur, a tricky bastard, while dying told Deianeira to preserve his blood – he told her that his blood was some kinda love charm, and that anyone wearing a garment rubbed with his blood would love her forever. Nessus fed her with this bull and she bought it, hook, line and sinker. I don’t get how a woman would believe a creature that tried to rape her like two seconds ago. I don’t get women; I really don’t.

Anyways, several years later, Heracles falls in love with this new chick, Iole, and makes her his concubine. And Heracles though a real macho dude, wasn’t really that much of a smart dude, because this here is what he does – he sends his Iole to go live with his wife Deianeira at their home in Trachis. Ladies, can you even imagine your husband doing that to you! But it wasn’t that much of a big deal in those days. Men were expected to have concubines and everything. In fact, it kinda added to what made you a real ‘man’ and all. But Deianeira wouldn’t have any of it – she had a rival in her home and so had to do something about it. Suddenly, a light bulb appears on her head, and she remembers the blood of Nessus – the ‘love charm’. And so she takes a garment, smears it with the Centaurs’ well preserved blood, and sends it down to Heracles. The blood proved to be a fatal poison, and so Heracles died instantly. The hero’s body was placed in a pyre on Mt. Oeta (Modern Greek Oiti), his mortal part consumed and his divine part ascending to heaven. There he was reconciled to Hera (his mother) and married Hebe (his sister). The gods were weird, don’t even mention it.

Pholus was another pretty well-known Centaur in Greek Mythology. When Heracles was carrying out the fourth, out of his 12 labours imposed on him by Eurystheus, King of Argos – a task which was to capture this wild boar of Mt. Erymanthus. So while chasing this boar, Heracles decides to drop into this Pholus’ crib, you know, have a drink, stretch his biceps, or whatever the hell heroes did to relax in those days. So Heracles is having a ball at this Centaur’s house and all, but then the hero demands that the Centaur serve him the Centaurs’ common wine. Pholus hesistates to do this, but Heracles insists like mad! But this here is a pretty sad story for the centaur, because he finally serves Heracles the wine, but then the other centaurs smell the wine, and they all want a drink as well. And you know how ugly this kinda stuff can get – they (centaurs) are fighting Heracles for the damn wine, and the hero, tough as nails killed them, and chased away the remaining. But then he discovers that in the midst of all the craziness, Pholus had accidently dropped one of Heracles’ poisoned arrow thingies on his foot and had died. And this here is a guy just trying to be nice to a well-known hero.

There’s a valuable lesson to be learned from this – I say, don’t be nice too nice to celebrities; they could be POISON!

Other Centaurs whose names are mentioned in Greek Mythology include – Eurytion, who had tried to rape king Dexamenos' daughter (told you centaurs were big on rape), but Herakles rescued the girl and killed Eurytion. There was Elatos – who was actually the Centaur that Cheiron was protecting when Herakles shot Cheiron. And there was Abas, a really skilled badass hunter.

I say, Centaurs though labelled in the negative light, are not all bad apples. As long as they’re not thinking about rape and stuff, they ain’t half bad creatures. No kidding.

Centaur and Lapith, high relief metope, one of the Elgin Marbles, from the Parthenon, Athens, 5th century BC in the British Museum. (SEFArt Resource, New York)
Centaur and Lapith, high relief metope, one of the Elgin Marbles, from the Parthenon, Athens, 5th century BC in the British Museum. (SEFArt Resource, New York)

There are some pretty renown Centaurs in Greek Mythology, like Chiron. Unlike most Centaurs, Chiron is a pretty decent one. Full of wisdom and everything. In fact, he instructed many great Greek heroes such as Heracles (i.e. Hercules), Achilles, Jason, and Asclepius. It is quite interesting to note that it was Heracles who accidentally killed him with one of his poisonous arrow thingies. Chiron had renounced his immortality! When he died he was placed among the stars as the constellation Sagittarius. (See picture below).

