CJ Stone's columns and articles for Kindred Spirit magazine

Kindred Spirit magazine

Kindred Spirit magazine was founded in 1987 by Richard Beaumont and Patricia Yates. According to the magazine's website, this was inspired by the 'The Harmonic Convergence' of that year in which thousands of spiritual seekers gathered at sacred sites throughout the world. So many different people, so many different spiritual paths, with a shared sense of respect for natural wisdom and a yearning for higher truth. Kindred Spirit was founded to offer a platform for the wide variety of groups, disciplines and spiritual organisations that were represented at these gatherings and which go under the general name of "Mind, Body, Spirit".

The first issue was published in November 1987, and since then it has gone on to feature a wide range of stories, from complementary healthcare to articles on angels and the latest explanation of the workings of Stonehenge.

The magazine appears bi-monthly and is considered to be the UK's leading guide to Mind, Body and Spirit.

I was first commissioned to write for Kindred Spirit late in 2008, by the new editor at the time, Tania Ahsan. Previously I had written for Prediction magazine, for which I had run a column for nearly five years, from 2003 to 2008. It was Tania who had commissioned me for that too, but she had since left the magazine and gone freelance. Meanwhile, the market had changed, and Prediction had turned itself from a serious astrology magazine - with a lot of in-depth articles about a wide variety of arcane and interesting subjects - to a sort of teenie fashion mag with vague occult leanings: sort of Buffy the Vampire Slayer meets Jackie magazine, or "the latest swimwear fashions to wear while communing with dolphins."

I wasn’t very comfortable in there any more, and we parted company by mutual consent.

You can read a significant number of my Prediction articles on these pages. I will always be grateful to the magazine for keeping me working through those lean years, for keeping my pen sharpened, even if my wit occasionally failed to live up to its promise.

Meanwhile Tania had just become the new editor at Kindred Spirit, and she asked me to write a regular column for the magazine.

What I proposed was series of columns under the general title Tales of Ordinary Magic.

The title is a reference to a Charles Bukowski book called Tales of Ordinary Madness (also known as Erections, Ejaculations, Exhibitions, and General Tales of Ordinary Madness). The purpose was to reflect the spirituality of everyday life. It was meant as a lighthearted antidote to the rest of the magazine. Or, as the editor put it “a humorous sign off as a back page column”. Unfortunately the readers didn’t quite see the point of the articles and it was discontinued after the third one. I actually wrote four, so that one is included in here too. They are, as follows:

Tales of Ordinary Magic 1

This one was the taster. It leads you into the theme, which was basically life through my window in Somerset Meadows. The story is about Mrs Rivers, who went to Stonehenge once in 1964 and who still remembers it to this day. How our human lives are enhanced by their intersection with the cosmic, or why a sunrise is not so mundane after all.

Tales of Ordinary Magic 2

About my nearly blind next door neighbour Daphne and her relationship with trees. About her dignity in life, and her prescience in death.

Tales of Ordinary Magic 3

This one is an old standby for me: about my good friend Steve Andrews, known on HubPages as The Bard of Ely. This was originally written as a story for the Big Issue, but developed for Kindred Spirit, it takes on the idea of Steve being an alien being on this planet (an oft repeated theme in both Steve's and my work). It was the last Tales of Ordinary Magic story to be published in Kindred Spirit.

Tales of Ordinary Magic 4

This one was never published, unfortunately. It's based on a real life incident in the Co-operative one day. For those of you who aren't British, the Co-operative (also known as the Co-op) is a unique British institution, a shop that is owned by its customers. It is the ultimate in down-to-earth shopping. Imagine my consternation, then, when I found what was going on.

All four columns have been collected together into this one hub:

Other articles

I've also written a number of other articles for the magazine. I hope very much that I will be able to contribute more in the future.

The articles are as follows:-

Along The Pilgrim's Way: From Winchester to Canterbury.

This is a travel story about a walk along the Pilgrim's Way between Sussex and Kent. This is my most successful story, in terms of sales, ever, in that it has been sold three times now to various magazines. I'm very proud of this story, not only because it has been fairly lucrative for me, but also because it is deeply atmospheric and quite meditative and it reflects the mood of a quiet walk in the countryside very well. It is also full of useful information, and might serve as a model for people practicing the art of travel writing.

Sanctuary Town: SHEN therapy In Bewdley, Worcestershire

This one is part travel column, part therapy review. I was actually commissioned to write this when Tania, who had been scheduled to undertake the therapy herself, found she was double booked. This was a great job, and I wish I had more of these. It was an all expenses paid trip to be pampered for a weekend. Unfortunately, though the therapist was a very nice man, the therapy itself did little more than send me to sleep. Stiil I got to see Bewdley, to eat ice cream, and to listen to the haunting wail of the steam train that passes along the Severn Valley ridge nearby.

