Bible story: Aaron

Aaron's rod changed to a serpent

Aaron, having been ordered by the Almighty to accompany Moses to the presence of Pharaoh, the two brothers lost no time in making their mission known to the Israelites, and in demanding of the king permission for the Israelites to make the journey required of them by Jehovah. The king refused the demand, and increased the burdens of the Israelites. Moses and Aaron again sought the king, and in order to move him, resorted to the miracles provided for them by the Almighty. The first of these miracles was the changing of Aaron's rod into a serpent in the presence of the king. Then followed the series of wonderful works by which the Almighty forced Pharaoh to let his people depart from Egypt, and which are graphically recorded in the opening chapters of the Book of Exodus.'

Consecration of Aaron and his sons

During his abode on Mount Sinai, Moses received from the Almighty full directions as to the construction and adornment of the Tabernacle. Then, all things being thus prepared, Moses was commanded to set up the Tabernacle, and place in it the ark of the Covenant, and to anoint Aaron and his sons to the priesthood. The solemn ceremony took place on the first day of the first month of the second year from the epoch of the Exodus, March to April, b. c. 1490. The priesthood was confined to the family of Aaron, who done could offer sacrifices 

Aaron's rod that budded

After the rebellion of Koran, Dathan, and Abiram, who perished in an attempt to force themselves into the priesthood of the Lord, a new sign was given of Jehovah's special favor to the house of Aaron. Twelve rods, or sceptres, were chosen for the several tribes, and laid up in the Tabernacle before the Ark, the name of Aaron being inscribed on the rod of Levi. In the morning, Moses went into the Tabernacle and brought forth the rods, and returned them to the princes of the tribes, when Aaron's rod was seen covered with buds and blossoms, and full-blown almonds. The rest were still dry sticks; but his was a living and fruitful, sceptre. By the command of God it was laid up in the Ark, for a perpetual memorial against rebellion.

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