Sagittarius Constellation
Sagittarius Constellation

Also another Centaur is this Nessus. This dude was pretty much like your average Centaur – evil and horny as hell. After Heracles had completed his 12 labours (I’ll be dedicating an entire hub to this), he had embarked on a war mission with the river god Archelaus – you know, after accomplishing those 12 great feats, he was feeling pretty confident with himself. I mean, who wouldn’t! So he fights this Archelaus for the hand of Deianeira, who’s supposed to be this really foxy goddess daughter of one Oeneus. I know the names are piling up a bit, but bear with me here...Heracles wins, and as he’s taking his new bride home, Nessus tries to rape her and all (Centaurs are really into this whole rape thing, no kidding); but Heracles, the badass he is, shoots him straight through with his poisonous arrow thingy. But the Centaur, a tricky bastard, while dying told Deianeira to preserve his blood – he told her that his blood was some kinda love charm, and that anyone wearing a garment rubbed with his blood would love her forever. Nessus fed her with this bull and she bought it, hook, line and sinker. I don’t get how a woman would believe a creature that tried to rape her like two seconds ago. I don’t get women; I really don’t.

Anyway, several years later, Heracles falls in love with this new chick, Iole, and makes her his concubine. And Heracles though a real macho dude, wasn’t really that much of a smart dude, because this here is what he does – he sends his Iole to go live with his wife Deianeira at their home in Trachis. Ladies, can you even imagine your husband doing that to you! But it wasn’t that much of a big deal in those days. Men were expected to have concubines and everything. In fact, it kinda added to what made you a real ‘man’ and all. But Deianeira wouldn’t have any of it – she had a rival in her home and so had to do something about it. Suddenly, a light bulb appears on her head, and she remembers the blood of Nessus – the ‘love charm’. And so she takes a garment, smears it with the Centaurs’ well preserved blood, and sends it down to Heracles. The blood proved to be a fatal poison, and so Heracles died instantly. The hero’s body was placed in a pyre on Mt. Oeta (Modern Greek Oiti), his mortal part consumed and his divine part ascending to heaven. There he was reconciled to Hera (his mother) and married Hebe (his sister). The gods were weird, don’t even mention it.

Pholus was another pretty well-known Centaur in Greek Mythology. When Heracles was carrying out the fourth, out of his 12 labours imposed on him by Eurystheus, King of Argos – a task which was to capture this wild boar of Mt. Erymanthus. So while chasing this boar, Heracles decides to drop into this Pholus’ crib, you know, have a drink, stretch his biceps, or whatever the hell heroes did to relax in those days. So Heracles is having a ball at this Centaur’s house and all, but then the hero demands that the Centaur serve him the Centaurs’ common wine. Pholus hesistates to do this, but Heracles insists like mad! But this here is a pretty sad story for the centaur, because he finally serves Heracles the wine, but then the other centaurs smell the wine, and they all want a drink as well. And you know how ugly this kinda stuff can get – they (centaurs) are fighting Heracles for the damn wine, and the hero, tough as nails killed them, and chased away the remaining. But then he discovers that in the midst of all the craziness, Pholus had accidentally dropped one of Heracles’ poisoned arrow thingies on his foot and had died. And this here is a guy just trying to be nice to a well-known hero.

There’s a valuable lesson to be learned from this – I say, don’t be nice too nice to celebrities; they could be POISON!

Other Centaurs whose names are mentioned in Greek Mythology include – Eurytion, who had tried to rape king Dexamenos' daughter (told you centaurs were big on rape), but Herakles rescued the girl and killed Eurytion. There was Elatos – who was actually the Centaur that Cheiron was protecting when Herakles shot Cheiron. And there was Abas, a really skilled badass hunter.

I say, Centaurs though labelled in the negative light, are not all bad apples. As long as they’re not thinking about rape and stuff, they ain’t half bad creatures. No kidding.