Releasing Your Pain: How Amanae Works

This is a pure therapy review, and was undertaken by myself voluntarily. In this case, it was me who suggested the story, and I was pleased to write it as this particular therapy has had a deep effect on my life. I would highly recommend it to anyone who is looking for a way out of their habitual patterns of behaviour. Unlike SHEN it doesn't send you to sleep. The opposite. It makes you jump halfway to the ceiling.

John Lilly: psychedelic scientist

See, this is why I like writing for Kindred Spirit so much. Where else would you expect to find a story like this? John Lilly, the man who invented the isolation tank, a forgotten figure in the New Age movement, but highly influential in his day. Paid by the US government to undertake LSD studies, they thought he was giving it to his dolphins as part of his interpecies communication research. Instead he was taking it himself and slipping off into his isolation tank to park his body and go wandering around the cosmos. Far out, man. About as far out as you can possibly go and still manage to get back again.

Engaged Spirituality

In the wake of Russell Brand's interview with Jeremy Paxman on Newsnight, a set of reflections on the relationship between politics and spirituality. One of my favourite pieces. Again, this shows why Kindred Spirit is such a good magazine. Who else would publish material like this?

Alternative Funerals

Grief over the death of a loved one never really goes away. Even years later an unexpected memory can arise, bearing with it the pain of the original loss. It is vital then, when we say our goodbyes, that this is done in a way that fully expresses the love and the sense of sadness we feel when laying our loved-ones to rest.

This is a universal truth.

How we deal with death tells us a lot about the kind of society we live in.

  • Alternative Funerals There has been a quiet revolution in the way we say goodbye to our loved ones. CJ Stone investigates

Paganism is not a religion

Paganism is to religion as anarchism is to politics. It is anti-religion, the opposite of religion. Not religion’s friend: its enemy.

Contacts


  • Postal Address

    Diamond Publishing
    The Perfume Factory,
    140 Wales Farm Road,
    London
    W3 6UG
    United Kingdom

  • Telephone

    0208 752 8172

  • Fax

    0208 752 8185

Endorsements

"Reading this magazine is like turning a light on in a dark room - brilliantly illuminating."
-- Robert Anton Wilson - Anarchist & Philosopher

"We are all on a wonderful and interesting journey. There are so many facets to it and we are learning old ones, new ones, all the time. For many of us Kindred Spirit has been an important companion and comforting friend - a true 'kindred spirit' - for this last decade. May you continue to inspire, educate and entertain us. We need vision, hope and a compassionate sense of responsibility. You supply all these. Thank you!"
-- William Bloom - Visionary

"Over the years Kindred Spirit has become an important and established part of the Human Potential movement, providing a platform that has highlighted the work of many unconventional and original thinkers."
-- Paul McKenna - TV Presenter/Hypnotist

More by this Author


Comments 6 comments

fen lander profile image

fen lander 4 years ago from Whitstable

I used to read Prediction on-and-off for a few years... it started out in the right direction and went where you said. Shame. I was in Glastonbury for the Harmonic Convergence and that was spiritually significant in all sorts of ways for me too. I met an ex-lumberjack in the apothecary (can't spell that) who had chopped down a million trees and his karma transformed him into an apothecarist (or that) in Glastonbury. What a year. Then the hurricane came and the Berlin Wall came down a short while after... I took a lot of acid back then.


CJStone profile image

CJStone 4 years ago from Whitstable, UK Author

Apothecary. You got the word right both times. I only know cos I looked it up. Can't remember what I was doing in 1987. I wasn't very long in Whitstable (came here in 1984). Probably trying too hard to go to bed with too many women, which I've been paying for ever since. I was drinking too much beer, and that didn't do me much good either. You should contact Kindred Spirit. They might be interested in your Kent Zodiac.


Bard of Ely profile image

Bard of Ely 4 years ago from Lisbon, Portugal

Hi Chris! Thanks for the mention here and in your story! Have voted up and shared at Facebook, Myspace, Digg and Twitter. I was on my second year in Scientology in 1987.


CJStone profile image

CJStone 4 years ago from Whitstable, UK Author

He Steve, well you already know the story I think since it's quite old. I just extracted it from its collective status in a previous hub, and then wrote this to connect all the stories together. So you were only just starting scientology in 1987? For some reason I thought that was much earlier.


Bard of Ely profile image

Bard of Ely 4 years ago from Lisbon, Portugal

No, I joined in 86 and finished in 1990 when I was still working for Robin. I have got my cers here and just checked and I am right. The Meltdown album came out then too. At the time I attributed my success on getting on there to using Scientology. Tania has just posted on my wall at Facebook btw.


CJStone profile image

CJStone 4 years ago from Whitstable, UK Author

Yes, I meant that you'd only been in it a year in 87. It's odd because, as I say, I hadn't been long in Whitstable by then, so it feels like the recent past to me - although it is nearly 25 years ago - whereas your scientology stories feel like ancient history.

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