A Centaur
A Centaur

Cerastes

This is a deadly serpent that lives under sand. It lures its prey by submerging itself beneath the sand, while revealing only the four horns on its head. This here is how it lures its prey to the kill. So typical of a snake to do tricky stuff like that!

It is said that if one is Lucky enough (Lucky with a capital ‘L’) to capture a Cerastes, that such a one can use its horns like some kind of poison detector. Well, that’s if the snake don’t make you its poison receptor first!

A real life Cerastes (No Myth)
A real life Cerastes (No Myth)

Cerberus

This here is known as the Hellhound. A three-headed monster dog that stands guard at the gates of hell. He has a serpent for its tail (as if a three-headed dog isn’t mean enough, they had to throw in a serpent-tail, as well).

Cerberus is one of the three children by Typhoon, the grisly monster with 100 dragon heads (don’t even let me talk about that stuff) and Echidna, a monstrous half-woman, half-man – all giants of chaotic era before time began.

Cerberus’ other siblings are the multiheaded Hydra (wait for ‘H’) of Lernea and Chimera. You might be a three-headed dog and all, gosh, you might be the guard stationed at the very gates of hell and everything; but you truly don’t know you’re real evil badass, until your parents are Typhoon and Echidna, and your siblings are the Hydra and Chimera. When that’s your family, it pretty much clears everything up for ya. I’ll say!

Cerberus (Hellhound)
Cerberus (Hellhound)

Charybdis

This creature is mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey as a living whirlpool of some sort. Her dwelling overlooks the opposite shore of the monstrous Scylla (wait for ‘S’). During Odysseus’ journeys, while sailing from the underworld, Scylla had devoured most of his men as they sailed past the monster’s caves, but left the rest for Charybdis to swallow up, with only Odysseus as the survivor. Why? ‘cause he was favoured by the gods, what do you think!

You know what, fellas? Just ‘cause I’m such a good ol’ sport and all, I’m even gonna tell you where this Charydbis is. It’s in the Garofalo, along the coast of Calabria, in southern Italy – along Messina, in between Sicily (where we Wiseguys pay tribute) and the Italian peninsula. Plenty a ship has been shipwrecked within those places. So now you have it. When next you’re sailing there, tell the captain this, “Steer the hell away from the Garofalo!” You might be thanking me for this. You owe me now. And I’m a lot scarier than a dozen Charybdis when I come to collect!


Charybdis
Charybdis

Buy Changling (Movie)

Changelings

This is some scary stuff. No kidding. This stems from ancient European folklore, where it is believed that children are susceptible to demonic possession; and when that happens, the result is a changeling. (Go see the movie Changeling starring Angelina Jolie, directed by Clint Eastwood. It isn’t that demonic really, but a good movie, nonetheless)

A changeling is supposedly a deformed or imbecilic offspring of a demonic fairy used to substitute for a real child. The abducted child is either given to the Devil or to the stock of fairies. But there’s this madman stuff though – it is believed that the abducted child can be brought back if, and if only you can make the changeling laugh or if you can torture it. But you gotta do this before the fairy touches your kid, unless it’ll become a fairy itself. How you do that, beats me! In the medieval times, they tortured children who were believed to be devil-spawns like mad. This here is chronicled in Ralph of Coggeshall’s (chronicler of the late 12th and early 13th centuries) book Medieval Chronicles (don’t read this book, if you ain’t got a strong stomach).

The thing about changelings is they’re awfully pale and moody as hell, and even worse they all die young. Now, how you torture a kid like this, changeling or not! Crazy!

A Changling boy
A Changling boy

Ch'i-lin

Also called Ki Lin

This is a unicorn from Chinese mythology. The creature’s name is a combination of the two characters ch'i, “male,” and lin, “female.”) A ch'i-lin is described as having a single horn on its forehead, a yellow belly, a multicoloured back, the hooves of a horse, the body of a deer, and the tail of an ox. A ch'i-lin appears rarely – only at the birth or death of some sage or illustrious ruler.

Ch'i-lin are said to be the gentlest of creatures – they wouldn’t even bend the grass when they walk on them for heaven’s sake! And also, they would never eat a living thing. Instead, they would rather eat some stuff that’s all dead and withered. The skin of a ch'i-lin has hues of blue, black, green, red and white, which are the colours of the five Chinese elements; and they live for one thousand years. Probably ‘cause a sage is born one once every millennium – you know, being that they exist firsy to announce the birth of a sage or illustrious ruler, and then to declare his death (but that’s just my reasoning).

Here’s some useful info I’ll be throwing your way (you know, for a guy that hates the History Channel, I sure do read a lot of historical stuff, lol): The first ch'i-lin is said to have appeared in 2697 BC in the garden of the legendary ‘Yellow’ Emperor, Huang Ti. A ch'i-lin was not seen till three centuries later in the capital of Emperor Yao; not one, but a pair of ch'i-lin.

The last ch'i-lin to be seen was at the time of the birth of Confucius in the 6th century BC. The creature had appeared to Confucius’ mother whilst pregnant with him. After that she coughed up an inscribed jaded tablet that foretold the greatness of her son. Can you believe that! The death of Confucius was later foreshadowed when ch'i-lin was injured by a charioteer.

Here’s a fun story – in 1414, a giraffe was brought to China for the very first time, and presented to the Ming (Chinese dynasty, between 1368 – 1644) Emperor Yung-Lo as a ch'i-lin. The ruler knew he was being suckered, so here’s what he said, he said that he wasn’t no sage and the animal was certainly no ch'i-lin. Yung-Lo may not have been a sage, but he sure was a pretty smart guy, I gotta say.

ch'i-lin
ch'i-lin

Chimera

This is a pretty scary one. No kidding. This is a female fire-breathing monster in Greek mythology described as having the forepart of a lion, a goat in the middle, and a dragon’s rear. Its breath is like volcano fumes. Geez! The Chimera used to live in Lycia of Greece, and devastated those parts, as well as Caria and the mountain parts of Asia Minor. Until...daram daram...the mighty Greek hero, Bellerophon slew it.

The only thing now left of the Chimera is in its casual use to denote a fantastic idea or imagination. But to me, the biggest insult for the Chimera is in the flippant use of its name in art. I call it insult, ‘cause for a creature so terrifying and mean like the Chimera; for a creature that caused that much havoc in Europe and parts of Asia, to have its name converted into some stupid term in art, of all things – is a damn insult. Other creatures have their names used for star-constellations, planets, even natural disasters for pete’s sake! Art people will say, this statue is so chimére! Gawd, that kind of injustice just makes me wanna puke my guts out!

Chimera
Chimera

Cimmerians

Scholastically speaking, they are a member of an ancient people living north of the Caucasus (region lying between the Black Sea - west and the Caspian Sea – east, occupied by Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia.) and the Sea of Azov. They were driven by the Scythians out of southern Russia, over the Caucasus, and into Anatolia (Asian portion of Turkey) toward the end of the 8th century BC. Ancient writers sometimes confused them with the Scythians. I could go on talking about the historical conquests of the Cimmerians, and their battles with Assyria, Phrygia, and all. And as much as that stuff is interesting, I would be veering off course. I’m supposed to be talking about mythological creatures here, for heaven’s sake!

So what’s so mythological about Cimmerians, you might ask! Well, nothing except that Homer happened to describe the land of the Cimmerians as a land of fog and darkness. A land where the sun never rose upon it. So first of all, anything that’s in that Greek weirdo’s writings are considered mythological. But if that stuff isn’t enough for you – seeing that you gotta read about fire-breathing and flying creatures first, before you call them mythological, well excuse me!

A Cimmerian (much like a Berserker)
A Cimmerian (much like a Berserker)

Cinomolgus

Its name means ‘Cinnamon bird’. A giant bird that collected cinnamon to build its nests. There have been quite a few disputes over the nature of the Cinomolgus. This began with top men in Greek history, such as Herodotus, Aristotle, Pliny the Elder. According to Herodotus, the Cinnamon bird inhabited Arabia, the only country to produce cinnamon at the time. The bird collected the cinnamon sticks from an unknown land where the cinnamon trees grew, and used them to make its nests, atop cliffs. The Arabians however employed a trick to obtain the cinnamon. They cut oxen and other beasts of burden into pieces, laid them near the bird’s nest and hid themselves. The dumb bird would then pick up the pieces of meat and drop them right inside its nest. The weight of the meat would break the nest and the Arabians would then collect the fallen cinnamon. Aristotle’s view is that the bird builds the cinnamon nest in the tops of high trees, and when the inhabitants of the bird’s home wanted the cinnamon, they would attach leaden weights to their arrow tips to topple the nests, collecting the cinnamon sticks within.

However, Pliny the Elder, ever the sceptic said that all those tales about the creature making a cinnamon nest and all was hogwash, but was a tale employed by the natives to raise the price of cinnamon. Why this entire dispute is going on, you gotta worry for the bird though – I mean, it happened to love the only plant that is so damn valued by humans. I mean, they use cinnamon for perfumes and stuff. I bet the Cinnamon bird would have at some point preferred to be called, ‘apple bird’ or something really common like that. That way, it wouldn’t worry about Arabian merchants on its tail every damn time.

Cinnamon Bird
Cinnamon Bird

Cockatrices

They are pretty much like Basilisks - See Basilisk subheading in A-Z of Mythological Creatures (Just ‘B’) hub. In fact, there are schools of thought that consider them to actually be the same creatures.

However, Cockatrices were more birdlike in appearance.

cockatrice
cockatrice

Cock of Dawn

This is a magnificent three-legged cock believed by the Chinese to live in a tree in the land of Sunrise. Land of Sunrise, what is that? Well, the land of sunrise, where the sunrise resides. What about the Land of Sunset? Hey, go the West!

The Cock of Dawn is believed to be the ancestor of all roosters, and his call awakens the dawn. The red comb on he’s head is the symbol for the coming dawn. And you were wondering why roosters crow at the wake of dawn, right.

Corybantes

These are the male priests of the Phrygian goddess Cybele (Great Mother of the gods); wild and half-demonic. Much like the Bacchae - See Bacchae subheading in A-Z of Mythological Creatures (Just ‘B’) hub. and Maenads (wait for ‘M’), their worship can get pretty wild. However, that of the Corybantes isn’t orgiastic in that sense. In fact, it is the exact opposite of an orgy, or at least it becomes the exact opposite of an orgy real fast. You see, unlike their cult counterparts, instead of having wild crazy sex, in this wuchmacallit ritual of theirs, they go about castrating themselves just to show their devotion to Cybele. You know, that crazy stuff makes me just wonder – ‘cause I’m damn sure they leave that castrating part out when they’re recruiting members!

Crocotta

Once a hyena and a lioness did the nasty. And I hear the wild animals say, eww! Well, that union resulted in the Crocotta. A wild animal that lives in India and Ethiopia, said to have parts of both its parents. It is also said to have its mouth open perpetually, showing off its one tooth, which stretches the entire length of his mouth. And another weird feature he has is the backbone – the stuff sticks right outside of his body, and is inflexible.

It is said that the voice of the Crocotta is like a man howling at the moon. What does that even mean, a man howling at the moon! Gosh, ancient people kill me. They could have just said the Crocotta howls like a werewolf and have it done with already, Geez!

Crocotta
Crocotta

Cu Sith

(Pronounced ‘coo shee’)

An evil fairy dog in Scottish and Irish (Celtic) mythology. It is said to haunt the Scottish highlands. Cu Sith has yellow eyes and wet paws. In Irish mythology, however, the Cu Sith is said to be a coal-black hound with glowing or flaming eyes. In both mythologies, he is feared as a harbinger of death, and only appears to carry away the soul of a person to the afterlife.

Cu Sith is pretty large for a dog, too. Just about the size of a cow. So imagine a cow-sized dark dog racing towards you, growling and displaying its deadly teeth, all the saliva having large salivary scum dripping from its mouth – eyes like fire. You think you’re gonna die, you’re not sure though; but you do know that someone’s gotta go...’cause you know, if otherwise, the Cu Sith would never show up in the first place!

Cu Sith
Cu Sith

Scenes from the Movie, Odyssey (1997)

Polyphemus in the movie
Polyphemus in the movie
Odysseus (played by the great Armand Assante in the movie) and his mean, having their fill...
Odysseus (played by the great Armand Assante in the movie) and his mean, having their fill...
Polyphemus chewed off the head of Odysseus' man...eew!
Polyphemus chewed off the head of Odysseus' man...eew!
"Nobody has blinded me!" Ha!
"Nobody has blinded me!" Ha!
The Escape!
The Escape!

Cyclops

They are basically giants in Greek Mythology with one round eye, located on the center of the foreheads. However, there are two types of Cyclopses; one born from the Earth and Heavens, and the one born from other gods.

In Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus and his men had wandered into a strange island where they found a mighty cave, full of cheese and all. Hungry and famished, they helped themselves with all the free food, thanking their good fortune. They partied till late in the evening when the owner of place returned, the saw a herd of sheep and braced themselves up to see who the shepherd would be. A Cyclops, called Polyphemus, who was the son of Poseidon (god of the seas) and Thoösa (a nymph) walked in. The Cyclops rolled the gigantic stone over the only entrance and exit to the cave. Polyphemus wasn’t a very nice dude – I mean, he chewed off the head of one of Odysseus’ men and wanted more. Odysseus had to get him drink and sleep, then they sharpened a long stick and used it to pierce the giant’s only eye. That way he had to roll out the stone himself so that some light could come in. The Cyclops kept screaming for his Cyclops brothers’ help. But Odysseus was a smart guy, in fact he was more than that; the guy was a genius; he knew that all the gods pretty much knew his name, so he had earlier told Polyphemus that his name was ‘Nobody’. So when Polyphemus screamed for help, all he said was, “Nobody has blinded me!” Nobody paid him any attention, and that’s how Poseidon and most of his men escaped. What an idiot!

So you see, Earth Cyclopses aren’t so smart or anything. But there are divine Cyclopses, who are friends of the gods. In the Titanomachy, when the world and everything was in chaos, and all sorts of monstrous creatures roamed and devastated the then world, there were three renowned Cyclopses who stood with the gods against the monstrous titans in battle. These Cyclopses even made Great War instruments for the top three brother-gods – thunderbolts for Zeus, a trident for Poseidon, and a helm of invisibility for Hades. The names of these Cyclopses were Arges ("brightness"), Brontes ("thunderer"), and Steropes ("lightning-maker").


A Cenocephali
A Cenocephali

Cenocephali

It’s been a long ride; now we’re about to make a stop...a pit stop nonetheless. ‘cause when we drive off next, we’re taking ‘D’ along with us.

So, the Cenocephali here is this creature that has the head of a dog and the body of a human. Or it could be a creature that has the head of a human, and the body of a dog; you take your pick. Whichever the case, they are mean, badass creatures who are hostile to humans like mad. They don’t even wanna see ‘em, no kidding!

You can find these creatures in the deserted islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. And they protect their territories from humans by laughing at them. What is that? You don’t even wanna hear the Cenocephali laugh; when they laugh a typhoon comes and carries you away, no kidding.

You know, the Cenocephali laugh to protect themselves and all; and they choose all the tasteful, lonely spots to reside in. I mean, the Pacific Islands is where everything is happening, you know – you get Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Guinea, Tonga, Cook Islands, and all those tiny exotic places, right up to New Zealand, Australia, even friggin’ Hawai for pete’s sake! Now you wonder why explorers to those regions sometimes never come back! It’s the typhoon people. That stuff will kill ya!

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Comments 35 comments

\Brenda Scully 7 years ago

Do you really live in Africa....prove it??????


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Why you ask, Brenda?


Pete Maida profile image

Pete Maida 7 years ago

We have most of the creatures in our Dungeons and Dragons game but I'll have to point my son, the DM, to your hubs; I think there is information that he cna use.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Thanks Pete. Let me know if it helps him.


fortunerep profile image

fortunerep 7 years ago from North Carolina

I wonder if the idea or history of Caladrius was an influence in the making of the movie "the green mile"

dori


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

You know what Dori? I have thought about it. It may have been. Stephen King is a big fan of mythology. So, its possible.


\Brenda Scully 7 years ago

Just tell me the answer, dear


systechpro 7 years ago

Scand tru. sounds bad right? Hope to find more time afta my summer classes. you are sure going to somewhere far with your publications. a compilation might make a great book with time.


Jude 7 years ago

I found your post insightful, and I enjoyed reading it. Thanks!


rosariomontenegro profile image

rosariomontenegro 7 years ago from NEW YORK

Fiery,

I have to tell you something about the Kilin or Kilim or Chi Lin:

They are the fastest creatures in the whole of the universes, and I'm not kidding.

I got it from authorized sources.

You go boy.


dohn121 profile image

dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York

Helluva hub, fierycj. I'd buy you a drink if I could (like if you're nearby, but in THE HEART OF AFRICA and all...) In any case, kudos to you!


psychicdog,net 7 years ago

yes, I think I've seen a cenocephali (more than once) drinking in a local pub in Australia...


Linda Myshrall 7 years ago

Awesome! You have some kinda fanciful-colorful mind, don't ya?


blondepoet profile image

blondepoet 7 years ago from australia

I love the pic of the fourth one with no arm you could do a lot with that kind of man. Thumbs up!!!!


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Thanks dohn121, I'll take you up on that offer!


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Psychidog...hilarious. Thanks for dropping in.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Badcompany..glad you bloody loved it! Thanks for dropping in.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Hey Rosa...you never seem to amaze me with you endless supply of tales. Lol. Thanks for dropping in.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Thanks Linda...I Guess I kinda do. I fantasize a lot. No kidding.


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Hey blondpoet...I'm sure you would like that in a dude, you freaky blonde cutie...thanks for dropping in.


ann 7 years ago

wheres the rest oof the stuff???


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Its a series. You're gonna have to check on back for the continuation. Thanks for dropping by.


MilkNHoney 7 years ago

Lots of information....I didn't know mythological gods were so intense....Very good information though...


fierycj profile image

fierycj 7 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Thanks MilkNHoney. The gods are pretty complex as well. Glad I could help with the info. :)


Haunty profile image

Haunty 6 years ago from Hungary

This is some hub, fiery. You don't do things in a half-assed way. ;)


fierycj profile image

fierycj 6 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Thanks, Haunty...you betcha'dont! ;)


mythbuster profile image

mythbuster 6 years ago from Utopia, Oz, You Decide

Great hub, fierycj. Nice photos shown to let us know what some of these creatures look like. The "changeling" photo... won't that just creep some people out? I am reminded to go watch Village of the Damned now... ah, those children. Some of the most frightening creatures, eh?


fierycj profile image

fierycj 6 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Yup, mythbuster....I totally agree...thanks


booger 6 years ago

cerburus is cool


fierycj profile image

fierycj 6 years ago from The Fiery Heart of Africa Author

Uh huh Booger...


Harrison 5 years ago

cool website love the freky cyclops!!!


mykreel 5 years ago

just plain creepy


jack 5 years ago

wat the hell


just 4 years ago

you're so grazy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


alex 4 years ago

Awesome. I love the buffallo lookin scaly beast

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